or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › The SW&D Intellectual Masturbation Station
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The SW&D Intellectual Masturbation Station - Page 7

post #91 of 107
Maybe this thread could use a (brief?) revival? Rft has seen its fair share of non-fashion-related discussion lately...


In any case, can anyone tell me if they've had experience reading Harold Bloom? Or, more precisely, would anyone enthusiastically recommend (or recommend against) reading The Anxiety of Influence?
post #92 of 107
I've never read Anxiety, but I've read some other Bloom stuff. I read The Best Poems of the English Language during that two-year poetry immersion I mentioned and I've read a chunk of Hamlet, Poem Unlimited, plus random tidbits here and there. Honestly, I find Bloom really obnoxious. I get the impression a lot of the time that he's more interested in talking than communicating, if that makes sense. He tends to make these grandiose, cryptic statements (see any time he talks about Hart Crane or Walt Whitman, even more so talking about Hamlet). You should go sit in a Barnes&Noble and read the beginning of it and see if you're into it.
post #93 of 107

I'd simply watch some youtube interviews of him. Bloom is certainly a genius, if one can say that about a critic, however, his views do tend to be polarizing in that they seem rooted in a kind of traditionalism that one either accepts or rejects. That being said I've never read an entire book of his, just various forwards, commentaries and critiques. On Proust for example he is untouchable.
 

post #94 of 107
His canon list is a life-saver. Or a time-saver, take your pick.
post #95 of 107
Thanks for the input. I don't know if I'll be able to start reading his stuff anytime soon, but what you've mentioned (kinda obnoxious, brilliant, polarizing) sounds like what my friends have, at one point or another, tried to tell me. Maybe I'll have time to read him in the fall; but for now I've got other things to do, which, by the way, reminds me of another question:

Wtf is going on in Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus? I haven't read Freud or Marx's original texts (only secondary stuff, like Lacan, Zupancic, Zizek, Derrida, etc.), but it feels like what they are writing is wholly beyond the scope of rational thought. I just... I have no idea what they mean to say when they say: "Judge Schreber has sunbeams in his ass. A solar anus." Or: "The process as process of production extends into the method as method of inscription."

And terms like the "body without organs?" Fuck me...
post #96 of 107

I know a lot of you have read these but I've been enjoying DFW's essays / short stories lately -

 

http://harpers.org/media/pdf/dfw/HarpersMagazine-1998-10-0059714.pdf

post #97 of 107
As a primer for Heidegger, you can read some of Walter Kauffman (or is it Kaufmann?) where he generally tears Heidegger to shreds but gives some starting points about his positions.
post #98 of 107
Read a good amount of Nietzsche, will make Heidegger make a little more sense.
post #99 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by infoleather View Post

I have been interested in Heidegger, but I like the desire to actually read Heidegger.

 

Check out Being-In-The-World by Hubert Dreyfus. He provides the context which makes Heidegger understandable. Once you understand what Heidegger is attempting to do, the tradition in which he is doing it, and his ridiculous coinages and obscure uses of existing language, Being In Time becomes remarkably clear, though still maybe tedious.

 

There are also plenty of free web resources which are helpful. Two lecture series, by Dreyfus, on Being and Time are available for free. Dreyfus also did an interview with Brian Mcgee on the subject of Husserlian and Heideggerian phenomenology. The Partially Examined Life did a fun podcast on Heidegger which is also pretty good.

post #100 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewRyanWallace View Post

Read a good amount of Nietzsche, will make Heidegger make a little more sense.

Or just read Neitzsche instead. After him, Heidegger will probably seem overly wordy and kinda boring.
post #101 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cacatfish View Post


Or just read Neitzsche instead. After him, Heidegger will probably seem overly wordy and kinda boring.

 

If you think the Big H is long-winded, you should try Sloterdijk...

post #102 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

If you think the Big H is long-winded, you should try Sloterdijk...

I think he meant that Nietzsche, unlike say Kant or Heidegger, cares very much about style in the literary sense and has a great deal of it.
post #103 of 107
fwiw: on truth and lies in a non-moral sense for something that sings. anything Heidegger if you want thoughts as far away from komisch as possible. Stanislaw Lem for another quality sci fi author.
post #104 of 107
Someone suggest me a good book collection filled with modern art and essays. Was just looking at Marcel Duchamp paintings and I really want just, like, a book filled with that shit. But with many artists.
post #105 of 107
this series, published by afterall books, seems very good. i can't vouch for the one on 'etant donnes' but the two i've read, 'blow job' and 'la jetee' were really worthwhile.

http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/browse/browse.asp?btype=8&pid=5
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › The SW&D Intellectual Masturbation Station