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Dress Code for Catholic Mass - Page 2

post #16 of 43
Dressing up is regrettably a fact of some groups of all flavours of religion. There is no logical reason why the quality of the devotions are improved by the formality of the attire and so far as I understand the nature of the deities being worshipped, none require it. It seems to me that it is entirely a man made and irrelevant custom, why do some monks (and others) think wearing a hair shirt is of benefit, why is flagellation practised by others?

None are relevant but those who look down upon attendees wearing shorts etc have in my view lost sight of the purpose of their attendance in the first place - to give their thanks to a purported deity not to show off the fact that they can buy clothes which they perceive to be good or conform to some self made minimum standard and that to do otherwise is unacceptable.
Edited by GBR - 4/23/12 at 12:13pm
post #17 of 43
I agree with others that is more important to go then how to dress, however in Catholic churches women with uncovered shoulders are still not allowed for example so some sort of dress code is expected as to respect the place and occasions.

Having said that, in Italy it was custom that you put on your "best" cloth on Sunday for mass. I grow up like that and I do my best every time I attend (Easter I wore a 'mezzo tight ' or stroller).

At the Italian church in London (clerckenwell), the old men's all wear ties and either a suits or sport jackets. However the younger one are mainly in jeans and shirts, some in trainers but some also make an effort.
post #18 of 43
I usually wear a sport coat or navy blazer and sometimes a tie. There are very few men in either suits or coat and tie at the two Catholic churches I attend regularly.
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

Maybe in the Six Counties, but I doubt this holds true anywhere else.
I rarely go to mass, but when I do, it's a suit and tie for the major holdays (and first communions, confirmations, etc.), sport jacket and slacks otherwise. While many are dressed more casually, quite a few of the other church-goers seem to be dressed similarly to me.

*Ulster
post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

Dressing up is regrettably a fact of some groups of all flavours of religion. There is no logical reason why the quality of the devotions are improved by the formality of the attire and so far as I understand the nature of the deities being worshipped, none require it. It seems to me that it is entirely a man made and irrelevant custom, why do some monks (and others) think wearing a hair shirt is of benefit, why is flagellation practised by others?
I think you are being iconoclastic for the sake of it, though there is some sense in what you say.
Quote:
...attendees wearing shorts...
The correct word, if there is one, is "attender". The suffix "-ee" is a passive one, the suffix "-er" the active one. Compare employer-employee. As "attend" is an intransitive verb, it cannot have a passive.
post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamson View Post

I think you are being iconoclastic for the sake of it, though there is some sense in what you say.
The correct word, if there is one, is "attender". The suffix "-ee" is a passive one, the suffix "-er" the active one. Compare employer-employee. As "attend" is an intransitive verb, it cannot have a passive.

Attendee is a noun.
post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by sns23 View Post

Attendee is a noun.

Indeed it is; but the correct noun is "attender".
Perhaps my last sentence was misleading; but compare employer/employee and you should see what I mean.
post #23 of 43
Tangentially related, my RCAF father made us shine our shoes for mass when I was a kid. To this day I cannot stand doing that.
post #24 of 43
It's appalling that in California, hoodies, shorts and flip flops are par for the course ranging from kids to men.
post #25 of 43
Some members of this forum would probably consider Jesus to be underdressed if he showed up at their church.

He was apparently known for wearing sandals and robes.
post #26 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford View Post

Some members of this forum would probably consider Jesus to be underdressed if he showed up at their church.
He was apparently known for wearing sandals and robes.

Oscar Wilde lives.
post #27 of 43
Suit and tie for pretty much every mass. My church is pretty divded about 40/60 formal/casual (i.e. suits and ties/ jeans or khakis & untucked shirts) for the men. Quite a few women wear a veil, and some even wear dressy hats. I would say we are a semi conservatively dressed church. The people who do dress formally usually do so consistently.. Every one else is in varying formality/casuality.
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamson View Post

Indeed it is; but the correct noun is "attender".
Perhaps my last sentence was misleading; but compare employer/employee and you should see what I mean.

No; "attendee" was used correctly and is more correct in the sense of being more likely to be understood, since it's more common than "attender." The English-speaking world is a strange place.

For my part, I spent my childhood Sundays at a very Low Church, but since moving to America I've been wearing a suit and tie to fit in with the hoity-toity Episcopalians.
post #29 of 43

Congrats on your nephew's First Communion.  I just attended my nephew's First Communion.  My brother wore a suit.  I wore a navy sport coat, dress shirt, and slacks (no tie).  The other dads wore suits as well.  The rest wore everything from a tshirt, cargo shorts, and sandals up to a sport shirt and jeans. 

post #30 of 43
Thread Starter 

Leaving grammar aside (hope I phrased that correctly), any thoughts on the damage kneeling in a pew for 15 minutes at a time could do to my pants? I realize this is ridiculous, but I do like to wear my nice stuff on special occasions but if it will destroy the garment I will sub for something more sturdy.

 

Regarding the argument of whether it is necessary to "dress up" for church, obviously it is not. However, I think you can express a level of respect for the ceremony through how you choose to present yourself.

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