or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › Protein supplements
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Protein supplements

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I've always been very serious about athletics, and devoted (occasionally fanatical) to weightlifting and working out.  For whatever reason, though, I've never been a supplement guy.  I dabbled in creatine for a while, but wasn't a big fan.  Other than that, it's been au naturel. I've given some thought lately to moderate use of protein shakes/bars/supplements.  Here are my things to consider: - I'm trying to maintain lean, well-defined muscle.  As has been mentioned in this forum many times, think Tyler Durden in Fight Club (or, at biggest, a Mens Health cover model) as the archetype or the ideal physique.  Understanding that protein helps add muscle (which in turn adds weight), I'd still like not to pack on too much bulk as I'm happy at my current weight. - I work out late during weekdays (9pm-11pm) because of job time constraints.  I'm usually hungry when I'm through and, if it were earlier, would be inclined to eat.  I have friends that take protein supplements after workouts, but I'm not sure if doing so shortly before bed is advisable. - The less supplementation, the better.  One shake or bar or something clustered around my workout would be the ideal. So, the question to all of you (Buddah and GQ Lawyer come to mind, but I know there's others) is whether you'd recommend a particular protein supplement that meets these criteria.  Or do my timing and not-too-much-bulk considerations mean it's better to avoid protein supplements altogether?  Thanx in advance.
post #2 of 27
I definitely recommend supplementing weightlifting with protein.  Unless you eat an unusually large amount of chicken and fish during the day, you probably aren't getting enough protein through solid foods and your hard work in the gym is going to waste.  I wouldn't worry about putting on too much bulk as long as you avoid those "weight gainer" protein products.  I work out 5-6 times a week (alternating weights and cardio), drink a protein shake every day, and was only recently able to break 170 lbs. (I am 5'10".) Protein is best consumed right after a workout.  I assume that you are going to bed soon after working out.  Because you won't be eating again for awhile, I would recommend a slow absorption protein, like casein, which is found in MetRx products.  Or you might want to look into the new "nighttime" proteins (such as SomnaBol) that are advertised in various fitness magazines.  I've had decent results with these (although I'm not sure whether it, or the other supplements I'm taking, should get the credit for any improvement).  They are very expensive, however. I recommend, if at all possible, that you consider working out in the morning.  I made the switch a few months ago.  At the beginning it was awfully tough to get up early, but it really kick starts my day now.  And I don't have to worry about missing a workout when I'm working late at the office on a brief that needs to get filed the next day.  
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input, Ambulance.  Funny you should mention the morning workout:  I posted about that some time ago, asking about those who were able to drag their asses out of bed at the crack of dawn.  I certainly admire those (like you ) who can do it, but I've never been a big morning person.   I've been out of school for a few years now, but I'm still on college/law school time and just can't seem to get to bed earlier than 12-12:30 p.m. every night.  I'd love to work out early to get it done with, so that no excuses develop during the day to skip it.  But I have enough trouble just waking up for work each day.  Plus, I often go the gym with my wife and she's even worse in the mornings, so I'd have to carry her in over my shoulder. What time do you go to the gym in the a.m.?  And when do you get to work/leave work/go to bed on an average day?  I'm wondering how others are able to swing this morning workout.  I usually get to work about 8:30, leave at 7:30 or so, work out at 9, and get to bed by 12:30.  That's about the best schedule I've been able to figure out so far.
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 
Anyone else with similar job/workout schedules, I'd be interested to hear from you, too.
post #5 of 27
I'm up @ 5 am to do my cardio, Go to work at 6:30. If I miss cardio in the morning I'll run at lunch. As soon as I get off work I head to the gym to lift. Right Now I'm lifting M-W-F-S and doing sprints and plyometrics on Tuesdays and Thursdays to rehab my knee.
