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Is this the new style for suits? - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

I think closed quarters and longer coats are on the way back as well.

Sweet, I can just keep my old navy suit and don't have to buy a new one.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by facet View Post

Sweet, I can just keep my old navy suit and don't have to buy a new one.
It'll still look somewhat dated
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by allaboutshoes View Post

It'll still look somewhat dated

Yeah, I was being somewhat facetious.
post #19 of 24
I know satisfied.gif but teh n00bs may not realize
post #20 of 24
There is a lot of confusion and conflation in this thread.

There are two things going on here: the concave shape of the shoulder line, and the roping of the sleeve head. The two do not always go together.

The shoulder line you depict is concave and called a "pagoda" shoulder. It refers to the curvature of the shoulder's line between the collar and the seam between the sleeve and jacket body. It does not include the sleeve or sleeve head and is defined completely distinct from them.

"Roped shoulder" is commonly used to describe the mounded sleeve head in the picture. However, the term is a little confusing, as it it refers to the shaping of the sleeve head (the top of the sleeve, where it meets the jacket body) and has nothing to do with the shoulder line. Note, there is no actually roping in a roped shoulder. It just looks that way.

You do not need to combine a roped sleeve head with a pagoda shoulder line, though they are often paired.

Finally, though it has become common to use "Neapolitan" to describe a certain sort of shoulder treatment, that is also misleading. What is commonly commercialized as a "Neapolitan shoulder" is a sleeve head set into the shoulder seam as one would a shirt sleeve ("spalla camicia" means "shirt sleeve"). Why is that wrong? Because over the course of Neapolitan tailoring history, many different treatments of the sleeve head have been popular--including roped shoulders. Also, the terminology ignores the shape of the shoulder line. Common "Neapolitan" RTW brands like Kiton and Isaia sell jackets with very straight shoulder lines. There is nothing wrong with that, but today's Neapolitan bespoke tailors seem to either prefer a much more naturally rounded shoulder line (most common) or a pagoda-type shoulder (more rare).

There is nothing about roped, pagoda shoulders that is more English or Savile Row than Neapolitan. Unless, of course, you are relying on GQ-level tailoring terminology.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

There is a lot of confusion and conflation in this thread.


How do you, then, tell it apart from other threads?

confused.gif
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bexcellence View Post

I picked up an Armani Collezioni suit and I noticed the shoulders seem a bit higher than the rest of the suit. Here's a pic example from another Armani suit on the website ($1,800)

 

49125036PK_14_r.jpg

 

 

Is this a maternity suit? He sure does look pregnant...

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Note, there is no actually roping in a roped shoulder. It just looks that way.

This elicits a Haruki Murakami level of sadness.
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geezer View Post

The ever-ebullient Eddie Rowlands made me an odd jacket some years ago featuring a fairly soft shoulder and a heavily roped sleevehead. It's the only one I have like it and I'm quite fond of that styling feature.
The older I get, the more I find myself moving away from The Drape and admiring a firm shoulder with a roped armhole. It doesn't work if you are already boxy, but on tall thin chaps like me, it has its advantages.
BTW, the suit in the OP's picture has so much wrong with it that I hardly know where to begin.

whats wrong with it?
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