or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Passover 2012
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Passover 2012 - Page 3

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Oh, interesting. because it's for sacrifice? I just assumed we were raised with beef because it was the only thing my dad liked.

The whole focus of Passover was the sacrifice of the Paschal Lamb (which is very different than the other Temple sacrifices and unique among Jewish holidays). So the idea is to make clear that, absent the temple, the sacrifice is no longer being eaten. There are different customs about not having roasted anything, or any lamb, but the one universal is not to have roasted lamb. I think there is at least some Sephardic community or communities that have the custom to have lamb as a reminder of the Paschal Lamb, but to make it in an obviously non-roasted way so as to make sure there is no confusion. I think most Ashkenazic communities don't have any roasted meats at the seder (including poultry), so they would add liquid to the roasting pan if making that kind of dish.
Edited by dopey - 4/5/12 at 1:15pm
post #32 of 51
This is interesting. I am having braised lamb, which is, I suppose, OK. I will bring this topic up at dinner.
post #33 of 51
Thread Starter 
Some of the traditional Sephardic lamb dishes are actually served cold or at room temperature. Claudia Roden, as I recall, describes her family's seder as including a boiled dish with several sauces. There are also braised lamb dishes and lamb stuffings.

I have seen roasted birds at some orthodox seders.
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

This is interesting. I am having braised lamb, which is, I suppose, OK. I will bring this topic up at dinner.

Well done. That is precisely the function of the Seder. Most of the rituals are intended to foster discussion, hence the "Four Questions" and even the Seder Plate itself.

BTW, here is a Sephardic Rabbi on the topic: http://www.dailyhalacha.com/Display.asp?ClipDate=4/16/2008 (he explains why braising is OK) and a NYTimes article: http://www.nytimes.com/1988/03/23/garden/a-tender-lamb-dish-for-a-passover-seder.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe View Post

Some of the traditional Sephardic lamb dishes are actually served cold or at room temperature. Claudia Roden, as I recall, describes her family's seder as including a boiled dish with several sauces. There are also braised lamb dishes and lamb stuffings.
I have seen roasted birds at some orthodox seders.
In all likelihood they were roasted with added liquid, though there may be some communities that aren't concerned with roasting poultry.
post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

I think most Ashkenazic communities don't have any roasted meats at the seder (including poultry), so they would add liquid to the roasting pan if making that kind of dish.
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe View Post

I have seen roasted birds at some orthodox seders.

You guys are tearing me apart
post #36 of 51
GDL, I shared the scenario with a few Jewish friends this week that I was having braised pork belly for dinner Friday and another Jewish friend said to dust it with bitter herbs and that it would be okay. They thought the comment was hilarious.

Also, one lady I shared it with said that last year, without thinking what she was doing, prepared a pork roast for Rosh Hashanah.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

GDL, I shared the scenario with a few Jewish friends this week that I was having braised pork belly for dinner Friday and another Jewish friend said to dust it with bitter herbs and that it would be okay. They thought the comment was hilarious.
.

I would have laughed at that shog[1].gif
post #38 of 51
This is fascinating. Dopey (or anyone else) - why does roasting a bird dry disqualify it from being on the seder as opposed to roasting it with liquids (which is a braise I'm assuming?)? confused.gif
post #39 of 51
I've had roasted mutton for passover at a morocan household, and I usually make roasted lamb.


we aren't having a real seder this year, as we are on the road - the family is on vacation in Singapore and Thailand. acutally, it would have been really easy to have a seder, if I had planned a little better around it. I think I will get my hands on some indian flat bread and have a very simple seder. I do feel a little bad about this.
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

This is fascinating. Dopey (or anyone else) - why does roasting a bird dry disqualify it from being on the seder as opposed to roasting it with liquids (which is a braise I'm assuming?)? confused.gif
Because roasting is how the Paschal Lamb was prepared. It would not have been roasted with liquid, which makes it ok to prepare that way for the seder. I posted some links above that explain it more.
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post

I've had roasted mutton for passover at a morocan household, and I usually make roasted lamb.
we aren't having a real seder this year, as we are on the road - the family is on vacation in Singapore and Thailand. acutally, it would have been really easy to have a seder, if I had planned a little better around it. I think I will get my hands on some indian flat bread and have a very simple seder. I do feel a little bad about this.
If they were observant or traditional (and odds are, they were at least the latter), it is likely it was roasted in sauces or liquids. That is a pretty universal custom in Sephardic as well as Ashkenazi households.
Edited by dopey - 4/6/12 at 5:55am
post #41 of 51

We totally half-assed it and just ate chicken, potatoes and the ol' MB soup.

My uncle is Chabad-Lubavitch and he hasn't ever done lamb at the seder. 

post #42 of 51
Pressured by tradition to make brisket, but have expanded into more Sephardic recipes for veggies and sides.

Love the charoset recipe that started the thread. Not time to make for tonight but will definitely give it a try.
post #43 of 51
For reasons I really can't explain, singing this song has been the end of Seder tradition in our family.
Our lyrics vary slightly and some verses are different, as there are, apparently, many variations. From what I gather, it had its origins as a Negro folk tune. There are elements of divine retribution and class struggle, presumably related, which probably explain why it made it into our Seder. The black humor also makes it fun to sing when you are a bit tipsy. Does anyone else know it?
Edited by dopey - 4/6/12 at 10:16am
post #44 of 51
The Pete Seeger version:
post #45 of 51

One thing I like about Passover is getting some of the Kosher wine from California and Israel, which are 13-14%.

 

Nothing like sausages and matzo rolls for Passover. I'll stick with the whole no bread version of Passover, the rest of the rules go out the window.

 

What is funny, I was in Austin during SXSW and every grocery store had stuff out for Passover already. Plus they had a better kosher section than the grocery store, than the one near my house. I am stuck traveling into the city, which is a hassle.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Passover 2012