post #6 of 27
I go to bed at 11 every night unless there is a major sporting event on.  I wake up at 6:30 and am in the gym by 7 (I work out in my overpriced apartment building's gym, which isn't great, but does the job and is a lot quicker than going out).  My workout is fairly short -- 30 to 40 minutes, including warm up.  If I'm lifting, I do 5-6 different lifts of 3 sets each.  No more than 2-3 body parts each session.  If I'm doing cardio, it's usually 30 minutes on a treadmill. After working out, I drink a protein shake made of whey protein (right now I'm using a combination of MethoxyPro and 100% Whey, vanilla flavored), a banana, milk, crushed ice, honey, and creatine.  Definitely not Dairy Queen quality, but it doesn't taste half bad.  I make sure to eat a big bowl of oatmeal as well.  After eating, showering, shaving, and going through my skin care routine I am out the door between 9:15 and 9:30 and in the office about 25 minutes later.  Pathetically inefficient, I know. I would definitely try the morning routine for one week.  Force yourself to get out of bed and drink a cup of black coffee or take a thermogenic like Hydroxycut.  If it doesn't work out, you can go back to the evening workouts.
post #7 of 27
I have found that if I don't workout in the morning, the excuses build all day why I should skip in the evening. So, I have forced myself to workout in the morning (after 2 weeks of bitching your why through, it will become second nature to get up) even though I still can't force myself into bed before midnight). I am up at 5:30 and in the gym by 6 (after eating a bagel and a banana). I lift until 7, run until 7:30 and am back home by 7:45. I do this Monday - Saturday (Sat. = 6:30 run around the golf course, and then 18 holes). and take Sunday off.
post #8 of 27
One option to doing your entire workout in the morning is a version of my schedule: I'm in bed by 10:30, up by 6, running by 6:30 the latest for about 40 min on an empty stomach. Egg whites and some kind of whole grain after my run, or if in a hurry 44 grams of whey protien and a banana. Prepare 3 more small meals for when at work, shower, etc. and to work by 8:30. After work I'll hit the weights for a little over an hour 4 times a week. Cardio is done for the day, I get an energy boost and am only at the gyn for an hour, leaving time for a life. If it's too cold or I'm too lazy to run in the morning, I'll do it after the weights, which to me is the next best time. Hope this helps.
post #9 of 27
What kind of small meals do you prepare for the office?
post #10 of 27
Typically, my routine is something like this: 7:30 big breakfast of egg whites and whole grain toast or oatmeal. 10:30 whey protein shake w/ glutamine. 1:30 mixed greens salad of some kind with either tuna or grilled chicken breast and my own dressing. 4:30 fat free cottage cheese and some baby carrots or soy nuts. 7:00 whey protein shake w/ glutamine and 1/2 banana. 8:30 small piece of lean meat or fish/shrimp and some veggies. Sometimes I'll skip the second shake if my protein and calorie intake is adequate for the day and I'm getting right home to make dinner, but I make sure to eat very soon after training and get enough protein and carbs. Things like peanuts, leftover veggies, cottage cheese, protein bars, shakes, etc. are all good for work. We have a full-sized fridge so I usually cook enough things over the weekend (soups, stews, chili) that are easy to just "nuke" at work. You won't believe how much better you'll feel when your metabolism is burning all day. Plus, you're actually eating more food, but taking in far fewer calories than 90% of the people who eat three (usually unhealthy) meals a day. Cheers.
post #11 of 27
Get your protein from the plant world. Concentrated proteins are harmful. Read some of my other posts. l built muscle using pre-digested vegetable proteins.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Get your protein from the plant world. Concentrated proteins are harmful. Read some of my other posts. l built muscle using pre-digested vegetable proteins.
