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Zuckerberg's Hoodie and what your clothing says about what you think of those around you - Page 5

post #61 of 98
Well at least he's maintaining his US Citizenship unlike Eduardo Saverin who has moved to Singapore and renounced his.

http://reason.com/blog/2012/05/11/facebook-co-founder-eduardo-saverin-beco
post #62 of 98
lurker[1].gif
post #63 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post


This is just plain wrong, even if it is a common misconception. Once you get out of the start-up world, suits are pretty commonplace in Silicon Valley, and they're not even that unusual around start-ups. SV salespeople mostly wear suits, even if they don't generally wear ties. The CEOs of my last two employers in SV (one an early stage start-up, the other a multi-billion dollar publicly traded giant) ALWAYS wear suits to meet with investors or analysts, and to speaking engagements. My current employer is somewhat famous for his pairing of business suits with gaudy sneakers. Whenever one of our people is appearing on stage, anywhere, he is in a suit, even if he is just the guy in the background running the slide deck. I always wear a suit to customer meetings.

 

People in sales, or people who came out of a certain (older) culture, sure. People from the engineering or design side? No. 

 

There's a small and growing group who likes to dress better, but it's by no means mainstream. There's a fine line that we're able to walk where people look at us funny. Jeans and a sportcoat is usually OK, but a suit if you're under 60 and not in sales or legal will get you funny looks.

 

The younger CEOs wear mostly jeans and t shirts, with the notable exception of Reed Hastings, who's always been a suit guy. Some of the older guys wear suits regularly, though what I see 99% of the time is some variation of button down and khakis, or sportcoat over t shirt and jeans. Oh, and there's always the mock turtleneck crowd (Jobs, Ellison, etc.)

post #64 of 98

Funny how is other partner Eduardo Saverin always wear a suit.

post #65 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by aperson View Post


People in sales, or people who came out of a certain (older) culture, sure. People from the engineering or design side? No. 

There's a small and growing group who likes to dress better, but it's by no means mainstream. There's a fine line that we're able to walk where people look at us funny. Jeans and a sportcoat is usually OK, but a suit if you're under 60 and not in sales or legal will get you funny looks.

The younger CEOs wear mostly jeans and t shirts, with the notable exception of Reed Hastings, who's always been a suit guy. Some of the older guys wear suits regularly, though what I see 99% of the time is some variation of button down and khakis, or sportcoat over t shirt and jeans. Oh, and there's always the mock turtleneck crowd (Jobs, Ellison, etc.)

Funny, but I thought we were discussing CEOS, not engineers. I am in sales, so obviously at's the side I see every day, including frequently meeting with CEOs and other senior execs of software startups. The statement I was responding to was that suits are unheard of in SV culture, and that's just plain wrong.

I think the Esquire blogger's analysis is dead on.
post #66 of 98
I dnt think MZ is trying to showcase anything. This is probably how he dresses for work and henwas at work. The only potrayal imo is the hoodie which I think plays an important role in facebooks culture.

Even if he is trying to signal anything, i think it works perfectly for him. The IPO is selling the MZ story and facebook's role in todays world. This with strong corporate goverance (the strength of which is debatable by many) is what investors want. This is what will see a rise in its IPO debut. As time passes by with conference calls, earnings estimates, outlook statements etc this would have to evolve into a corporate conservative type personality in order to maintain its financing capabilities. However, at present this is what i think is perfect for facebooks PR.


On a related topic, As many have posted on alt routes that couldve have been taken for fb's ipo, i dnt think its MZs call anymore. If I was an investor, I would leave MZ at the helm after the IPO contingent on the fact that he conforms to certain investor expectations. If not I would lobby for ousting him. i know ppl will put up the voting structure of fb as a wall, however once ur public there are unlimited amount of forces that could strangle you.
post #67 of 98
Oh, on the hoodie, there's now this advertized on my FB page: The executive Hoodie.

http://www.betabrand.com/west-coast-workwear/navy-executive-pinstripe-hoodie.html?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=exhoodie_news1&utm_campaign=ExHoodie

205

Brutal.

(especially brutal since I now see I wasn't the first to post this ha! Sorry for the repeat.)
post #68 of 98

At least it doesn't look as bad as the blazer-hoodie combo.

post #69 of 98
Stock is at 34 today.

Maybe he should have worn a suit.
post #70 of 98

At least he wore  suit to his wedding.

post #71 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesny View Post

At least he wore  suit to his wedding.

Obviously his wedding was more important than the IPO.
post #72 of 98

OR his bride forced him to wear one.

post #73 of 98
Stock dipped below $31. While I would love to be one to jump on the anti-hoodie bandwagon, I don't think the hoodie is the cause of the stock price's underperformance (although it sure doesn't help).

Social networking as a business model is bound to fail. The average user does not want their data mined by F500 companies, and they don't want to pay for their use of the 'free internet'. Comparisons to google aside, most people can learn to exist without FB. Anyone remember myspace...

Bottom line, when you are asking people to invest their money and their confidence in your company, show them you can run a business by at least showing some professionalism. No one would hire a financial consultant or real estate agent if they met in while wearing a rumpled sweatshirt or hoodie
post #74 of 98
FB has no long-term growth and revenue potential. All their money comes from advertising. They're toying with the idea of charging people to show up at the top of news feeds, and maybe some businesses will pay, but Twitter is still free.

I say good for them, though. They became millionaires off a site that boils down to people posting pictures of their ugly babies or people drunk chatting and trying to hook up with girls they haven't seen since high school.
post #75 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by TM79 View Post

FB has no long-term growth and revenue potential. All their money comes from advertising. They're toying with the idea of charging people to show up at the top of news feeds, and maybe some businesses will pay, but Twitter is still free.
I say good for them, though. They became millionaires off a site that boils down to people posting pictures of their ugly babies or people drunk chatting and trying to hook up with girls they haven't seen since high school.

Analytics. It's not just advertizing, though they can give advertisers a lot of unique feedback and engage target audiences in new ways. But they're working on ways to figure out and predict trends in just about everything. How much money is it worth to a movie studio if a company can tell them exactly what plot and setting is going to bring in the best response from very targeted demographics? Now what if you can even tell them what soundtrack is going to make them more likely to buy the item you're focusing product placement around?

On the other end of that, what if you could buy information telling you exactly what demographics are using the product you make? For example, take the thinkpad. Very popular among the predictable set: businesspeople, institutional clients and whatnot. Lenovo, doing traditional market research, sees that the typical client is a business buying computers for their office setting, keeping them 2-3 years.

But say you have a website that attracts a huge portion of the global population, and you can log the exact model of computer that visits, the OS they're using, what browser... All of a sudden, you have a near perfect picture of what the product you've put out there is doing. You can see every 6 year old thinkpad (like one of mine) beating around out there, see exactly who's using it in terms of lifestyle, income, values, interests, and you can see what software the user has running, you can see if they've upgraded the OS, you may even be able to see if any of the system internals have been replaced with a friendly bit of spyware or two.

They're gathering far more information on you than just what colors you like and what your hobbies are. They're gathering a lot of data that isn't particularly interesting to you, nor particularly sensitive, but that companies may very well pay out the nose for. They're still working on gearing that side of the business up, and that's why people are betting on them.
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