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W. W. Chan dinner suit commission - Page 3

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

Would not get shawl lapels on the vest. Just don't.

What????
post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

Here's an update. I finally sat with Patrick yesterday in New York. We settled on:
  • Scabal Festival 852054 midnight blue barathea at 280 grams (I was considering others, too, but they all were heavier cloths, and I will always be indoors in civilized countries with interior climate control, and I may even be forced to step onto the dance floor once or thrice)
  • Peaked lapels in black grosgrain, single button, double vents (I put my hands in my pockets), besom pockets with grosgrain piping, purple lining (as befitting my royal ego), inside breast/pen/phone pockets, grosgrain covered sleeve and front buttons
  • Uncuffed trousers with black grosprain stripe, side tabs (no loops), side pockets on the seam, normal rear pockets (usable handkerchief and my *$#!@ wallet)
  • U-shaped waistcoat, black grosgrain shawl lapels, three buttons, inside lining same purple, outside lining in back matches midnight blue

Sounds nice. Well done.

I have, however, used a simulation of Tag Cloud technology to nit-pick the things that I do not like.

But, of course, I will not be wearing your dinner suit.
post #33 of 50
Plain silk waistcoat (vest) in same color as the suit.
There should be lapels on it.
I favor flap pockets and notch lapels( a sin around here)
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

Here's an update. I finally sat with Patrick yesterday in New York. We settled on:
  • Scabal Festival 852054 midnight blue barathea at 280 grams (I was considering others, too, but they all were heavier cloths, and I will always be indoors in civilized countries with interior climate control, and I may even be forced to step onto the dance floor once or thrice)
  • Peaked lapels in black grosgrain, single button, double vents (I put my hands in my pockets), besom pockets with grosgrain piping, purple lining (as befitting my royal ego), inside breast/pen/phone pockets, grosgrain covered sleeve and front buttons
  • Uncuffed trousers with black grosprain stripe, side tabs (no loops), side pockets on the seam, normal rear pockets (usable handkerchief and my *$#!@ wallet)
  • U-shaped waistcoat, black grosgrain shawl lapels, three buttons, inside lining same purple, outside lining in back matches midnight blue

Sounds nice. Well done.

I have, however, used a simulation of Tag Cloud technology to nit-pick the things that I do not like.

But, of course, I will not be wearing your dinner suit.

Please elaborate, B.
post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Please elaborate, B.

1. I don't like matching the facing on the hip pockets of the jacket or anywhere on the vest except the buttons.

2. I don't think that you need to or should carry things in the back pockets of semi-formal pants, meaning you do not need the back pockets at all.

3. Side tabs are not needed unless pants are worn without suspenders, and to do so is an unfortunate decision guaranteeing a prom-night-ish break on the shoes.

4. I'm not a fan of groovy linings for a standard dinner suit. Someone will say, "Oh, but no one else will see it." Yeah, right. I'm not a fan of groovy linings altogether, actually.

These aren't even nitpicks, really. Just sayin' what I wouldn't do. There is no implication that your fellow Beardman should change any of his choices.
post #36 of 50
Thread Starter 

Gee, I thought the consensus was no flaps on pockets. OTR tuxes have flaps because it's cheaper to reuse the lounge suit pattern. But no flaps is more elegant and more traditional, no?

 

Also, I tend to get contrasting linings in jackets -- generally no one sees them but me, and I like little secrets like that. (And, who knows, I may do a Vegas act after I retire. I do sing pretty well in the shower... :-)

 

Also, side tabs make sense to me in non-belted trousers. I do tend to fluctuate a bit in weight. I can cinch a belt when needed, but I don't want my formal trousers ballooning in the waist when my perpetual diet happens to be working well, and that's what would happen when loose pants hang from braces, I imagine.

 

Finally, what's wrong with grosgrain lapels on the vest, Despos? Isn't it classically done that way?

post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

Gee, I thought the consensus was no flaps on pockets. OTR tuxes have flaps because it's cheaper to reuse the lounge suit pattern. But no flaps is more elegant and more traditional, no?

