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RLBL - Installing Working Buttonholes - Page 4

post #46 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by silvercitynyc View Post

I don't even know what that is...but I would assume that if they did, it would be in their global flagship store...the RL Mansion on Madison Ave. in NYC... biggrin.gif

That would be the Grand Master Purple Label Tailor. A true god amongst in-house alteration tailors. Only Ralph Lauren himself can sew you a better buttonhole.
post #47 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


That would be the Grand Master Purple Label Tailor. A true god amongst in-house alteration tailors. Only Ralph Lauren himself can sew you a better buttonhole.

 

Now THAT would be sick. Ralph Lauren hand-sewing my functional button-holes. BALLER.

post #48 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by silvercitynyc View Post

Now THAT would be sick. Ralph Lauren hand-sewing my functional button-holes. BALLER.

Okay, just to be clear, since i don't know you: I'm being facetious. In-house alteration tailors at designer boutiques and high-end department stores are notoriously bad, often representing second or third rate talent. There is almost always someone designated the shop's "Master Tailor," who is almost always an ornery older man with a thick European accent that may or may not be able to tailor, but who is brought out by the salespeople when they want to make a customer believe he's getting serious attention from the "Master Tailor." He'll probably f*ck your suit into a worse condition than it was before, but you will be convinced it is way better and the way it should be, because the "Master Tailor" handled the job. When you go back to the shop a week or two later, after you've had time to develop second thoughts and realize your several thousand dollar suit is an awful aesthetic abortion, the salespeople assure you there is no mistake and chide you for not fully appreciating the fashionable European cut. They know, because the "Master Tailor" told them so.
post #49 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


Okay, just to be clear, since i don't know you: I'm being facetious. In-house alteration tailors at designer boutiques and high-end department stores are notoriously bad, often representing second or third rate talent. There is almost always someone designated the shop's "Master Tailor," who is almost always an ornery older man with a thick European accent that may or may not be able to tailor, but who is brought out by the salespeople when they want to make a customer believe he's getting serious attention from the "Master Tailor." He'll probably f*ck your suit into a worse condition than it was before, but you will be convinced it is way better and the way it should be, because the "Master Tailor" handled the job. When you go back to the shop a week or two later, after you've had time to develop second thoughts and realize your suit is awful and cost you several thousand dollars, you go back to complain, the salespeople assure you there is no mistake and chide you for not fully appreciating the fashionable European cut. They know, because the "Master Tailor" told them so.


u r evilol

post #50 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


Okay, just to be clear, since i don't know you: I'm being facetious. In-house alteration tailors at designer boutiques and high-end department stores are notoriously bad, often representing second or third rate talent. There is almost always someone designated the shop's "Master Tailor," who is almost always an ornery older man with a thick European accent that may or may not be able to tailor, but who is brought out by the salespeople when they want to make a customer believe he's getting serious attention from the "Master Tailor." He'll probably f*ck your suit into a worse condition than it was before, but you will be convinced it is way better and the way it should be, because the "Master Tailor" handled the job. When you go back to the shop a week or two later, after you've had time to develop second thoughts and realize your several thousand dollar suit is an awful aesthetic abortion, the salespeople assure you there is no mistake and chide you for not fully appreciating the fashionable European cut. They know, because the "Master Tailor" told them so.


I already called Ralph. He's on his way to do my on-site adjustments.

post #51 of 81
That sounds like that one guy who purchased an abomination from Tom Ford and heated up the forum.
post #52 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by yywwyy View Post

That sounds like that one guy who purchased an abomination from Tom Ford and heated up the forum.

 

Link?

post #53 of 81
I cant not find the thread anymore ffffuuuu.gif it had fit-pics and a crazy number of replys. Quite the tragedy. I'm sure you could find it if you searched hard enough.
post #54 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by yywwyy View Post

That sounds like that one guy who purchased an abomination from Tom Ford and heated up the forum.

His posts were funny precisely because he didn't realize how naive he was being. His experience is not unique or rare.
post #55 of 81
Yes. Happened to me too before at a Burberry store, except I immediately made them get me a new coat.
post #56 of 81
Bhambi's does great work, but Ramon's on Lafayette/Houston did a bang up job on a Boglioni jacket which came with detached buttons for much less than Bhambi.
post #57 of 81
Wear and enjoy.
post #58 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by T&A Fan View Post

Bhambi's does great work, but Ramon's on Lafayette/Houston did a bang up job on a Boglioni jacket which came with detached buttons for much less than Bhambi.

 

Bhambi's is definitely expensive. Although they said full-bespoke suits made in their back room here in NYC start around $2,000+.

 

Am I missing something here? That's a GREAT value considering how much other makers charge for bespoke.

post #59 of 81
Start at $2000+ means it will cost more than $2000 once you start choosing fabric, lining, buttons, etc...
post #60 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by yywwyy View Post

Working button holes look much nicer though. I'd say it's worth it to get them on better suits. RLBL's are definately constructed with working button holes in mind, according to my tailor.

Sure he wasn't just trying to sell you working buttonholes? I can't fathom how any suit could be more or less "constructed with working button holes in mind."

Not sure if srs?

It's in how the lining is set in the sleeve. Lower end RTW (with non-functional buttonholes) will often have a sleeve lining that is fully attached around the wrist. "working buttonhole ready" sleeves the lining will already have the split to accommodate the two sides that button together.

I didn't explain that very well, but it's pretty obvious when you see it. It's not at all uncommon to see a garment described as "ready for working buttonholes" or similar; I believe this is what they are referring to. It doesn't rule out having buttonholes put in, but the sleeve lining has to be reworked in addition to the holes themselves, adding to the complexity (and the risk that someone will screw it up).
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