or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › 1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or underemployed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or underemployed - Page 6

post #76 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

To throw a serious reply in here:
I actually went to two different state schools. For grad school, I went to a huge state school with a big party culture (Playboy's #1 party school one year lolol), and it absolutely had a lower quality of education for undergrads than where I went for my undergrad studies. But yeah, there are plenty of great state schools and they're a freaking bargain compared to the top private schools.
Oddly enough my undergrad public school used to be an Ivy and withdrew. Still have a standing invitation IIRC, but would mean going private and rejoining their athletic conference.
Did you go to Arizona State or something? But I think colleges like that are an exception, not a rule, especially at the state level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by junior varsity View Post

I support a system where house, car, and education should not be financed... With current prices staying the same... It would push a lot of kids to go to trade school so we don't pay $100/hr for a plumber and $80/hr for a car mechanic.
America's over utilization of credit is a major issue. Yes it gives many people opportunities but it's a double edged sword that no one wants to admit.
There should be talent and merit based state provided grants for the genius level kids who are truly gifted
Need based grants should be eliminated and affirmative action should be also diminished.
In my opinion, this is the best way to reform the education system
Don't buy a beamer and then bitch about the beamer's maintance costs. It's not exactly an industry secret that luxury cars are more expensive to maintain and repair.

And what happens when all these people pay to go to trade school and the market is now saturated with plumbers all vying for a $10/hour job fixing a clogged toilet somewhere? There aren't enough trade positions if you shift everyone that is getting a shitty degree into trade school right now.
post #77 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post

Did you go to Arizona State or something? But I think colleges like that are an exception, not a rule, especially at the state level.
Don't buy a beamer and then bitch about the beamer's maintance costs. It's not exactly an industry secret that luxury cars are more expensive to maintain and repair.
And what happens when all these people pay to go to trade school and the market is now saturated with plumbers all vying for a $10/hour job fixing a clogged toilet somewhere? There aren't enough trade positions if you shift everyone that is getting a shitty degree into trade school right now.

I never complain how much my be costs to run. I know the rule called pay to play.

To put on a tire or fix a broken toilet doesn't require true intellectual competence... It's a trade that anyone who chooses to learn can do.
Hence why it should be priced at $10-20 an hour... And that's what the a realistic portion of any society should do - instead of outsourcing all the undesirable jobs to the Hispanict immigrants.

You can't have a society with people all vying for white collar jobs. That's how you end up with the current situation - grads with no placement. There must be a blue collar class that accepts their fate as blue collar workers.

I agree tha over the yearst America has exploited the working class to the point that a factory worker or whatever cannot provide for hs family anymore but that's not the point of this discussion.
post #78 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post

Did you go to Arizona State or something? But I think colleges like that are an exception, not a rule, especially at the state level.
University of Georgia. I know there are a ton of good state schools, including the larger ones, but enough of the big state schools are huge party meccas to support the stereotype.
post #79 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

University of Georgia. I know there are a ton of good state schools, including the larger ones, but enough of the big state schools are huge party meccas to support the stereotype.

I think once schools start to be less near cities and more their own city (e.g. private schools in the middle of nowhere) the school's partying goes up, since there's nothing to do. I don't have any hard statistics on this, but it's aligned with my experience and that of my friends. At the end of the day, every college will have its party-only crowd, and a study-only crowd.
post #80 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by junior varsity View Post

I support a system where house, car, and education should not be financed... With current prices staying the same... It would push a lot of kids to go to trade school so we don't pay $100/hr for a plumber and $80/hr for a car mechanic.
America's over utilization of credit is a major issue. Yes it gives many people opportunities but it's a double edged sword that no one wants to admit.
There should be talent and merit based state provided grants for the genius level kids who are truly gifted
Need based grants should be eliminated and affirmative action should be also diminished.
In my opinion, this is the best way to reform the education system
Quote:
Originally Posted by junior varsity View Post

I never complain how much my be costs to run. I know the rule called pay to play.
To put on a tire or fix a broken toilet doesn't require true intellectual competence... It's a trade that anyone who chooses to learn can do.
Hence why it should be priced at $10-20 an hour... And that's what the a realistic portion of any society should do - instead of outsourcing all the undesirable jobs to the Hispanict immigrants.
You can't have a society with people all vying for white collar jobs. That's how you end up with the current situation - grads with no placement. There must be a blue collar class that accepts their fate as blue collar workers.
I agree tha over the yearst America has exploited the working class to the point that a factory worker or whatever cannot provide for hs family anymore but that's not the point of this discussion.

