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Commissioning my First Briefcase - Page 4

post #46 of 71

Oops, thank you. Fixed it in my post as well.

post #47 of 71
Furo, what are the dimensions of your bag? Other than making it a double gusset, did you make any other custom changes? How did you change the inside pocket?
post #48 of 71
Thread Starter 
I had the inside pocket taken out altogether to make room for files and folders and notebooks

The other changes I highlighted in the op... I think my dimensions were about 11x16x5"
post #49 of 71
Very nice briefcase indeed.
post #50 of 71

Any updates?  How's it holding up?

post #51 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curated View Post

Any updates?  How's it holding up?

The case is holding up quite well, but the chicago screws have a tendency to loosen over time - so I'd recommend keeping a few in the bag in case one pops off and you lose it. They can be tightened easily w/ a screwdriver or even a dime. Ideally, they would stay tight, but I'm not sure how to improve this.
post #52 of 71

Maybe a little loctite on the screw?

post #53 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curated View Post

Maybe a little loctite on the screw?

That may actually work. Have you done this with screws that were used on leather? Because I worry about the bond being too tight... to the point of damaging the leather in the future if a screw needs to be loosened (to replace a strap or handle for instance).
post #54 of 71

The red loctite loosens up when you heat it to facilitate removal.

post #55 of 71

I haven't, but the one side screws into the other on the Chicago screw, correct?  I think that this would be less of an issue that if the thread touched the leather.  I'd apply the loctite, tighten it the amount you'd like, then leave it.  It should stay as intended.

post #56 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curated View Post

I haven't, but the one side screws into the other on the Chicago screw, correct?  I think that this would be less of an issue that if the thread touched the leather.  I'd apply the loctite, tighten it the amount you'd like, then leave it.  It should stay as intended.

Yes that's how the screw functions. Sounds like that loctite should do the trick, provided that the bond can be broken down the road without having to rip out both sides of the screw (not sure the heating method would work due to the leather proximity).
post #57 of 71

Hey guys,

 

I have yet to try Loctite on the screws on my bags, but it has been my suggestion for those who have asked. I include a few spare screws with each bag and let customers know that the leather will stretch and screws may loosen.

 

If you are wondering why I prefer the screws over rivets or other fasteners, it goes back to the Henry Ford/Leo Fender(the guitar guy) "interchangeable parts" philosophy first and foremost. If a strap breaks, it is much easier to just unscrew the screw and replace the strap. I also like they way they look, but this is a secondary concern.

 

I completely understand that it takes a different level of attention on the part of the user to know that you may have to tighten some screws after a few weeks, but this to me is akin to the type of specialized care given to raw denim, cordovan leather shoes, (or any quality leather product for that matter), and on and on. I would be happy to use rivets if a customer requested them, but I also feel that, for whatever it is worth, the Chicago screw set my products apart from others.

 

I appreciate all the comments, as it helps me to see opportunities for improvement in terms of the design and craft of my products. As I may have stated previously I have only been seriously involved in this craft for a couple of years, so I have much to learn.

 

Thanks, 

 

Chris Woodhead, builder

The Sawyer Cabinet Co.

post #58 of 71

Blue Loctite

 

 

Quote:
"Loctite® Threadlocker Blue 242® is designed for the locking and sealing of threaded fasteners which require normal disassembly with standard hand tools. The product cures when confined in the absence of air between close fitting metal surfaces. It protects threads from rust and corrosion and prevents loosening from shock and vibration. Loctite® Threadlocker Blue 242® is particularly suited for applications on less active substrates such as stainless steel and plated surfaces, where disassembly is required for servicing."

http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/t_lkr_blue/overview/Loctite-Threadlocker-Blue-242.htm

post #59 of 71
Thread Starter 

^

Thanks
post #60 of 71
Great thread, I am looking for a nice brown briefcase!
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