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Ethnic contributions to classic men's style - Page 3

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalfordOfLondon View Post

I've been to Kashmir and I can assure you - it is not Indian in the slightest.
They may lay claim to the area (well, the Indian controlled part) but the culture and people have nothing in similar with India as a whole.
I would add that it's the most beautiful part of the world I've seen smile.gif


Are you implying that there is a single culture defining India as a whole outside of Kashmir?
post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndianBoyz View Post

Kashmir is historically India. The name derived from the Hindu Kashyapa rulers who were there before muslims, mughals and whatever else. No Persia.
Kashmir shawls were famous before mughals became interested in them.

 

the concept of india or india india?  just because a region has an historic indian name doesn't make it part of india. 

 

while we are on the topic, brook's brother's email spam claimed "seersucker" is derived from the persian word "shir-u-shakar".

 

wikipedia claimed cashmere was originated from persian word 'pashmina' and the the founder of the cashmere wool industry was Kashmir, Zayn-ul-Abidin with weavers from turkestan.

 

neither sound indian to me, but all were under brit empire's sphere of influence.

post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalfordOfLondon View Post

I've been to Kashmir and I can assure you - it is not Indian in the slightest.
They may lay claim to the area (well, the Indian controlled part) but the culture and people have nothing in similar with India as a whole.
I would add that it's the most beautiful part of the world I've seen smile.gif

what does that mean "not indian in the slightest?
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post

what does that mean "not indian in the slightest?
I mean that even though India is a culturally rich and varied country: there is always a feeling that you are "in India". India is (as I believe) defined by it's diversity.

I have spent about a year in India in total and travelled around quite a lot of the country. Each state is very different from the next but still very "Indian".

When I finally made it to Kashmir this year, the feeling was very odd. It's very difficult to put it down to one thing but I felt as if I was in a different country from the moment I crossed the border.

The locals that I spoke with were fiercely independent. They harboured no "ill feeling" as such towards the Indians (that they showed) but they made it clear that they considered Kashmir as a separate country.

I was led to believe by some Indians that the majority of Kashmiris had an affinity with Pakistan. I would say that they considered Pakistan to be the lesser of the two evils.

Also - Indians visit Kashmir as tourists. They stick out like a sore thumb. It's not like the country and people change gradually as you go North. Jammu (just 300km South of Srinagar) is a world apart from Kashmir and it's people.

This is only my experience and I thought I'd share to those interested.
post #35 of 50
Is this thread about foo.gif ?

confused.gif
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

 

neither sound indian to me, but all were under brit empire's sphere of influence.

 

The empire in historic terms is a relatively recent event - it really doesn't matter what sounds Indian to you or how indian a place like Kashmir feels to MoL, fact is it's in India, and india is in South Asia and that's where cashmere originated from.

 

Now if you feel it didn't or if you think the world is flat and not round, I guess that's your problem.

post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stirling View Post

 

The empire in historic terms is a relatively recent event - it really doesn't matter what sounds Indian to you or how indian a place like Kashmir feels to MoL, fact is it's in India, and india is in South Asia and that's where cashmere originated from.

 

Now if you feel it didn't or if you think the world is flat and not round, I guess that's your problem.

 

Yes sir.  Because you said so.  And with your logic, Brits are Indians because they ruled India.

post #38 of 50

"Ethnic" contributions to classic men's style..? What does that mean? Do you mean people of color..?

post #39 of 50

.


Edited by chogall - 5/18/12 at 2:55pm
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee_44106 View Post

Silk from China

Silk was Already known in the Indus Valley Civilisation.

http://harvard.academia.edu/IreneGood/Papers/82330/New_Evidence_for_Silk_in_the_Indus_Valley
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalfordOfLondon View Post

I've been to Kashmir and I can assure you - it is not Indian in the slightest.
They may lay claim to the area (well, the Indian controlled part) but the culture and people have nothing in similar with India as a whole.
I would add that it's the most beautiful part of the world I've seen smile.gif

The original inhabitants were Kashmiri Brahmins. No region in India is the same. It's a land of different cultures, tribes and races.
You will find the Indo-European tribes up north to the Dravidians to the South. That doesn't mean it's not an Indian land. First of all it's a land of Hindus originally and a land east of the river Sindh which means historically called an "Indian" land.

We don't need another Brit to try and divide us, give me a break.

The word Kashmir is an ancient Sanskrit word which literally means Land of Kashyapa Rishi. He was a Saraswat Brahmin and one of the Saptarishis (scholars), who was key in formalizing the ancient Historical Vedic Religion. The Kashmiri Pandits are his descendants and have named the valley after him, in his honour. Kashmir was one of the major centre of Sanskrit scholars.

These are Kashmiri Brahmins:


wks9yb.jpg



Mughals/ Muslims (mongols) came to the area thousands of years later. Violently if I may add.
Many Hindus had to migrate to different places in India because of this. But slowly they're moving back.
Edited by IndianBoyz - 5/19/12 at 2:10am
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

the concept of india or india india?  just because a region has an historic indian name doesn't make it part of india. 

while we are on the topic, brook's brother's email spam claimed "seersucker" is derived from the persian word "shir-u-shakar".

wikipedia claimed cashmere was originated from persian word 'pashmina' and the the founder of the cashmere wool industry was Kashmir, Zayn-ul-Abidin with weavers from turkestan.

neither sound indian to me, but all were under brit empire's sphere of influence.

Like I said, Kashmiri paisley shawls were known before Islam even existed. Cashmere shawls have been manufactured in Nepal and Kashmir for thousands of years. Famous shawls are the jamavar with the famous paisley pattern. Mughals might introduced weavers and production on a larger scale.
The Roman Empire's royalty were fond of Cashmere by the way.
Shahtoosh is also a Persian name but the fabric used to be a part of Kashmiri culture too also before Islam.


http://www.styleforum.net/t/151607/shahtoosh-the-illegal-fabric

The finest Cashmere fabric in India is Shahmina.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahmina
Edited by IndianBoyz - 5/19/12 at 2:01am
post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

 Brits are Indians because they ruled India.

 

This flippant comment sums up all your posts here, this is all beyond your comprehension.

post #44 of 50
sorry I'm late
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by kashmir View Post

sorry I'm late

 

Fashionably so Sir.

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