If you don't want to spend $100/hr to "unplug a toilet" and it is super easy, do it yourself.
post #81 of 127
junior varsity you are fucking stupid.
post #82 of 127
also if ive learned anything from reading about the financial industry, it's that luck and timing has more to do with success than intelligence or 'skill'
post #83 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

also if ive learned anything from reading about the financial industry, it's that luck and timing has more to do with success than intelligence or 'skill'

I disagree. Luck has a big part to play if you are doing more "interesting" stuff in finance. The vast majority of stuff is lower risk, less interesting for journalists to write about, but still pays really well.
post #84 of 127
Related point, what's your definition of a "good" school? IMO, the only thing that matters about a school are:

1. What it's name is, and what prospective employers / other people think about your when they read that line on your resume.
2. The kinds of networking opportunities you are afforded for attending, whether it's from classmates, professors, or employers that recruit out of specific campuses.

The quality of education seems rather moot to me, almost to the point of not worth talking about. If you take any two large state schools, the quality of instruction is probably going to come out on par with each other for undergrad. I wouldn't expect the curriculum to vary much for the more "normal" majors. For something specific, like hotel management, or agriculture, there are specialty schools that will offer classes and resources which others can't, but for the most part, my impression is that quality of education is pretty consistent across schools.

JV may not be the most tactful poster, but his points:

1. an Ivy League school is a proxy to most people for a rigorous education
2. there are too many college grads competing for too many desk jobs

are more or less correct IMO.

Re: the thread title, I have no idea what underemployed means in this context.
New grads have no experience, and few applicable skills. How can they be underemployed for anything?
post #85 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

also if ive learned anything from reading about the financial industry, it's that luck and timing has more to do with success than intelligence or 'skill'

It seems to me that human nature tends to require the majority people believe financially successful people obtained their financial success due to external forces, and that if they themselves had just been in the right place at the right time, they too would be financially rewarded. Of course, if one is not prepared (educationally, work experience, etc.) to seize that moment, nothing happens.

It would be like me having the opportunity to get a prime placement in a History Ph.D. program. Someone could offer me the most rewarding slot ever and I would be ill prepared to take advantage of it.
post #86 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenanyu View Post

Re: the thread title, I have no idea what underemployed means in this context.
New grads have no experience, and few applicable skills. How can they be underemployed for anything?

Underemployed typically means that someone has a part-time job when they want a full-time job.
post #87 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

Underemployed typically means that someone has a part-time job when they want a full-time job.

Or employed in something that doesn't require their degree (or even A degree). For example, the college grad who is now a barista at starbucks.
post #88 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

It seems to me that human nature tends to require the majority people believe financially successful people obtained their financial success due to external forces, and that if they themselves had just been in the right place at the right time, they too would be financially rewarded. Of course, if one is not prepared (educationally, work experience, etc.) to seize that moment, nothing happens.
It would be like me having the opportunity to get a prime placement in a History Ph.D. program. Someone could offer me the most rewarding slot ever and I would be ill prepared to take advantage of it.

I think my post was really in particular about the financial industry, not about success in general. but piobaire has to be pio.
post #89 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

But then all the schools would be full of Asians... :shivers:
.
UC Irvine is already called university of Chinese immigrants. lol. Gotta hand it to them people though, when I drive out there I see how their parents are really hard workers, too bad their kids are turning into full blooded Americans in the bad sense....

Isn't this already the case? Every UC has an Asian majority except for Santa Cruz and Santa Barbara... even those are like 20% Asian. UMichigan is like 15-20% Asian, yet the state itself is probably comprised of less than 3% Asian. Out of the top tier of public schools, I think UVA is the only one that's somewhat insulated from the trend. I'd imagine its because A. not many Asians live in the south, B. UVA doesn't have the cachet in Asia that say, Cal or Michigan does (read: my immigrant parents won't have UVA on the radar for desirable college choices).

I'm sure the ethnic breakdowns will be even more lopsided over time.
post #90 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

It seems to me that human nature tends to require the majority people believe financially successful people obtained their financial success due to external forces, and that if they themselves had just been in the right place at the right time, they too would be financially rewarded. Of course, if one is not prepared (educationally, work experience, etc.) to seize that moment, nothing happens.
It would be like me having the opportunity to get a prime placement in a History Ph.D. program. Someone could offer me the most rewarding slot ever and I would be ill prepared to take advantage of it.

I think my post was really in particular about the financial industry, not about success in general. but piobaire has to be pio.

And teger has to be teger. Now I remember why I rarely edit myself when speaking to you...even when I do, such as the above, you have to insult.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › 1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or underemployed