or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Securing Cracked Pottery
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Securing Cracked Pottery

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I recently acquired a hand-painted, Arts and Crafts mug that I've recently written about. It may be from as early as ca. 1910 and I want to use it regularly for coffee, without putting it in the dishwasher. However, I've noticed a hairline crack has appeared on the inside. I'd like to use a tiny bit of glue on the inside, to give me a little feeling of security it might sort of stabilize the crack and stop it from growing. Any ideas as to what to use? I do want to keep using the mug for hot beverages. Thanks.

263[/URL
post #2 of 17
You need a food grade epoxy or silicon adhesive.

http://physicsworld.com/cws/product/P000020545-food-grade-epoxy-resists-high-temperatures-tested-and-certified-to-meet-fda-cfr
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Were I to go to, say, a Home Depot, do you know how this information translates to a product I might ask for? I might go to a smaller hardware store, too, but am not sure what to ask for. I'm often not too satisfied with the knowledge portrayed by the staff at these places.... Thanks.
post #4 of 17
What about using an insert in the hand painted Arts and Craft mug that you have recently acquired and recently written about to prevent any further damage such as the hairline crack which your mug has already obtained sometime in the past. You can probably get a small ceramic cup that will fit inside the mug and if you cut an O-ring out of cork or use a ready-made one of rubber, you can create a nice tight fit and good seal between the insert and the Arts and Crafts mug. This will have the added advantage of insulating the Arts and Crafts mug so the outside surface remains cool, even when you are using a hot beverage and the beverage stays hot even while the outside surface of the Arts and Crafts mug is cool.
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lafont View Post

Were I to go to, say, a Home Depot, do you know how this information translates to a product I might ask for? I might go to a smaller hardware store, too, but am not sure what to ask for. I'm often not too satisfied with the knowledge portrayed by the staff at these places.... Thanks.

I doubt Home Depot would carry something like this, it's kind of a specialty product. Look for a restaurant supply store or buy online.

http://www.alfaadhesives.com/v2/productlist.php?series=al400fd&gclid=CLKDi_a_oK8CFecSNAodxGPNaQ

http://www.masterbond.com/
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Dopey - Thanks but I wouldn't want to go that route. Too complex. The mug keeps the liquid hot long enough. Anything that would change the appearance of the mug like that would spoil the experience for me. I just want an invisible glue or epoxy or whatever. I just don't want to think of its contaminating what I'm drinking.
post #7 of 17
It sounds like the glazing is cracked and it's no big deal. It's caused from expansion and contraction and is a sign of thermal shock which makes sense for a coffee mug.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
I don't know if you can say it's just the glazing, but there's a thin crack that starts on the top and makes its way down to around the bottom of the handle. As long as you said this I just looked on the outside and see it's there, too. Can't say if it's been on the outside or not; the coloring is such that's it's not very evident if one isn't looking for it. That means I'd put the material inside and out.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'm finding a variety of tips on the web, ranging from "throw it away" to discussing germs, to the following type of "how to":

http://www.wikihow.com/Mend-a-Crack-in-Pottery

Some say an epoxy is good, or perhaps a superglue labled "non-toxic."
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lafont View Post

I'm finding a variety of tips on the web, ranging from "throw it away" to discussing germs, to the following type of "how to":
http://www.wikihow.com/Mend-a-Crack-in-Pottery
Some say an epoxy is good, or perhaps a superglue labled "non-toxic."

You won't find any super glue labeled as non toxic. Welcome to the world of legal CYA. The fact is that according to the MSDS ingesting it is more or less a non issue as far as poisoning is concerned. It's fairly common knowledge that the stuff was used by the military to close wounds among other things. Since it appears you have a crack I would run a small bead along the inside and outside and let it dry overnight. You can get rid of the excess with a razor blade if you wish.
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
I kept it simple and used the ol' Elmer's Glue. Says can be used for ceramics, etc. and "non-toxic." Used fingers, paper towel (I think), tried to wipe off excess. Let it dry over 24 hrs. and still haven't used it. If it gets such the crack keeps growing or the liquid seeps through that will probably be that but I'm happy with it and mug has same vintage appearance I selected it for.

