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The Zam Barrett Thread - Page 10

post #136 of 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic1 View Post

^that's not a fair judgement. I can see the use of overlock stitching, which people credit to ccp for popularizing, but many brands are using it, not just zam. The pants and shirts and blazers or jacket don't refer to ccp other than what, a high collar, distressed leather? hard to give ccp that as "his." same thing with devoa. Just 'cause zam uses anatomical cuts doesn't mean he's ripping off devoa. Anatomical cuts have been huge for a while...have you seen athletic wear? It's more accurate to say devoa rips off ccp. don't get me wrong, I love devoa and ccp, but to say zam copies and rehashes them is just slanderous and inaccurate.

It's not slanderous to say something is derivative. Do you think an MC-er would be offended if you told him his suit looked like a Huntsman? If everyone could do that then noone would make the trip to Savile Row/Naples etc. It's a skill to be able to see what looks good in other designs and adopt them.

Brad et al are not "bitching" or moaning here so I don't really understand the commotion. I don't think anyone needs to justify taking inspiration from anyone esle. Just don't expect us all to sit round and commentate that it's revolutionary design or anything like that.
post #137 of 391
Quote:
“Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery - celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from - it’s where you take them to.”

Can you all stfu now? No one in here knows nothing including myself with the exception of Zam who at least puts his creativity to work. Everyone who is being critical seems to have some entitlement complex like their opinion is absolute. Get over yourself and go make something if you want to be OG

Great if you enjoy the work, if not and you got nothing nice to say, please keep your comments to yourself. Didn't your mother teach you anything?

Mother's Day is this Sunday, you know what to do.
post #138 of 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by futuresailors View Post

Zam, you have the civility of a saint.

 

Equating Zam's use of overlock stitching to ripping off CCP would be like saying (to StyleForum-ize it) "Petar Petrov uses straight stitching, he's ripping off Ervell!"

It's a construction technique that just happens to be favored in that particular niche.

 

Simply because that aesthetic has some distinct design elements doesn't mean that they can be ascribed to solely the "original" designers and everyone else is just simulacra. We don't get all in a tizzy when innumerable companies make pleated pants or peak lapel blazers and write all but one off as copies.

 

The weightless stuff sounds interesting, though I'm curious as to why you didn't produce pants.

there isn't any specific reasoning as to why pants were not produced in the weightless series of garments. Its simply that as a small company we do make a lot of products, and every season we have to decide what is produced and what isn't.  right now this season we made a lot of items that were not carried in stores or listed on our web store site, simply because there is already too many items. Our Collections are usually big, even though not all of it is shown, so its a matter of editing it down and deciding what is produced and isn't.

post #139 of 391

Your comparisons are very interesting.
I respect the fact that you were at least honest enough to admit that in your research you saw more of my work that gave you a broader  perspective of what I do. As i said before, the siamese belt is nothing more that a fusion of two of out classic slim belt. If you were to cut the belt apart down the length of the belt, you would end up with two individual belts. 

 

Patchwork jeans have been around forever, so I don't think anyone can claim  ownership of, or accuse anyone of copying that that. Our Zero Jeans was created as a series of garments along with the Zero Jacket as a study in Zero waste. I have never seen the one you presented before though. I know Number Nine did one several seasons ago, but I don't know by which designer the one you are showing was made

 

Also never seen the jacket you presented before, nor do I know which designer its from. That pocket / dart configuration is a classic detail, used more so in women wear than mens, been around for ages.  I would like if you could take a look at the entire Jacket which that pocket is a part of, rather than just the pocket detail itself. 

The Jeans comparison is interesting. and i say this because they Jeans is a development on our classic Soft J pants that are made with three panels on the leg instead of the traditional two, and has been one of the oldest pants offerings from our studio, existing before the release of the CCP dead end jeans. It would have been impossible for any designer to copy something that was made AFTER the item that is accused of being a copy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post

It's a bit hard to suddenly provide examples since I obviously don't keep an extensive archive of your work + other similar works, but I've managed to assemble a few. Keep in mind that I never stated that any of your works are direct knock-offs, just that key concepts of your brand seemed heavily inspired from others and that I couldn't feel the uniqueness of Zam Barrett, I guess. I don't think you necessarily need to feel bad about this or care about my opinion ... just, it is what it is.

(Zam first, other brand second)













(Plus, the aforementioned Devoa coat, and other things which are very common amongst many brands in your niche like heavily curved tapered pants)

However, I'll confess that while looking for examples to fit my thesis, I also found a lot of interesting pieces by you which I couldn't think of any analog to, and that I would be interested in seeing/trying. I guess it's just that for me, the "vision" your brand represents never stood out to me, and I overwhelmingly remembered the negative things I had felt as people are often wont to do. So if your goal here was to put naysayers in their place, well, mission accomplished I guess – I do feel kind of foolish.

However, when you say, and I quote: "I borrow nothing from no one."

That is a heavy burden to put onto yourself, and one that I don't think is necessary.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by futuresailors View Post

Zam, you have the civility of a saint.

 

Equating Zam's use of overlock stitching to ripping off CCP would be like saying (to StyleForum-ize it) "Petar Petrov uses straight stitching, he's ripping off Ervell!"

It's a construction technique that just happens to be favored in that particular niche.

