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The Contentedness thread - Page 16

post #226 of 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by artishard116 View Post

^ agree about experiences over material things. always try to do this for birthdays, holidays etc. 20 years from now i won't remember many material things i owned but i'll remember the first trip to paris.

 

True, and yet holidays are consumed as much as material objects for the most part, and the contemporary capitalist economy depends to a great extent on the generation and exploitation of 'experiences'. Yet we don't need to pay anything to feel things like love, awe, the overcoming of challenges etc. etc. We might get those by paying to go somewhere else, but we might get them as a result of paying more attention to what's around us every day, or by traveling in a different way. 

post #227 of 532
steez is an experience
post #228 of 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

True, and yet holidays are consumed as much as material objects for the most part, and the contemporary capitalist economy depends to a great extent on the generation and exploitation of 'experiences'. Yet we don't need to pay anything to feel things like love, awe, the overcoming of challenges etc. etc. We might get those by paying to go somewhere else, but we might get them as a result of paying more attention to what's around us every day, or by traveling in a different way. 

agree and good point, but I think there are different ways to 'travel'.
post #229 of 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

True, and yet holidays are consumed as much as material objects for the most part, and the contemporary capitalist economy depends to a great extent on the generation and exploitation of 'experiences'. Yet we don't need to pay anything to feel things like love, awe, the overcoming of challenges etc. etc. We might get those by paying to go somewhere else, but we might get them as a result of paying more attention to what's around us every day, or by traveling in a different way. 

This is a wonderful simple yet eloquent argument for paying attention to what's around you and being thankful for it. Not to get all sentimental on it, but I've found this to be a huge part of my recent (last 2.5 years) entry into being a parent. Constantly being asked about everything, and having an experience sponge attached to me has forced/given me the opportunity to (re) discover aspects of my city, region, and self that I *know* I would not or could not have done without my son. In short, amongst all the challenges and frustrations, the biggest gift my son has given me is a new found sense of contentment, and the ability and desire to refresh it.

I still like clothes a lot though.
post #230 of 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by oboy_oboy View Post


This is a wonderful simple yet eloquent argument for paying attention to what's around you and being thankful for it. Not to get all sentimental on it, but I've found this to be a huge part of my recent (last 2.5 years) entry into being a parent. Constantly being asked about everything, and having an experience sponge attached to me has forced/given me the opportunity to (re) discover aspects of my city, region, and self that I *know* I would not or could not have done without my son. In short, amongst all the challenges and frustrations, the biggest gift my son has given me is a new found sense of contentment, and the ability and desire to refresh it.
I still like clothes a lot though.

 

I agree totally. Unsurprisingly, I am also a relatively new dad (my little boy is two and a half now)...

post #231 of 532
Very true, Otis! Kids do help one remember to appreciate the simpler things in life. My daughter and I love just walking around town on Sundays, when it is quiet. Or, we often walk down to the local bakery for a quiet Saturday morning breakfast. Simple rituals like that are much appreciated by kids.

Heck, we even had a water fight in the backyard this weekend, and she said it was the most fun we've ever had.
post #232 of 532

 

Anyone who lives in southern California will recognize a pair of rainbows when they see them. I know flops are absolutely SF unapproved but this isn't about style, it's about functionality, so Style Forum has no say. I've owned two pairs of these things, exactly the same, and had to retire the first pair after four years of wear. The leather was literally so cracked and smooth that I could slip in them while they were perfectly dry walking on a flat surface. This pair here is more or less a reincarnation of the old and in less then six months they've traveled from Honolulu to Vienna. It is physically impossible to wear them anywhere shorts is inappropriate, but luckily a large portion of my life is lived where shorts are so it's all good. As long as I'm alive I will probably own a pair of 9.5 brown rainbows even if I just wear them around the house.

post #233 of 532
This thread is the testament that if one is to splurge, do it on jackets or footwear
post #234 of 532
Jeans, jeans as well. Though my favourite pair are from APC, I got from SF for 50 dollars 2-3 years ago. If the crotch wasn't completely busted, I'd still wear them most days. As it is, I'm trying to find a way to repair them.
post #235 of 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louys View Post

...pair of rainbows...

yes! growing up in a socal beach town, I've had Rainbows since I was a kid, long before they were coopted by coeds and frat boys. they are the best chilling at home, surf trip, walking to the beach footwear. I know flip flops aren't really "high" style, but they have a certain look that are just right with a particular lifestyle. I've had me current pair for about 5 years. :-)
post #236 of 532

There really is something to be said for local style.

post #237 of 532
Thread Starter 
I wanted to post this story here that I read about on MC. I think it's in the spirit of the thread.

fritzl, as you may know, is a member of the MC community who has particularly strong knowledge and opinions on shoemaking. For 2 decades he has been enjoying bespoke handmade shoes made in the tradition of the Austro-Hungarian school of shoemaking.