Thanks for the ideas, most of which were more elaborate.
post #12 of 17
Elmer's glue is water-soluble, so it is not the most optimal solution for repairing a crack in your Arts and Crafts mug if your intention is to drink a hot beverage from said Arts and Crafts Mug since the glue will dissolve when it comes in contact with the liquid from your beverage which will have the effect of undoing the repair to the crack in your vintage Arts and Crafts mug.
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Okay. That's too bad, so thanks!
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Okay - I went around to a number of businesses - home store big-box chain, small hardware, crafts big box, kitchenware, kitchen supplied (just a phone call or two), etc. My criteria was: 1) non-toxic, can be used with food; 2) not water soluble; 3) can be used repeatedly with hot liquid. Also I didn't want to pay a lot and I didn't want the product to be visible. Saturday I went to a very good independent hardward store which had a product that appears to meet all my criteria: DAP All-Purpose Adhesive Sealant. it is said to form "a strong waterproof seal," is "safe for food contact," and is "dishwasher & microwave safe." It's invisible, easy to apply, and more expensive (about $6.95 but I hope to use ot for other applcations as well). Illustrations suggest use for an aquarium and a ceramic cup (though other products have shown cup illustrations as well; that doesn't necessarily mean the product can be used where the cup meets with liquid; the glue might just be for attaching a handle).

Here's hoping this adhesive meets my purposes and I'm able to use the mug for a long, long time!
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

You won't find any super glue labeled as non toxic. Welcome to the world of legal CYA. The fact is that according to the MSDS ingesting it is more or less a non issue as far as poisoning is concerned. It's fairly common knowledge that the stuff was used by the military to close wounds among other things. Since it appears you have a crack I would run a small bead along the inside and outside and let it dry overnight. You can get rid of the excess with a razor blade if you wish.

 

There is a difference between commercial cyanoacrylates which are short-chain, and medical CA's which are long-chain.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Elmer's glue is water-soluble, so it is not the most optimal solution for repairing a crack in your Arts and Crafts mug if your intention is to drink a hot beverage from said Arts and Crafts Mug since the glue will dissolve when it comes in contact with the liquid from your beverage which will have the effect of undoing the repair to the crack in your vintage Arts and Crafts mug.

 

Yah, facepalm.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lafont View Post

Okay - I went around to a number of businesses - home store big-box chain, small hardware, crafts big box, kitchenware, kitchen supplied (just a phone call or two), etc. My criteria was: 1) non-toxic, can be used with food; 2) not water soluble; 3) can be used repeatedly with hot liquid. Also I didn't want to pay a lot and I didn't want the product to be visible. Saturday I went to a very good independent hardward store which had a product that appears to meet all my criteria: DAP All-Purpose Adhesive Sealant. it is said to form "a strong waterproof seal," is "safe for food contact," and is "dishwasher & microwave safe." It's invisible, easy to apply, and more expensive (about $6.95 but I hope to use ot for other applcations as well). Illustrations suggest use for an aquarium and a ceramic cup (though other products have shown cup illustrations as well; that doesn't necessarily mean the product can be used where the cup meets with liquid; the glue might just be for attaching a handle).

Here's hoping this adhesive meets my purposes and I'm able to use the mug for a long, long time!

 

There is a number 1 rule of gluing stuff. And it is that your surfaces have to be very well prepped and not contaminated. At this point, I think you're toast, as liquid you drank (coffee) has wicked into the crack, now there's Elmer's in there. I probably would try and clean the crack surface very well, then let it sit full of water for a few days so that maybe it will wick in and dissolve stuff in the crack. Then I'd let it dry out for a few weeks before trying to glue it.

 

Good luck. I can't comment on if that is the right glue or not, but I will say that I remain dubious of it being a long-term solution.

 

~ H

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Securing Cracked Pottery