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Interview: How to build an incredible mens wardrobe - Page 2

post #16 of 32
While I appreciate the effort on both parties to create the article, the advice given appears contradictory. He states not to dress better than (and intimidate) others and later encourages exploring and developing ones own style. I am unsure as to which conviction he is trying to convey.
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

While I appreciate the effort on both parties to create the article, the advice given appears contradictory. He states not to dress better than (and intimidate) others and later encourages exploring and developing ones own style. I am unsure as to which conviction he is trying to convey.

You can explore your own style without doing so in a price range three times above the norm. If everyone at your office wears BB shirts, and you're more into Thomas Pink, you will be following your own style in the same price category. How I translated his statement about staying around the same price category was basically you don't want to build a bunch of resentment from those you have to work with.
post #18 of 32
"Always be better dressed than they are."

Steve Martin said that and I believe it.
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrateCustomer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

While I appreciate the effort on both parties to create the article, the advice given appears contradictory. He states not to dress better than (and intimidate) others and later encourages exploring and developing ones own style. I am unsure as to which conviction he is trying to convey.

You can explore your own style without doing so in a price range three times above the norm. If everyone at your office wears BB shirts, and you're more into Thomas Pink, you will be following your own style in the same price category. How I translated his statement about staying around the same price category was basically you don't want to build a bunch of resentment from those you have to work with.

The article was very quietly political and confused (or deliberately sly) and suggested submission to the ignorance of others.
The gist of it was that all are equal, only some are more equal than others.
If my boss buys a house, cottage, car, boat and lover then good for him. If I enjoy to own the best clothing I can afford, then good for me. Everyone is happy. I don't tell my boss what to spend his money on and neither will he (or she) tell me what to spend my money on.
Unless one lives in a Communist, Fascist or Moslem country, one should not be confined by the stupidity or misplaced or perceived power of their peers, contemporaries, bosses or workmates. Obviously it would be a bad idea for a surgeon to wear a tuxedo in the operating room, but in an office there is a lot more leeway for expressive freedom. A good boss will be concerned more by an employees performance than his aspiring flamboyance. Sadly there are a lot of bad bosses out there who need to be told, 'take this job and shove it up your a$$.' .....ahh the good old days where slaves were few and treated a lot better. If people agree to be told what they can and cannot wear beyond reason, then they give up their freedom. Freedom isn't free. It has always and will always need to be fiercely protected and defended.
Edited by MyOtherLife - 4/26/12 at 12:32pm
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

The article was very quietly political and confused (or deliberately sly) and suggested submission to the ignorance of others.
The gist of it was that all are equal, only some are more equal than others.
If my boss buys a house, cottage, car, boat and lover then good for him. If I enjoy to own the best clothing I can afford, then good for me. Everyone is happy. I don't tell my boss what to spend his money on and neither will he (or she) tell me what to spend my money on.
Unless one lives in a Communist, Fascist or Moslem country, one should not be confined by the stupidity or misplaced or perceived power of their peers, contemporaries, bosses or workmates. Obviously it would be a bad idea for a surgeon to wear a tuxedo in the operating room, but in an office there is a lot more leeway for expressive freedom. A good boss will be concerned more by an employees performance than his aspiring flamboyance. Sadly there are a lot of bad bosses out there who need to be told, 'take this job and shove it up your a$$.' .....ahh the good old days where slaves were few and treated a lot better. If people agree to be told what they can and cannot wear beyond reason, then they give up their freedom. Freedom isn't free. It has always and will always need to be fiercely protected and defended.

I don't disagree with anything you just said; I was merely stating my interpretation of what the gentleman was saying. If I dressed the same as my coworkers, I'd be wearing pleated polyester pants, black dress shirts with the sleeves two inches too long, and a really nice pair of Cole Haan square toed galoshes that haven't been shined...ever.
post #21 of 32
cool blog.
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrateCustomer View Post

I don't disagree with anything you just said; I was merely stating my interpretation of what the gentleman was saying. If I dressed the same as my coworkers, I'd be wearing pleated polyester pants, black dress shirts with the sleeves two inches too long, and a really nice pair of Cole Haan square toed galoshes that haven't been shined...ever.

