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The SW&D Intellectual Masturbation Station - Page 6

post #76 of 107

Does anyone else ever wish they had synesthesia?

post #77 of 107
after reading so much about it I really do wonder what it's like. In Speak, Memory Nabokov does a good job of describing his. there are some people who theorize that synesthesia is an overactive version of the same process that allows us to form and understand metaphors. not sure I totally buy that, but it's fun to think about.
post #78 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevier View Post

So, I hope you don't me derailing this slightly with a question: has anybody read "The language of fashion" by Roland Barthes? Is it interesting/insightful? Is it accessible to some with a minimal background continental philosophy or post-structuralism?

It is a structuralist work and quite a tedious read, if you want to read Barthes going from structuralism to post-structuralism or at least an aknowledgment of subjectivity get S/Z.
post #79 of 107

I have a friend that has auditory-visual synesthesia one example he gives of this is that when someone rings his doorbell he sees something like yellow lightning.  Relating to the mary's room experiment, he did not discover his synesthesia until he was 12-13 years old until then he thought that everyone experienced the world same him, without thinking does everyone else see yellow lightning everytime a doorbell rings.  In a way he is like mary in that his perception of the world is different than 99% of people yet through dialogue he has an understanding of how everyone else experiences the world.

post #80 of 107
eh, video kinda sucks actually. this is more relevant:
Quote:
What is synesthesia? Can the brain see music and hear light?

Synesthesia is an interesting neural interaction whereby individuals who express it “mix” their senses. Experts estimate that there are perhaps over 50 kinds of synesthesic combinations. The classical example of synesthesia involves individuals who can see numbers or letters in color. Another is one we depict in the exhibition with two sculptures, one with pointy ends looking like a spiked snowflake and the other with smooth rounded features. One of the sculptures is named Bouba and the other Kiki. Which is which? Most people who go through the exhibition associate Kiki with the sharp- edged sculpture and Bouba with the rounded one. This is because the sense of sound and sight are intermixed even in humans without extreme synesthesia. Throughout history there have been extreme cases of synesthesia where composers or artists associated colors with music, or taste with shapes. Brain: The Inside Story highlights Alexander Scriabin, whose synesthetic mixing of musical notes and colors led to perhaps the first musical light show as a result of the invention of a color organ on which some of Scriabin’s compositions were played.
http://www.amnh.org/news/2011/06/3972/

The Bouba and Kiki example is interesting because it seems that people associate Kiki with the "sharp" image and Bouba with the "round, soft" image regardless of their culture, language, age, whatever, suggesting something inherent to the brain and not learned.
Edited by pickpackpockpuck - 5/16/12 at 1:40pm
post #81 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by smashwindow View Post

I have a friend that has auditory-visual synesthesia one example he gives of this is that when someone rings his doorbell he sees something like yellow lightning.  Relating to the mary's room experiment, he did not discover his synesthesia until he was 12-13 years old until then he thought that everyone experienced the world same him, without thinking does everyone else see yellow lightning everytime a doorbell rings.  In a way he is like mary in that his perception of the world is different than 99% of people yet through dialogue he has an understanding of how everyone else experiences the world.

 

I have this though it was stronger when I was younger, now it's more like color associations.  It helps me remember things sometimes. 'That person's name was red.'

 

I thought everyone's brain worked like this until I took a state testing exam in 8th grade and one of the essays was about synesthesia.

post #82 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrz View Post

anyone read house of leaves? its perfect pomo jerkoff material

 

Ugh that book is awful, I don't really mind books that aren't terribly intellectual but this one tries to be metaphorical and deep with the subtlety of a sledgehammer.

post #83 of 107

That's Danielewski, right? I've seen another book of his which you have to flip around (as in the whole book) every page to read, even called it only revolutions... A girl in one of my literature classes went on and on about it uhoh.gif

post #84 of 107
whoops wrong thread.

Has anyone read road to perdido?
post #85 of 107
I skimmed a bit of House of Leaves at the library. Seemed gimmicky.
post #86 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by chion View Post

That's Danielewski, right? I've seen another book of his which you have to flip around (as in the whole book) every page to read, even called it only revolutions... A girl in one of my literature classes went on and on about it uhoh.gif
house of leaves is different from only revolutions. mind you, i read both of these in high school so its been awhile, but i think its a fun satire of academic writing. i suppose i always thought of danielewski's work as fucking with people moreso than any sort of serious intellectual thought. i've recommended it to a lot of friends who aren't really "philosophy types" and they've enjoyed it.

here's a pretty good review: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2000/jul/15/fiction.reviews

i guess it could be called gimmicky - i guess i just like the way he plays with text/footnotes/references though.
post #87 of 107
Existence well what does it matter?
I exist on the best terms I can.
The past is now part of my future,
The present is well out of hand.
post #88 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrz View Post


house of leaves is different from only revolutions. mind you, i read both of these in high school so its been awhile, but i think its a fun satire of academic writing. i suppose i always thought of danielewski's work as fucking with people moreso than any sort of serious intellectual thought. i've recommended it to a lot of friends who aren't really "philosophy types" and they've enjoyed it.
here's a pretty good review: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2000/jul/15/fiction.reviews
i guess it could be called gimmicky - i guess i just like the way he plays with text/footnotes/references though.

 

House of Leaves isn't just a single book of course... there are other connected texts and even music. It's altogether too clever for its own good, but fun all the same. A colleague of mine has written extensively on it, as well as other contemporary slipstream fictions like Steven Hall's The Raw Shark Texts, which makes House of Leaves look relatively simple.

 

Talking of slipstream, I very much recommend Christopher Priest's recent novel, The Islanders, which revisits the territory of his earlier work, The Dream Archipelago.

post #89 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

 

House of Leaves isn't just a single book of course... there are other connected texts and even music. It's altogether too clever for its own good, but fun all the same. A colleague of mine has written extensively on it, as well as other contemporary slipstream fictions like Steven Hall's The Raw Shark Texts, which makes House of Leaves look relatively simple.

 

Talking of slipstream, I very much recommend Christopher Priest's recent novel, The Islanders, which revisits the territory of his earlier work, The Dream Archipelago.

I think this post pretty much killed this thread, which is why I'm thankful for it.

post #90 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

 

House of Leaves isn't just a single book of course... there are other connected texts and even music. It's altogether too clever for its own good, but fun all the same. A colleague of mine has written extensively on it, as well as other contemporary slipstream fictions like Steven Hall's The Raw Shark Texts, which makes House of Leaves look relatively simple.

 

Talking of slipstream, I very much recommend Christopher Priest's recent novel, The Islanders, which revisits the territory of his earlier work, The Dream Archipelago.

 

House of Leaveis kinda fun to read, I guess, but it's gimmicky and poorly written.  The problem is that if you take it as just a novel, the writing sucks (why is the main character having teenage fantasy threesomes with hot women in every chapter?), and if you take it as satire of academic work, it misses the mark.  You could have done the same satire with a 20 page work, yet there's about 700 pages of fake footnotes that don't really contribute anything further to the 'satire.'  If you take it as some sort of creative way to arrange a novel, it hits you in the face with it and is about as clever as one of those 'choose your own adventure' books.

 

It appeals to and I think was targeted at high schoolers, so I don't really mind the book itself, just when people older than that try to tout it as some sort of literary achievement.  That review that was posted actually did a pretty good job with it.

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