Where is your basis for these assertions about protein shakes being harmful? I myself have asked my internal medicine doctor, who also specializes in hematology, about taking protein shakes and weight gainers and he said those are just fine. This was after reviewing my results of a blood test which came back with no cause for concern, and I've been taking those things for 2+years. Please explain. Kevin
post #13 of 27
l seriously question your doctor. What did these blood tests actually test for? l get the feeling that blood alkalinity wasn't tested. Did they test your blood for over 20 minerals....l dought it. Does this hematologist have any financial interests in protein supplement companies? The consumption of protein powders affect the natural blood balance. The research has been done. l have an office full of files. You do a bit of work and do some research. l have enough to do. l have given you some info, now it's your turn to act. As l have said in various posts before: be careful of what people tell you about heath, especially medical/heath people. (This is because they are usually trained with silly and useless ideas. Health people have too much pride to ever change from their treatments). These medical people have an appalling record in keeping people healthy in old age. Time to listen to people who actually understand how food lifestyle affects the balance of the human body. (Balance = blood, spiritualness, etc).
post #14 of 27
Quote:
l seriously question your doctor. What did these blood tests actually test for? l get the feeling that blood alkalinity wasn't tested. Did they test your blood for over 20 minerals....l dought it. Does this hematologist have any financial interests in protein supplement companies? The consumption of protein powders affect the natural blood balance. The research has been done. l have an office full of files. You do a bit of work and do some research. l have enough to do. l have given you some info, now it's your turn to act. As l have said in various posts before: be careful of what people tell you about heath, especially medical/heath people. (This is because they are usually trained with silly and useless ideas. Health people have too much pride to ever change from their treatments). These medical people have an appalling record in keeping people healthy in old age. Time to listen to people who actually understand how food lifestyle affects the balance of the human body. (Balance = blood, spiritualness, etc).
Hahahahaa.... wtf are you talking about?  Does my hematologist have financial interest in protein companies?  Yeah dude, he's slangin' protein powder out of the trunk of his Escalade after office hours... my 65 year old doctor just signed a big supplement deal with EAS and he's trying to get his cut by telling me they're ok to take...   ...  Oh yeah, and really sound advice to ignore people in the medical profession.  They always have hidden agendas and their advice should be taken with a grain of salt... *rolls eyes*...  And by the way my blood test did check for all of the things you mentioned.  I have a copy of it in front of me at this moment.  So once again any hard evidence of your claims, which so far have been nothing but fallacious arguments by assertion, would be welcome.  Post a link or some research you have seen on the internet or in magazines.   Kevin
post #15 of 27
F4iryder: be very careful what you say. Drug and supplement companies are highly influencial mega huge companies. Not all doctors are bought but we don't know which ones are and which ones are not. 4 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT TRUST DOCTORS 1.The advice they usually offer is not conductive to good health. 2. Doctors have the poorest health and live the shortest out of all professional people in civilized nations. 3. Many doctors are drug abusers especially surgeons. These people are expected to work public holidays and long hours (a whole week-end sometimes); how do you think they keep awake. Numerous deaths have been reported by Coroners about doctor overdoses. Why do you think the media is always reporting insidents where doctors perform operations and chop off the wrong breast, arm, leg etc. Going to hospital is the 4th leading cause of death in the U.S.A. 4. The people who live furthest away from medical help live the healthiest and longest. Now F4iryder14: what minerals did the doctor test for??? What was the balance of the blood? (l have no right to ask but, l would love to know the results of each mineral test. From all the things you have told me, l bet you were deficient in many minerals. l really do hope that you were tested for [over 20 minerals as you said]. l will be posting afew references and studies when l look them up everyone. P.S: Very soon l will be posting a full report that will explain why we should never visit or trust a doctor. l will bring forth very well researched arguements why doctors are the worst people to ask for health advice. P.S.S: even though you all may be highly ignorant of health issues [given the rediculous reponses l have read]; there is still alot of hope for you gentlemen. l find it promising and encouraging that you are starting to ask questions; at least that's a start. Please: be very careful not to make judgements in what you read before you find out the facts. Just because something may seem strange and way out, it doesn't mean that it is. lt is all the more reason to check things out. Don't be like NavyStyles who just laughs and nods his head: keep an open mind, be intelligent and check out the research, scientific testing and studies. REQUEST Resist the temptation to act ignorantly and don't role your eyes until you have analysed the details. P.S.S: sorry about the large pictures; they do serve an important purpose though. This will become evident in a couple of months.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Health & Body
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › Protein supplements