I agree and sorry for my rant. It is sad and frightening how much the public had been dumbed down. The article in question lacked clarity and this is what I was discontented about.
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

I agree and sorry for my rant. It is sad and frightening how much the public had been dumbed down. The article in question lacked clarity and this is what I was discontented about.

Apology accepted sir. I know what you mean though. High School is the biggest arena for fighting to be accepted by looking a certain way, wearing certain brands. You'd think we'd outgrow this at some point, but the popularity of Affliction t-shirts clearly prove otherwise.
post #24 of 32

I am always stunned how the Fascist moniker is always applied so casually to something believe to be both repugnant and that happens somewhere else.

 

You do understand, that by definition, a fascist country is one where the government seeks to control private property and enterprise by exercising full to limited rights of ownership [except certain rights of possession and transfer] of the same through strict regulation and control over commerce and the economy? This makes fascism a political kissing cousin of communism where the state goes the next step and assumes full rights of ownership of all private property and enterprise including rights of possession and transfer?

 

This means that most countries practice fascism of one form or another, and the good ol' US of A practices a highly rigid and effective form of fascism which most inhabitants choose not to realize as truth.

 

If this is not so, then pray tell how one might acquire allodial title in real estate under US jurisdiction and not fee simple title, with its very limited rights of possession [which most assume to be full rights of ownership, but are not] and also how one might engage in enterprise without first registering with and paying tribute to the de jure government of the US?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post


The article was very quietly political and confused (or deliberately sly) and suggested submission to the ignorance of others.
The gist of it was that all are equal, only some are more equal than others.
If my boss buys a house, cottage, car, boat and lover then good for him. If I enjoy to own the best clothing I can afford, then good for me. Everyone is happy. I don't tell my boss what to spend his money on and neither will he (or she) tell me what to spend my money on.
Unless one lives in a Communist, Fascist or Moslem country, one should not be confined by the stupidity or misplaced or perceived power of their peers, contemporaries, bosses or workmates. Obviously it would be a bad idea for a surgeon to wear a tuxedo in the operating room, but in an office there is a lot more leeway for expressive freedom. A good boss will be concerned more by an employees performance than his aspiring flamboyance. Sadly there are a lot of bad bosses out there who need to be told, 'take this job and shove it up your a$$.' .....ahh the good old days where slaves were few and treated a lot better. If people agree to be told what they can and cannot wear beyond reason, then they give up their freedom. Freedom isn't free. It has always and will always need to be fiercely protected and defended. [emphasis: mine]

 

 

post #25 of 32


the dreaded double post

post #26 of 32
Thread Starter 
Guys thank you so much for your comments. I really appreciate it. In first view it might looks like a little bit controversial interview but when you dig it's obviously not )

It's all about little psychology and good common sense as I think.

What do you think about theory to build your wardrobe around your suits?
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kappelan View Post

What do you think about theory to build your wardrobe around your suits?

This is good advice. Building outfits (shirts, ties, shoes) based on your suits is the way to go. If you do it well, you can use many of the components with different outfits. This is why whit and light blue shirts are so great. Their versatility allows them to go with just about everything else you have.

But why buy a tie that does not work with the suits/shirts that you own? Either buy the complimentary items that you need to go with it, or don't buy it.
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by chimchiminey View Post

Why are his top two shirt buttons undone? That is a sloven look.

Not really quite normal these days and indeed acceptable in informal circumstances.

Correct word is 'slovenly' by the way.
post #29 of 32

I think it makes sense and pretty much consistent in various info on the web.  You know, like start with the basics of navy, black, grey and shirts that can be mixed and matched then followed by shoes and so on.  I like his thoughts around keeping your wardrobe within the price range of your work environment...and choosing the right style to fit you and it does not have to be expensive. 

post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post


Not really quite normal these days and indeed acceptable in informal circumstances.
Correct word is 'slovenly' by the way.

 

Agree.  1 is more common and 2 not so much but would be the maximum.  Personally, I played with 1 or 2 and I prefer 2.

 

The definition of slovenly seems worst than what it is actually describing.  What I mean is this the appropriate word to describe someone with 2 buttons off or am i missing something here?  I am a Noob after all.   Any other thoughts on this?

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