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The SW&D Intellectual Masturbation Station - Page 4

post #46 of 107
Thread Starter 
my original post was unclear. i meant divorced from a political agenda. obviously political views inform the way in which someone writes about a subject, but that also doesn't mean that every theory has to have some sort of current political or social application. sometimes writing about napoleon's troop movements is just writing aout napoleon's troop movements.
post #47 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by thewho13 View Post

Uh, Teger, you can't divorce anything from the realm of politics as far as I know...

And why would you?
post #48 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urthwhyte View Post


Can you recommend a pretentious account of 20th century Western literary theory?


288
post #49 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLester View Post

where does SF fit?
gFCMC.png

SF occupies all but the lowest level.

Safety: Security of body, members who have recently lost a lot of weight or still in the process of doing so.

Love/Belonging: Most SF newbies. A sense of belonging, an exact replica of the SF uniform with the awkward pose. You spot these types on SF because they are so eager to rehash any advice they've read (but not actually experienced).

Esteem: Well known posters, people who actually like their sense of style and the direction their wardrobe is taking. They seek to please themselves but also like minded people they respect, probably due to the specificity of their tastes.

Self-actualization: swag/spezzratura/steeze
post #50 of 107
I'd actually recommend reading some Nietzsche, in particular, The Gay Science. While obviously not postmodernism, it's Nietzsche's most accessible book and provides a good introduction to some of the working theories of postmodernism (and can probably help you approach what exactly Foucault is doing--which is not simply documenting facts per se, but questioning how certain truth regimes emerged in different historical eras). And his aphorisms are much more enjoyable to read than most of the stale, academic work being suggested.

For those of you who have read Nietzsche, I would recommend Georges Bataille (The Accursed Share is good) or Gilles Deleuze (sorry to name drop).
post #51 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraphicNovelty View Post

I heard about that. I guess more phenomeonology? I've always been interested in Heidegger but i have like 0 desire to actually read Heidegger.


Heidegger is so hard to read that the German students who study him will often buy an English copy as well, just because they can't understand his German.

that said he's one of the most important continental philosophers, much more so than derrida/etc.

post #52 of 107

also I agree with teger that "postmodernism" as a period is mostly passed (though continental philosophy is obviously still extremely relevant).

computer is broken so, except for work, I've been spending a lot of time at the library. Anybody have any recommendations for shitty sci-fi or anything along those lines? I just finished A Fire Upon the Deep

post #53 of 107
As far as easily digestible and fun philosophy goes, nothing is better than Nietzsche. And every 20th century philosopher wrote footnotes on Nietzsche, whether they admitted to it or not. Although the Gay Science is my favorite from Nietzsche, I think The Genealogy of Morals is an easier read as it's more thesis driven and better structured over all. The Gay Science is less organized and reads like excerpts from the mind of a mad man. Excerpts from a brilliant mad man.

I'm a big fan of Schopenhauer too, and given that this forum is concerned with aesthetic appreciations, no better place to start than Schopenhauer (actually Kant too, of course). I recently finished a thesis on Schopenhauer, even though Nietzsche's my fave. Schopenhauer's writing is the most readable of the german idealists and is a good introduction to existentialism for those interested. The World as Will and Representation is a good place to start. If you want a more thorough understanding of his doctrine's, you should probably read his dissertation too. But for a general understanding, you can just read the world as will and representation and be just fine.

Camus is also brilliant and may be more accessible to those who haven't had much exposure to philosophy. I recommend the Plague, Myth of Sisyphus, and the Stranger (in that order).

I think I'm going to try to read some Barthes this summer. And maybe reread Walter Benjamin's essays? We'll see. I should probably read heidegger but I just can't get into it.
post #54 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrida26 View Post

also I agree with teger that "postmodernism" as a period is mostly passed (though continental philosophy is obviously still extremely relevant).


computer is broken so, except for work, I've been spending a lot of time at the library. Anybody have any recommendations for shitty sci-fi or anything along those lines? I just finished A Fire Upon the Deep

Gibson's Neuromancer/The Sprawl Trilogy if you havent read it. I'm currently reading Virtual Light, which is the first book in The Bridge Trilogy. It's pretty much the same style without the substance of Neuromancer.
post #55 of 107
Along with Neuromancer, I would go for Snow Crash and The Diamond Age by Neil Stephenson. Cornerstones of Cyberpunk Sci Fi novels.
John Brunner's Stand On Zanzibar is great if you find it interesting that when he wrote it in 1968, he pretty much predicted Twitter.
post #56 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrida26 View Post

also I agree with teger that "postmodernism" as a period is mostly passed (though continental philosophy is obviously still extremely relevant).


computer is broken so, except for work, I've been spending a lot of time at the library. Anybody have any recommendations for shitty sci-fi or anything along those lines? I just finished A Fire Upon the Deep

We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
post #57 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dellath View Post

Along with Neuromancer, I would go for Snow Crash and The Diamond Age by Neil Stephenson. Cornerstones of Cyberpunk Sci Fi novels.
John Brunner's Stand On Zanzibar is great if you find it interesting that when he wrote it in 1968, he pretty much predicted Twitter.

this offends me. comparing snow crash to neuromancer is like comparing a kid's finger painting to the mona lisa. seriously though, snow crash is just 400 pages of some libertarian masturbatory fantasy. ugh.

also gibson other than the sprawl (and really other than neuromancer) sucks. pattern recognition was.. ok, but still not very good.

hrm good sci fi though. if you liked a fire upon the deep, vernor vinge has a bunch of other works in the same universe which are good.

also philip k dick. you should read pretty much everything he wrote - his short stories especially are excellent.

you should also check out stephen kings 'the running man' and 'the long walk.' just.. awesome.
post #58 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic1 View Post

As far as easily digestible and fun philosophy goes, nothing is better than Nietzsche. And every 20th century philosopher wrote footnotes on Nietzsche, whether they admitted to it or not. Although the Gay Science is my favorite from Nietzsche, I think The Genealogy of Morals is an easier read as it's more thesis driven and better structured over all. The Gay Science is less organized and reads like excerpts from the mind of a mad man. Excerpts from a brilliant mad man.
I'm a big fan of Schopenhauer too, and given that this forum is concerned with aesthetic appreciations, no better place to start than Schopenhauer (actually Kant too, of course). I recently finished a thesis on Schopenhauer, even though Nietzsche's my fave. Schopenhauer's writing is the most readable of the german idealists and is a good introduction to existentialism for those interested. The World as Will and Representation is a good place to start. If you want a more thorough understanding of his doctrine's, you should probably read his dissertation too. But for a general understanding, you can just read the world as will and representation and be just fine.
Camus is also brilliant and may be more accessible to those who haven't had much exposure to philosophy. I recommend the Plague, Myth of Sisyphus, and the Stranger (in that order).
I think I'm going to try to read some Barthes this summer. And maybe reread Walter Benjamin's essays? We'll see. I should probably read heidegger but I just can't get into it.

I know I should like walter benjamin more than I do, but he's really my least favorite of that circle.

does anyone here like karl korsch or jose ortega?
post #59 of 107
since Nietzsche, Schoppenhauer, and Camus are already recommended.. I highly suggest Dostoevsky.


also mind/body debate is pretty interesting, even old shit.

just avoid garbage like Berkeley/Leibniz
post #60 of 107
was burning chrome any good?
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