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Technical Outerwear - Page 12

post #166 of 984
Does anyone have experience with the new waterproof material mentioned in the Outside article, Polartec's Neoshell (http://www.neoshell.com/)? I'm very intrigued because Polartec has always been a pioneer in synthetic fabrics, and if they think they can take on Gore-Tex, I want to give them a look.

I bought Polartec fleece way back in the day when it was first introduced and was relatively expensive. It was awesome back then, and those fleeces are still some of the best I've got. The cheaper fleece you find at Old Navy and Gap are junk compared to Polartek's fleece, and many of the top brands still advertise their items are made from Polartec.

REI sold a Neoshell jacket on their website a few months back, but I couldn't find anything at my local store. Would love to hear if someone has had a chance to test it out.
post #167 of 984
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Iron View Post

It is because Gore-tex  works, and very few other products come close. The only other one that I am aware of that is close would be eVent. I purchased my first Gore-Tex jacket ~1981 in Washington State, it was made by a small company down in Oregon called Columbia. Awesome parka and I wore it most of the year in the Olympic Mountains hunting and Puget Sound area fishing. Prior to that it was waxed cotton or solid rubber, both which made you sweat like hell with any physical exertion.  Yeah at one time Columbia made some decent stuff. And it was waterproof until Ma Columbia decided she could do better and started with their own OmniDry crap that is worthless shit. 

That might have been true 20 years ago but in my experience it's not true now. I've used gore-tex and it's great but I also like other products.

Soldiers just want to wear shit they're familiar with.

I would say a major advantage of gore-tex over the high density weaves is how light it is.
Edited by hendrix - 8/4/12 at 7:19pm
post #168 of 984
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDroog View Post

Does anyone have experience with the new waterproof material mentioned in the Outside article, Polartec's Neoshell (http://www.neoshell.com/)? I'm very intrigued because Polartec has always been a pioneer in synthetic fabrics, and if they think they can take on Gore-Tex, I want to give them a look.
I bought Polartec fleece way back in the day when it was first introduced and was relatively expensive. It was awesome back then, and those fleeces are still some of the best I've got. The cheaper fleece you find at Old Navy and Gap are junk compared to Polartek's fleece, and many of the top brands still advertise their items are made from Polartec.
REI sold a Neoshell jacket on their website a few months back, but I couldn't find anything at my local store. Would love to hear if someone has had a chance to test it out.

 

I also had Polartec fleece when it first came out and still have a few pieces left, although I have moved to higher density fleece over the years like R4. If you like Polartech then I highly recommend checking out the Polartech power dry base layer if you haven't already. It is all I use for a base layer anymore. It has replaced all my technical silk and polypro. Depending on the temp merino wool over that, high density fleece over that and then a gore shell. It has kept me warm and dry down to -20 F while physically active and I always stay dry even in warmer temps too. Awesome stuff.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

That might have been true 20 years ago but in my experience it's not true now. I've used gore-tex and it's great but I also like other products.
Soldiers just want to wear shit they're familiar with.
I would say a major advantage of gore-tex over the high density weaves is how light it is.

 

Being retired military I can accurately say your statement is totally false. Soldiers 1) usually are young without any previous experience or bias concerning technical rainwear 2) Don't give a damn what it is made of. They just want it to work in the field. 

 

Even GT isn't the best in all situations. Hydrostatic pressure such as sitting on a wet log will cause your ass to get wet in a short period of time. Many of us are still looking for the perfect rainwear. In the Pacific NW commercial fisherman and most Alaskan hunting guides still wear rubber tops and bottoms. They avoid all technical rainwear including Gore Tex like the plague. Like I said I have tried several of the membranes including recently and for my use of heavy physical effort in all types of weather and temps. they don't cut it. And like I also said if all your doing is light physical activity like wearing it in the city it is fine for that use

 

Here is REI's take on membranes vs. gore tex (ePTFE and eVent), of which they sell several types of both:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/301652/technical-outerwear/165

Lower cost, yet the newest versions are approaching levels of breathability comparable to 2-layer and even high-end, 3-layer ePTFE laminates.

 

They say it is approaching lower end 2 layer gore tex performance but they aren't there yet. Believe me.

