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Bespoke: Multiple in-house tailors vs. One tailor who makes every aspect. Rarity? - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Too few people appreciate a finely sawed Purdey
post #17 of 27
Desmond Merrion noted.

Seems to demonstrate that however good his tailoring skills might be considered by some, he is not a decent sort - to put it very mildly in the politest English terms. There can be no possible reason to possess that armoury.
post #18 of 27
My understanding is that some of the Hong Kong tailoring operations still work like this - where one man completes a suit from start to finish (though obviously multiple tailors work under one house). I'm not sure which firms do this, but the fellows at The Armoury will probably be able to answer this for you.
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

My understanding is that some of the Hong Kong tailoring operations still work like this - where one man completes a suit from start to finish (though obviously multiple tailors work under one house). I'm not sure which firms do this, but the fellows at The Armoury will probably be able to answer this for you.

I would have guessed that all those guys were far to efficient (out of necessity) for that.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

no possible reason to possess

Agree, there is a finality to sawed off shotguns that should be left to professionals rather than aficionados. I spend a part of my life helping a few back from gun shot wounds, but never from that kind of shotgun (they never make it to the door of help).

Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

one man completes a suit from start to finish

Even with operations where there is a specialist coat maker, trousers maker, waistcoat maker, etc., the operation of the finisher is rare indeed (kinda like the specialist closing pitcher in baseball). One can have a great coat made but if the finishing (e.g. buttonholes) are not up to snuff, the coat can come off as less than satisfying.

It's like a scar after an operation. That is all the patient sees and extrapolates in their mind about what's underneath, which may or may not be reflected in reality by what is on the surface.

-M
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post

^ The proper term is "afficionado."
- M
(Although the sawed off one would have taken it to the next level where people would be looking for you.)

You mean Aficionado
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander View Post

Well let's see

 

The guy in the second video makes bespoke suits but buys his in Zara... confused.gif

post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
I find those videos hilarious. Yes, they obviously know how to make a suit properly. Nice hand work, etc... But their suits look like crap. What the heck was the guy in the second video thinking with such a low gorge yet high button stance? Those black threaded button holes look horrendous too. I guess we can just chalk it up to poor taste. He looks like a clown in that suit.

And about the first guy, Popradi, his suits are incredibly ugly and poorly fitted to the wearers. http://www.rudolfpopradi.com/photo_gallery.html

Honestly, when it comes down to it, I don't care so much how a suit's made as much as I care how it looks. Of course some things that make a great suit, drape for example, can only be got by making a suit well.

Still, if those videos are representative of what one man tailoring outfits produce, I don't want to order a suit from a one man tailoring outfit.

Then again, Jeffrey from http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/ obviously knows how to make every part of a suit and his creations are lovely.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

My understanding is that some of the Hong Kong tailoring operations still work like this - where one man completes a suit from start to finish (though obviously multiple tailors work under one house). I'm not sure which firms do this, but the fellows at The Armoury will probably be able to answer this for you.

At least my man does this.
post #25 of 27

Musicguy

 

First of all you are not my customer and therefore have never worn one of my suits. All of  my customers are repeat customers who have been with me for may years and are willing to wait months for one of my true Bespoke suits. I am booked months in advance.  Many of my customers in New York city who know style and quality are very happy with the quality, craftsmanship and outstanding customer service. On Styleforum you can read one of the blogs from NYCsuitaddict who was very satisfied customer.       

   

 

Therfore from your comments it seems that your intention is to ruin my reputation.  Secondly you are very rude to Mr. Westmancott and myself. I am not sure who you are, how you were raised or what you do as a living, but there are other ways to give your comments without being rude and nasty.    

 

Rudolf Popradi, Bespoke Tailor

Montreal, Canada  tailoring_03.JPG  

post #26 of 27
Well actually this business is all about outsourcing especially in England. Tailors earn more by the piece so its very rare for them to be salaried and work in house unless they have equity in the business, they are the owner or they are paid a very, very large salary. An average Savile Row firm will only have 2 actual dedicated tailors on the payroll (although they may have much more in terms of support staff) and of course these guys make a lot of suits. I also know some Savile Row firms with no tailors on the payroll and these aren't the fake bespoke houses.

Bespoke suits, that is English ones of a high calibre, are nearly always made by a team of tailors, I have never met a tailor in England that makes his suits from start to finish.

Italian tailors did make things from start to finish because they were traditionally smaller mom and pop style companies. They would have smaller overheads but limited capacity.

My Bespoke suits are actually made by 3 Bespoke tailors in NYC and they make one suit from start to finish each although to my specification and house style, this is quite unusual. This is not an ideal situation as it takes each one a week to make one suit so capacity is limited and this is why real Bespoke in NYC is so rare/expensive across the board. If I had the infrastructure that London has I would certainly use separate cutters, coat makers, trouser makers etc.

All this being said my problems or how these things are made are not important. I think what is important is that they are made, that they are of a high standard and that the people involved are fairly compensated.
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
I have no malicious intentions, Rudolf. I'm just commenting on what I see.

For what it's worth, I just took another look at your website. Your suits don't look nearly as bad as I remember. Rather, the stylistic choices you chose are what bother me the most. I prefer much more open quarters, slimmer arms and shoulders that don't extend beyond the natural shoulder.

On to Westmancott... This is a difficult one. The suit he chose to wear in that video is so ugly, it's difficult for me to see beyond that. I wouldn't feel comfortable commissioning a suit from him.

Reread what I wrote. It's not as bad as you thought. Don't take things so personally.

Welcome to StyleForum and I wish you many years of success.
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