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Why do loafers lose so much value on the secondary market?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I've noticed that loafers seem to be priced similarly to oxfords and bluchers in retail, but in the secondary market often have only a fraction of the value of oxfords and bluchers which were close in price in retail. Why is this?

post #2 of 13

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by heidegger View Post

I've noticed that loafers seem to be priced similarly to oxfords and bluchers in retail, but in the secondary market often have only a fraction of the value of oxfords and bluchers which were close in price in retail. Why is this?

 

Used clothes are worth like nothing which is why people just throw them in the Goodwill bin and then they sell them to the poor for a dollar. Same with used shoes. The sort of people who buy used shoes likely buy lace up shoes since the slipons are for the wealthier more sophisticated types who would never buy a used shoe. It's simply supply and demand.

post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidegger View Post

I've noticed that loafers seem to be priced similarly to oxfords and bluchers in retail, but in the secondary market often have only a fraction of the value of oxfords and bluchers which were close in price in retail. Why is this?

I have a feeling that there are two issues; 1) the market for loafers is smaller than the market for oxfords and bluchers, and 2) loafers are harder to fit properly and more risky to purchase without trying on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snedley View Post



Used clothes are worth like nothing which is why people just throw them in the Goodwill bin and then they sell them to the poor for a dollar. Same with used shoes. The sort of people who buy used shoes likely buy lace up shoes since the slipons are for the wealthier more sophisticated types who would never buy a used shoe. It's simply supply and demand.

Interesting. None of your points are correct.
post #4 of 13
I think supply and demand is correct. I would argue the loafer is more seasonal and wouldn't be the first or second shoe a man would gravitate to. I think many loafers also have rubber soles which do not hold their value well.

Snedley, If what you say is true then there would be an overabundance of nice loafers in the thrift shop.
post #5 of 13
Loafers arnt easily re-soled, they wear fast, and get dirty easier.

I love tods loafers, but their knob rubber bottoms are good for 6 months of semi regular wear in a rotation before they wear down. I have no interest in trying to buy or sell them second hand. Wouldn't buy them as they stretch to the wearers foot, so likely it wouldnt fit me. And selling them, why do I want someone on ebay complaining about the fit, and condition when I knowing am selling something that the wear pattern is worn thru, and only the upper appearance is maybe sort of passable.

I'd however buy and sell any of my C+J's in a heart beat.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tacobender View Post

Loafers arnt easily re-soled, they wear fast, and get dirty easier.

no
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

no

+1
post #8 of 13
Quoddys sell for the same amount used
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidegger View Post

I've noticed that loafers seem to be priced similarly to oxfords and bluchers in retail, but in the secondary market often have only a fraction of the value of oxfords and bluchers which were close in price in retail. Why is this?

2 reasons I can see for this are:
1) Most men will wear sandals, sneakers or other footwear than consider a loafer because most men think a loafer is 'too dressy' for casual wear. They are most likely un-informed or unaware of how to wear a loafer in the first place.

2) Loafers are often worn sockless. Personally on the grounds of personal hygiene I am against this practise. Without a sock to act as a buffer between leather insole and foot, the moisture from the foot makes direct contact with the leather insoles. This, in turn darkens amd discolours the leather insole and may even cause cracking in the insole leather footbed. A darkened and crusty insole won't sell. Only the naked eye can determine the true extent of discolouration. I can see why they are a hard sell online.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snedley View Post



Used clothes are worth like nothing which is why people just throw them in the Goodwill bin and then they sell them to the poor for a dollar. Same with used shoes. The sort of people who buy used shoes likely buy lace up shoes since the slipons are for the wealthier more sophisticated types who would never buy a used shoe. It's simply supply and demand.

lol8[1].giflol8[1].giflol8[1].gif
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snedley View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by heidegger View Post

I've noticed that loafers seem to be priced similarly to oxfords and bluchers in retail, but in the secondary market often have only a fraction of the value of oxfords and bluchers which were close in price in retail. Why is this?

 

Used clothes are worth like nothing which is why people just throw them in the Goodwill bin and then they sell them to the poor for a dollar. Same with used shoes. The sort of people who buy used shoes likely buy lace up shoes since the slipons are for the wealthier more sophisticated types who would never buy a used shoe. It's simply supply and demand.


Now I'm just thinking this guy has to be a troll...
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

the market for loafers is smaller than the market for oxfords and bluchers,

A poll I conducted late last year lends support to this ^ claim.
post #13 of 13

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post


2) Loafers are often worn sockless. Personally on the grounds of personal hygiene I am against this practise. Without a sock to act as a buffer between leather insole and foot, the moisture from the foot makes direct contact with the leather insoles. This, in turn darkens amd discolours the leather insole and may even cause cracking in the insole leather footbed. A darkened and crusty insole won't sell. Only the naked eye can determine the true extent of discolouration. I can see why they are a hard sell online.

 

this is the main reason why I'd never buy used loafers.

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