Yes, do besom pockets on the hips. I just think that gilding the lily with grosgrain is a bit much. As black tie crimes go, it's pretty minor, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

, I tend to get contrasting linings in jackets -- generally no one sees them but me, and I like little secrets like that. (And, who knows, I may do a Vegas act after I retire. I do sing pretty well in the shower... :-)

I hope that you don't button your jacket over that vest. If you don't, people will see the lining at some point.

Is it a big deal? Absolutely not...purple, magenta, canary yellow, or even a tapestry of unicorns copulating have all been done and also exhibiting to the world as owners twirl on their heels to the cover band playing Brick House ("Mighty mighty, just lettin' it all hang out!")
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

Also, side tabs make sense to me in non-belted trousers. I do tend to fluctuate a bit in weight. I can cinch a belt when needed, but I don't want my formal trousers ballooning in the waist when my perpetual diet happens to be working well, and that's what would happen when loose pants hang from braces, I imagine.

If you cinch your waist, your suspenders do not do their job. If you lose so much weight that your pants need cinching, but the cinching does not impede the role of the suspenders, then that is a good time to get your pants altered.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

Finally, what's wrong with grosgrain lapels on the vest, Despos? Isn't it classically done that way?

Vests have been done in every possible way. Of those ways, which do you think is most discreet?

Not that discretion is a very valued commodity, these days.

Don't worry. Your dinner suit sounds great. Let me introduce a new catch phrase to explain:

Fine...just not mine.
post #38 of 50
Thanks, B. I just wanted to ensure I was reading you correctly.

My dinner suit has been ruined for me by StyFo. Now I can see only its flaws. I cannot, however, justify replacing it with a better version given that I am certain to wear it only once per year. I guess I will have to live vicariously...
post #39 of 50
Don't let finicky people ruin your fun.
post #40 of 50
Thread Starter 

Thought I'd share this bit of wisdom from blacktieguide.com, for what it's worth:

 

"The body is constructed from the same material as the dinner jacket or is made entirely from silk to match the jacket's facings.  Also unique to the evening waistcoat are its shawl-style revers (lapels) which are usually self-faced when the body is silk or match the jacket lapels when the body is wool.  Like the waistcoat’s bottom, the revers’ lower edges can be square cut or rounded."

 

Seems to agree with me regarding the lapels on the vest. Although, I must say -- blacktieguide.com does note that the English see grosgrain piping on the hip pockets "as a sign of hired clothes."

 

On the other hand, I'm not English, just an Anglophile, so maybe I'll get a pass. (Yanks are exempt from most rules, since our accents are so barbaric.)

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

Seems to agree with me regarding the lapels on the vest. Although, I must say -- blacktieguide.com does note that the English see grosgrain piping on the hip pockets "as a sign of hired clothes."

Rather than consulting blacktieguide.com or Styleforum, look within the deepest recesses of your soul.

You will find your answer there.
post #42 of 50
Thread Starter 

Alas, my soul is completely black. (So what am I doing with a midnight blue tux?!)

 

Also, I want to completely conform to the tenets of good taste, and at the same time stand out as the unique, glorious being that I am.

 

Maybe I should have had the thing put together with velcro, so I could change my mind at will, like I used to with my Mr. Potato Head many years ago....
 

post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Don't let finicky people ruin your fun.

True. There's only one person in my circle who knows or cares, and he understands. He's actually part of your tradition, B, but from the DC area. Good guy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardman View Post

Alas, my soul is completely black. (So what am I doing with a midnight blue tux?!)

Also, I want to completely conform to the tenets of good taste, and at the same time stand out as the unique, glorious being that I am.

Maybe I should have had the thing put together with velcro, so I could change my mind at will, like I used to with my Mr. Potato Head many years ago....

 

Mr. Corbera would advise that black tie is not about standing out, but about fitting in. I only wish there were more interested in it so that I could fit in...
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Mr. Corbera would advise that black tie is not about standing out, but about fitting in.

For the men, the clothes fit in to allow the wit, charm, and depth of every man to stand out...if he has any.
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

...
2. I don't think that you need to or should carry things in the back pockets of semi-formal pants, meaning you do not need the back pockets at all.
....

Wouldn't the same go for formal and suit pants?
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