or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Animal Ethics in Clothing and Style: Do you have standards?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Animal Ethics in Clothing and Style: Do you have standards?

post #1 of 64
Thread Starter 
To move the discussion away from teh sales thread.

Leather, fur, exotic skins, hair fabrics, etc. Some of us would like to know the history behind where our clothing products come from and if they align with our personal views. Many times we focus on the end product but the sourcing of materials also tells a story. Much of our clothes originate from animal products, leaving the possibility of unapproved practices. It also creates variability of quality. For example: Some countries (like the US and Europe) use hides that are sourced from the meat industry and are commonly vegetable-tanned (a more intensive process of tanning), while other countries like India kill the cow specifically for the hide and are more likely to chrome-tan the hide.

...but does it matter at all? Let's find out.

Some brands have based their products on the subject, such as The Ethical Man line of vegan apparel. The alternative to leather is synthetics, which may spark another issue.

This video shows practices that some may find unsettling, but still an interesting and educational look at how products can vary greatly depending on source. The subject of clothing industry starts at 3:40 if you'd rather skip to it:
- Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
(It's part of a full length documentary, Earthlings, so the clothing segment extends to another part if you are trying to see the entirety.)
Edited by Nosu3 - 6/12/12 at 4:11pm
post #2 of 64

I was actually wondering how they get fur (fox, etc).  Is it farmed, or what?  Farmed where?

post #3 of 64

Great idea for a thread.

 

This might help knowing some of the designers that use or have used exotic skins:

 

Alexander McQueen, Armani, Bottega Veneta, BCBG, Braccialini, Bruno Magli, Burberry, Calvin Klein, Chloe, Chanel, Christian Dior, Christian Louboutin, Coach, Diego Dolcini, DKNY, Dolce & Gabbanna, Fendi, Gucci,  Harrods, Hermes, Jimmy Choo, Kate Spade, Jean Paul Gaultier, Lanvin, Louis Vuitton, Longchamp, Manolo Blahnik, Marc Jacobs, Max Studio Shoes, Michael Kors, Miu Miu, Mulberry, Oscar de la Renta, Prada, Ralph Lauren, Roberto Cavali, Sergio Rossi, Stuart Weitzman, Versace, Via Spiga, Yves Saint Laurent, Zagliani and I am sure there are many more. 

post #4 of 64
Thread Starter 
A lot of designers have been using Nutria fur lately, Billy Reid I know has started recently. The animal is killed because it is considered a pest for damaging wetlands. The designers re-purpose the fur that would otherwise be a waste. Sounds acceptable?
post #5 of 64
http://www.stylistsmuse.com/2012/02/balenciaga-snakeskin-ankle-boot.html

Took like two seconds. This is whyI have a problem with people who watch a documentary - or even an youtube clip like Kony- then think they know everything. These bandwagon activists do not do their own homework.
post #6 of 64
with any animal products, like skins and hair fabrics, it's really difficult to know if the animals were properly treated or not. just being informed may be the biggest challenge facing a would-be ethical consumer. where companies are getting their materials is not really widely available (or at least not easily discoverable), and then it's another challenge to figure out what the practices of that supplier are like. there's a lot more uncertainty than certainty.
post #7 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alphataru View Post

http://www.stylistsmuse.com/2012/02/balenciaga-snakeskin-ankle-boot.html
Took like two seconds. This is whyI have a problem with people who watch a documentary - or even an youtube clip like Kony- then think they know everything. These bandwagon activists do not do their own homework.

What is your point with the snakeskin boots?

Kony was a scam from the beginning. The animal industry videos on youtube or in the film Earthlings are not opinions or suggestions, they are matter of fact evidence of what occured.
post #8 of 64
i don't buy clothing which is made by animals in sweatshops
post #9 of 64
Btw, I actually support companies that promote ethical methods, provided it's not just a scheme to lure in sales.

However, for me to spend money, it's about two things: value and quality. Suppose two brands sell the same thing, say cordovan shoes. One sources from an ethical tanner, another from a questionable source, provided quality is the same, I'd go for the cheaper one. On the other hand, if price is the same, I'd go for the higher quality one.

Much like how I just dont buy stuff that are made in Vietnam, or in China, it's not because I'm making a moral statement, it's because I go for quality.

The problem with most of these ethical brands is that they neither provide value nor quality. Plenty of times, you're going to pay more for an inferior product. If they can get quality up, i'd be happy to go ethical.

In terms of fur or sweat shop, I never had a problem. Animals harvested for their skins is no different than animals harvested for their meat. On the otherhand, I really find hunting to be a cruel sport because it's basically killing for fun. Fur actually provides a lot of untility.
post #10 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosu3 View Post

What is your point with the snakeskin boots?
Kony was a scam from the beginning. The animal industry videos on youtube or in the film Earthlings are not opinions or suggestions, they are matter of fact evidence of what occured.

they look nice who does not to have a pair of snakeskin boots? i have snake skin elephant shark stingray ostrich kangaroo lizard etc.. be it boots wallets.
If you know anyone selling a real baby seal skin coat I am looking for one to give to my sister.
post #11 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosu3 View Post

What is your point with the snakeskin boots?
Kony was a scam from the beginning. The animal industry videos on youtube or in the film Earthlings are not opinions or suggestions, they are matter of fact evidence of what occured.

I was responding to Del Toro who wrote "now I feel good about wearing my Balenciagas". He has since edited it out, which makes my post seem like a non sequiteur.
post #12 of 64

If you look at how the animals you eat are produced, raised and killed, I don't think clothing is the immediate concern.

 

Or the rainforest. War for oil.

 

Or the labourers who assemble your smartphone.

 

So many things..

post #13 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alphataru View Post

Btw, I actually support companies that promote ethical methods, provided it's not just a scheme to lure in sales.
However, for me to spend money, it's about two things: value and quality. Suppose two brands sell the same thing, say cordovan shoes. One sources from an ethical tanner, another from a questionable source, provided quality is the same, I'd go for the cheaper one. On the other hand, if price is the same, I'd go for the higher quality one.
Much like how I just dont buy stuff that are made in Vietnam, or in China, it's not because I'm making a moral statement, it's because I go for quality.
The problem with most of these ethical brands is that they neither provide value nor quality. Plenty of times, you're going to pay more for an inferior product. If they can get quality up, i'd be happy to go ethical.
In terms of fur or sweat shop, I never had a problem. Animals harvested for their skins is no different than animals harvested for their meat. On the otherhand, I really find hunting to be a cruel sport because it's basically killing for fun. Fur actually provides a lot of untility.

I don't understand your logic.  For some reason you try and argue that ethical brands are either inferior or cost more.  What are you basing this on?

post #14 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alphataru View Post


I was responding to Del Toro who wrote "now I feel good about wearing my Balenciagas". He has since edited it out, which makes my post seem like a non sequiteur.


I had it up as a sort of tongue-in-cheek thing but I didn't think people would get it so I took it down.  I'm surprised because it was only up for a few seconds.

 

And I think I had "At least I can feel good wearing my Balenciaga's."  But I have several pairs of sneakers not a sexy ass pump.

post #15 of 64
Have no 'ethical concerns' about where my clothing comes from.

I love exotic skins for shoes/belts.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Animal Ethics in Clothing and Style: Do you have standards?