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The perfect penny loafers - Page 3

post #31 of 52
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post


It's ~$35 to resole a pair of Quoddies and get the uppers refinished and new insole. Pay $150-$250 for a CXL shoe that can last you forever essentially? Much better deal

 

I guess I'm thinking more along the lines of driver mocs with the rubber studded sole that you cant get resoled.

post #32 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Imagine a plain toe blucher or derby. One smooth expanse of leather wrapping the toe and forefoot, going into the sole.

Now, imagine the shoemaker. He takes needle and thread and begins to work stitches in the skin, the resulting pattern forming a "lake" on the foot bounded by the U of the stitched pattern.
That is how a C&J or Alden penny is done. One piece of leather with a decorative skin stitch. (The upper is stitched up before the sole is attached, so don't take the visualization above literally.)

Now think of a moccasin. In its most simple form, it is three pieces of leather: the sole, the U shaped lake, and a strip of leather wrapped around the perimeter of the foot and joined either at the toe or at the heel. The is a "Norwegian" or WeeJun. They still make this shoe in Norway, and it inspired the refined, royal Wildsmith as well as the the egalitarian, American WeeJun.
So: the "perfect" penny is, to me, a WeeJun variant with the lake a separate piece of leather. The perimeter stitching loosens with wear and you end the shoe's life with a length of duct tape.
The more urbane Wildsmith version is also great...just not perfect.

+1 Beautifully constructed description.

Add to this, unlined, if I may?
post #33 of 52
Thread Starter 

When talking about a more casual penny loafer (one you can wear with chinos or jeans) what material would you all suggest?  I currently have a grain calf leather but I was thinking about getting a cordovan pair as well.  What are the pros and cons of getting a casual loafer in cordovan?

post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by TauKappaEpsilon View Post

When talking about a more casual penny loafer (one you can wear with chinos or jeans) what material would you all suggest?  I currently have a grain calf leather but I was thinking about getting a cordovan pair as well.  What are the pros and cons of getting a casual loafer in cordovan?

My shell loafers have aged exceptionally well, and have held up through much abuse. They look better now than they did when new well over a decade ago.
post #35 of 52
I really like my Carmina penny loafers. True moccasin construction, but fully lined.
post #36 of 52
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post


My shell loafers have aged exceptionally well, and have held up through much abuse. They look better now than they did when new well over a decade ago.

 

Can you post a picture?

post #37 of 52
Thread Starter 

bump

post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post

The perfect penny loafer for me is Alden's Handsewn in #8 shell cordovan. I've had mine for over a decade, and they look and feel better than ever.

quoted for truth
post #39 of 52
so much porn in here
post #40 of 52

I have tried to buy pennies several times.  I have literally gone out - cash in hand - ready to go, but err time I get them on my feet I balk. Jeans, khakis, slacks, zubaz... no matter, I never dig them.

 

 

Any suggestions? I really want to like them, but just can't see myself wearing them.  Maybe it's where I live... I guess I just can't see a time where teh penny would be more appropriate or better looking that boat shoes. 

post #41 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Everett464 View Post

I have tried to buy pennies several times.  I have literally gone out - cash in hand - ready to go, but err time I get them on my feet I balk. Jeans, khakis, slacks, zubaz... no matter, I never dig them.

 

 

Any suggestions? I really want to like them, but just can't see myself wearing them.  Maybe it's where I live... I guess I just can't see a time where teh penny would be more appropriate or better looking that boat shoes. 


Anytime you would wear a boat shoe (when you arent on a boat) can, and should, be replaced with a casual penny loafer. I would suggest getting a pair of AE Kenwoods and wearing them instead of your boat shoes for a few days and see what you think.
post #42 of 52
Thread Starter 

Can anyone explain what is meant when someone refers to the "lining" of a penny loafer?  I've noticed that typically the more casual penny loafers are unlined whereas the more business forward loafers are lined.  What does this mean?

post #43 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TauKappaEpsilon View Post

Can anyone explain what is meant when someone refers to the "lining" of a penny loafer?  I've noticed that typically the more casual penny loafers are unlined whereas the more business forward loafers are lined.  What does this mean?


??
post #44 of 52

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TauKappaEpsilon View Post

Can anyone explain what is meant when someone refers to the "lining" of a penny loafer?  I've noticed that typically the more casual penny loafers are unlined whereas the more business forward loafers are lined.  What does this mean?

 

Lining as your suit lining or pants lining, except its leather instead of bemberg.  Shoes w/o lining has a little bit less shape/sturdiness.

post #45 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post



Lining as your suit lining or pants lining, except its leather instead of bemberg.  Shoes w/o lining has a little bit less shape/sturdiness.

mebe. they wear a little lighter. ideal for the sockless way of life.
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