 

Backcountry.com (hey got to have love for the RAM!) has a short but good article saying exactly what I said:

http://backcountrybeacon.com/2010/03/waterproof-breathable-buy-the-right-rain-gear/

 

I have recently owned or own Marmot PreCip and the MHW Conduit mentioned, among others such as Dry-plus and Omni-Dry. And am still looking.

 

As to footwear.. rubber boots of course. Half a size larger than normal with wicking socks under heavier smart wool socks. When your trying to get within kissing distance of a big game animal to stick an arrow in it also servers as scent control. And you can walk through most bogs and muskegs if your careful of depth. If longer faster walking is required such as backpacking, pheasant hunting or ruffled grouse busting through brush leather boots treated with HDLP can be made totally waterproofed. The Russel Moccasin Grand Slam Sheep Hunters are straight leather but treated with HDLP and never leaked. The Meindl Perfekt hikers are gore tex lined but also treated with HDLP. Same for the LL Bean Cresta Hikers and Meindll Perfekt Hunters. But not something you would wear everyday in town or the city. LOL or shouldn't IMO.

 

1000

 

Even suede like my AE suede chukkas are very waterproof treated with Bicks Gardmore. Well you did ask what I'd wear when the Zombies came. I'm going out in style....   smile.gif

 

1000

post #169 of 984

Just catching up on this thread - some good stuff on here!

 

Currently I am lusting over the Stone Island Shadow Project Fishtail parka from A/W '12

 

1000

 

Its a wool/linen/nylon mix with "spalmatura" coating, and nylon backing, waterproof, breathable etc. etc.

 

1000

 

Also in sage green:

 

1000

 

One of the better fishtails out there I reckon, would kop if I had a spare $1500...

post #170 of 984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorcan7 View Post

Just catching up on this thread - some good stuff on here!

 

Currently I am lusting over the Stone Island Shadow Project Fishtail parka from A/W '12

 

1000

 

Its a wool/linen/nylon mix with "spalmatura" coating, and nylon backing, waterproof, breathable etc. etc.

 

1000

 

Also in sage green:

 

1000

 

One of the better fishtails out there I reckon, would kop if I had a spare $1500...

today's your lucky day, this jacket is only $1060 with free shipping (if you're in the USA).  if you're from europe, then it's 1300...  check end clothing.

post #171 of 984

I'm in UK and its £995 ($1562) at End, bit cheaper at Firmament Berlin.  Maybe when the next sales season come around... hell where in US is it $1060?

post #172 of 984

it's not in the US, it's from end clothing which i believe is somewhere in the UK.  they deduct 20% off for non EU customers.  The retail price was like 1300, so after the 20% discount it came down to 1060.  why it retails more in the UK, i don't know.

post #173 of 984
Herno Laminar now available: http://havenshop.ca/the_latest_news/introducing-herno-laminar/

Prices seem reasonable but I've not seen any of these in person yet. That Short Coat could fit a nice void in my tech collection.

Related to Mr. Hugh, I know the lukewarm feeling towards some of Acr's bag collection, but apparently this upcoming season will be the last for those done in collab with Bagjack.
post #174 of 984
^like the bomber and possibly the trench
post #175 of 984
nice thread hendrix, stone island shadow project stuff is sick

i may have found the bomber i've been looking for
http://www.maharishistore.com/product/0000421300/mens/tops-&-outerwear/-jackets/7063-diamond-quilting-aviator-tour-jacket/black/7063-diamond-quilting-aviator-tour-jacket-black-mens-tops-&-outerwear--jackets.html

post #176 of 984
Got some outlier climbers. Feels good, like leggings!
post #177 of 984

anyone know of some good trackpants out there? I liked the isaora ones but they were way too slim and now are out of stock in most sizes. 

post #178 of 984
Thread Starter 
I've re-thought my position on some of the technical details of veilance et al. (microseams, waterproof zippers, laminated construction etc):

While these innovations are small in perhaps insignificant, it is encouraging to see brands trying to figure out ways to do things better, not cheaper or more saleable.
post #179 of 984
Anyone can recommend some technical outerwear for vancouver fall/winter weather? Preferably a jacket less than >$550
post #180 of 984

Aether will get the job done. However, you're looking at meeting the threshold of your budget. Some things are worth the money, though. If you kind find Veilance on sale--which typically isn't too hard--that'd be my choice.

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