 

Simply because that aesthetic has some distinct design elements doesn't mean that they can be ascribed to solely the "original" designers and everyone else is just simulacra. We don't get all in a tizzy when innumerable companies make pleated pants or peak lapel blazers and write all but one off as copies.

 

The weightless stuff sounds interesting, though I'm curious as to why you didn't produce pants.

there isn't any specific reasoning as to why pants were not produced in the weightless series of garments. Its simply that as a small company we do make a lot of products, and every season we have to decide what is produced and what isn't.  right now this season we made a lot of items that were not carried in stores or listed on our web store site, simply because there is already too many items. Our Collections are usually big, even though not all of it is shown, so its a matter of editing it down and deciding what is produced and isn't.

post #140 of 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post


It's not slanderous to say something is derivative. Do you think an MC-er would be offended if you told him his suit looked like a Huntsman? If everyone could do that then noone would make the trip to Savile Row/Naples etc. It's a skill to be able to see what looks good in other designs and adopt them.

Brad et al are not "bitching" or moaning here so I don't really understand the commotion. I don't think anyone needs to justify taking inspiration from anyone esle. Just don't expect us all to sit round and commentate that it's revolutionary design or anything like that.

 

 

I agree with you to an extent,

except what is happening here isn't so much saying something is derivative, but that my entire offering of work as a designer is based simply on an approach of taking elements from others and appropriating it and calling it my own......
Every designer draws inspiration from some source, and no one starts with a blank canvas in designing. For me as i said before, I have no interest in being a revolutionary, and I think a part of the problem is that many of us have established a standard for ourselves by which we judge designers, with Aesthetic coherence and Vision being the chief judging factor. Whenever someone like comes along that does not fit the traditional expectations that we have  established then it becomes difficult for us to change our understanding or expectations.

 

 

My business is built on a different set of principles than most, in part because i have a different skill set than most modern designers, and in part because I realized if I  was gonna build a business, in order to be successful I would have to take a different route than the traditional ones taken.

post #141 of 391
I would have posted the full jacket in question if I could find a pic of it, I'm actually interested in seeing it since I really like this detail. The designer is Kazuyuki Kumagai.
post #142 of 391
hendrix,

the mc comparison is misleading, it's really a category error in that mc clothing is almost solely judged on construction, materials, and fit and streat wear is judged on design (with the understanding the construction is of second concern). In MC, the discrepancies in design are extremely subtle and when someone offers a comparison between tailoring houses (i.e. not design houses), the comparison reflects those characteristics, not design similarities.

It's kind of like the difference between "this engine is made like a ferrari's" and "this car looks like a ferrari." If true, the second has a negative connotation, the first a positive.
post #143 of 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic1 View Post

hendrix,

the mc comparison is misleading, it's really a category error in that mc clothing is almost solely judged on construction, materials, and fit and streat wear is judged on design (with the understanding the construction is of second concern). In MC, the discrepancies in design are extremely subtle and when someone offers a comparison between tailoring houses (i.e. not design houses), the comparison reflects those characteristics, not design similarities.

It's kind of like the difference between "this engine is made like a ferrari's" and "this car looks like a ferrari." If true, the second has a negative connotation, the first a positive.

The more I wear clothes the harder it is for me to find a difference between "design" and "subtle discrepancies". I take your point and I'm not going to claim that you can't draw a line between them, because you can if you want to and classic clothing enthusiasts certainly do, but I'm not sure in the end what that achieves.

Miles off topic and all, but I want to use Great Styleforum Nerd Mafoofan to illustrate my point.

Here is CM suit number 1 (ignore highlighted area, it was the only pic I could find).


and here is CM suit number 2


They look completely different to me. Sure the actual discrepancies are subtle but if the outcome is so different, why is that not considered "design" but instead house characteristics?

Not really meant to be a point as such, just musings really.
post #144 of 391

Photo is loading

 

here you go............. have others of it but I think this one shows the details of it best

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post

I would have posted the full jacket in question if I could find a pic of it, I'm actually interested in seeing it since I really like this detail. The designer is Kazuyuki Kumagai.
post #145 of 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zamb View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
IMG]https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/s320x320/417798_602348769784302_73918551_n.jpg[/IMG]

here you go............. have others of it but I think this one shows the details of it best

if we are comparing the above jacket to the below, you guys are on crack!

*
post #146 of 391
No, we're not. What?
post #147 of 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post

No, we're not. What?

lol8[1].gif
post #148 of 391
zfactorie is having a 30% off sale everything right now...looks like they've got a pretty full stock too. Recently bought the double front raglan top in off white. Very happy with it. good fit, drape, color, and soooofft.

http://shop.zambarrett.com/
post #149 of 391
Recently I was fortunate enough to win a contest held by Zam Barrett icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif.
WINNING! (Click to show)
*

The prize was one of his new one-shoulder sling bags, and it's really beautiful so I thought I'd share. Color is blackish with lots of undertones of green, brown, etc. Thick, soft, substantial leather. It's lined in heavy cotton and has an exterior pocket and one inside. Antiqued hardware, RiRi zippers, etc. Enjoy:


PIC OVERLOAD (Click to show)













Big thanks to Zam!
post #150 of 391
wow, really hope that comes out for sale soon! looks great biggrin.gif
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