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Maomao x Gaz Italian Sartorial Adventure 2012 - Page 10

post #136 of 244
Thread Starter 
Puckering is due to sleeves being too narrow. This fellow has a preference for a narrower cut, which is expressed in this manner. As Andrew pointed out, the narrowness manifest as creases along the sleeves. Also, lighter fabrics tend to show more of the puckering than heavier ones.

Regardless, this was the first jacket made to tailor's house style. Micromanagement at the first instance introduces biases and compromises that a tailor makes to his house cut. Which means subsequent modifications become much more difficult to manage as it blurs, at least for me, what would have been otherwise a different outcome. In this example, only the proportion of the sleeves needs to be changed. I now know the positives and limitations of this particular cut for my physique and have requested more volume for the entire sleeve.

The take away here is that every decision made on aesthetics has some consequence, ranging from the choice of fabric by the client to the volume of materials used by the tailor. A narrow sleeve will crease no matter the fabric, may it be fresco, mohair or linen but also a fabric like say, linen, will always crease no matter the volume.

Having said that, this is a favorite jacket and it has been getting lots of use. Whether it is acceptable or not, it's up to the wearer. And for me, it is.
Edited by gazman70k - 7/29/12 at 6:26pm
post #137 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post

... this is a favorite jacket and it has been getting lots of use. Whether it is acceptable or not, it's up to the wearer. And for me, it is.

Well written and I couldn't agree more. I think it looks great. In this instance, the wrinkles add character and show how much the wearer appreciates his clothes. Too often we forget we're meant to wear the stuff. A coat is not a museum piece.
post #138 of 244
I'm not sure which is more laudable, your tailor or your ability to maintain the same weight over 18 months.
post #139 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

weight

^ is the biggest risk of bespoke, a.k.a. the "5 cm" phenomenon around here.

To wit,

Hanks (with male Spanx no doubt) early this year in his "Bespoke" (a.k.a. male movie star Haute Couture) Tom Ford . . .

hanks.jpg

Hank a few weeks ago . . .

48351359.jpg

- M

Gaz your MBT has the best interpretation of "house lapels and collar" I have seen. Not the idiosyncratic signature-esque swoops of Liverano, yet perfectly related to the jacket as a whole. Rubinacci's comes close, but not like this guy. It's like he hits the "golden ratio" for lapels and collar on the head! Great eyes. fing02[1].gif
post #140 of 244
.
Edited by incontro - 7/30/12 at 1:46am
post #141 of 244
As usual, I dissent. The work looks well-executed but I dislike the
design.
post #142 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post

Puckering is due to sleeves being too narrow. This fellow has a preference for a narrower cut, which is expressed in this manner. As Andrew pointed out, the narrowness manifest as creases along the sleeves. Also, lighter fabrics tend to show more of the puckering than heavier ones.
Regardless, this was the first jacket made to tailor's house style. Micromanagement at the first instance introduces biases and compromises that a tailor makes to his house cut. Which means subsequent modifications become much more difficult to manage as it blurs, at least for me, what would have been otherwise a different outcome. In this example, only the proportion of the sleeves needs to be changed. I now know the positives and limitations of this particular cut for my physique and have requested more volume for the entire sleeve.
The take away here is that every decision made on aesthetics has some consequence, ranging from the choice of fabric by the client to the volume of materials used by the tailor. A narrow sleeve will crease no matter the fabric, may it be fresco, mohair or linen but also a fabric like say, linen, will always crease no matter the volume.
Having said that, this is a favorite jacket and it has been getting lots of use. Whether it is acceptable or not, it's up to the wearer. And for me, it is.

 

I understand the narrower cut and also the lightweightness (right?) of the fabric (and I also understand the house cut of the tailor) infact I think that the overall work is nice and well executed, but that could be done without wrinkling on the sleeves - precisely, is the trumpet of the sleeve to cause that problem and not the sleeve beeing too large to the effective roundness of the sleeve collar (BTW for those others asking, this is not the "manica a camicia" typical of the neapolitan style). 

 

"A narrow sleeve will crease no matter the fabric, may it be fresco, mohair or linen but also a fabric like say, linen, will always crease no matter the volume."

 

I don't think so. It depends. As you may know the final result is the complessive work of the underlayer and how you work them.

Trust me, sometimes it is possible to find a good compromise between the narrowness of the sleeve but also its dynamicity and the aesthetical form. 

 

"Acceptability or inacceptability", well it all depends by its wearer. As for the shoes artisans, everyone think it differents, they all have a different "school" and this is why there are many artisans doing a discrete job. But as you may know very few of them are doing something incredible and unique...that is the real Artisan.

 

 

post #143 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post

Hanks (with male Spanx no doubt) early this year in his "Bespoke" (a.k.a. male movie star Haute Couture) Tom Ford . . .
hanks.jpg
Hank a few weeks ago . . .
48351359.jpg
- M
Gaz your MBT has the best interpretation of "house lapels and collar" I have seen. Not the idiosyncratic signature-esque swoops of Liverano, yet perfectly related to the jacket as a whole. Rubinacci's comes close, but not like this guy. It's like he hits the "golden ratio" for lapels and collar on the head! Great eyes. fing02[1].gif

That just plainly deceitful, the bespoke dinner jacket makes him like another person

Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post

More of secret Florentine Tailor
My first commission...
Handwork on shoulder
medium800.jpg
Finished product.

The Jacket would be nice for causal setting. Shoulder looks artistic, wear it in good health
post #144 of 244
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post

Hanks (with male Spanx no doubt) early this year in his "Bespoke" (a.k.a. male movie star Haute Couture) Tom Ford . . .

hanks.jpg

Hank a few weeks ago . . .

48351359.jpg

 

Probably the best argument I've seen in favour of tailored clothing, ever. Amazing.

post #145 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewRogers View Post

Well written and I couldn't agree more. I think it looks great. ...

+2
post #146 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

Probably the best argument I've seen in favour of tailored clothing, ever. Amazing.

...he looks nice wearing nice tailored clothes, he looks like crap wearing crap casual clothes?
post #147 of 244
I think he looks pretty good for a 56 year old guy, I'm not seeing some remarkable transformation.
post #148 of 244
Gaz buddy, what an adventure! And your choices are...wow?icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

The next time you're in town, you HAVE to give me more details. We can do it over a nice bottle of mccallan. I'll bring the bottle if you bring the cigars!biggrin.gif

a.
post #149 of 244
Thread Starter 
In September, a.

L33 again.
post #150 of 244

Pure beauty. So so nice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post

More of secret Florentine Tailor
My first commission...
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