Here is a pair of his well-worn, well-loved shoes:
525x525px-LL-6e79336f_vbattach8953.jpg
525x525px-LL-1027a3d6_vbattach8954.jpg
525x525px-LL-e745e228_vbattach8955.jpg

There are many more in the Austro-hungarian thread linked above.

In 1994 he was introduced to Mr Gyula Kiss, and so began an enduring client-craftsman relationship.

My understanding is that a few years ago Mr Kiss was forced to come out of retirement to support his wheelchair-bound wife and intellectually disabled son. To help him out in this crisis, fritzl purchased his collection of un-collected bespoke shoes, which he continues to sell to SF members (his thread Operation Paprika has many wonderful examples). E.G. member F. Corbera's pair.
Quote:
“As long as he’s talking about his own shoes, public relations expert Gerd Wermescher only trusted in the abilities of his Hungarian master shoemaker, Gyula Kiss, who has made his shoes since 1994.

“’Mr. Kiss is a living legend, who has made more than five thousand pairs of shoes in all varieties through his long career, specializing in the Blucher model,’ says Wermescher. ‘I am glad that I discovered him at the early stages of my own career, and we were able to develop a deep relationship.’

“All shoes are entirely handmade in Kiss’s small workshop in Hungary. Only an old Singer sewing machine, with the foot-operated mechanism, found its way to the premises of Mr. Kiss. Otherwise, you would only hear the tapping and hammering from traditional hand tools. Master Kiss focused on the Austrian-Hungarian School of shoemaking, which has gained the interest of shoe enthusiasts around the globe.

“A few years ago during one of his visits Wermescher discovered that this great man had taken on the responsibility for the care of a mentally challenged son in his fifties and a wife who is wheelchair-bound.

“Wermescher, who is descended from a shoemaker dynasty himself, took this as the starting impetus for Operation Paprika.

“‘I want to pay back some of the good things that I received in my life.’ With his partners and friends, the hunt for shoe lovers all over the world began. Sartorial discussion forums were combed through and the cause was presented to an international audience.

“After the order is placed, the shoes wander to the famous last maker Kalman Berta, who fits in the lasted trees for proper care and maintenance of the masterpieces.

“One distinct feature of the Kiss shoe is its soul, something a industrial shoe will never inherit. These are made to last a lifetime. They hold against every surface and can be repaired and resoled several times — ideally they will outlast the initial owner and are handed from father to the son.”

Recently, Mr Kiss passed away, and the world lost a great craftsman. However, fritzl continues to enjoy his collection of beautifully crafted, near-indestructible shoes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

the man who built more than 5000 pair of shoes...








family picture












fritzl, let me know if you don't want this posted here.
Edited by hendrix - 8/26/12 at 12:52pm
post #238 of 532
I just got back from donating a large portion of my wardrobe to a local long-term shelter for families in transition. Lots of suits, jackets, winter jackets that no longer fit as I've slimmed down quite a bit and/or no longer fit my style.

Everything that remains are pieces that I love. I decided to lay out what I do have: outerwear (7), shoes (8), suit (1), jackets (4), 3 pair of really nice pants and a single pair of Japanese denim.

I fill in with decent-enough quality basics and have a diverse wardrobe that blends in at work, in town, but still have unique details that elicit compliments.

I feel like I've finally struck a good balance. I tried the full-on Pitti thing and came off pretty douchey. My wife hated it. I didn't fit in with my surroundings. I learned a lot from the SW&D crew and took my time in purchasing. Now, my wife, kids and their friends think I look pretty cool. Unfortunately I really am a douche.

Buying well means I buy less often. Laying out and photographing the clothing groups really helps eliminate unneeded purchases. Sure, I could still use a few things, but the impulse has gone way down.

Conclusion: MC has taught me a great deal about fit. It is amazing how little details matter. SW&D have taught me a great deal about designers, outerwear and some of the keys to the elusive 'cool' vibe. Of course, getting fit helps a lot, and the Random Heath guys give excellent advice, reducing the hype and clutter of the internet to dispense real-world advice. Thanks guys, I lost 40 pounds from weightlifting and diet alone.

There are so many good threads on this board, so many great vendors, too. A good haircut, some nice eyewear (mine are Warby Parker), quality denim and a great pair of shoes are all I need to look and feel great.

I am content. Thank you, StyleForum.
Edited by CodPiece - 8/25/12 at 11:26am
post #239 of 532
great post. ^
post #240 of 532

indeed
 

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