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Proper Hygiene when visiting your shirtmaker or tailor

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Please bathe within a reasonable amount of time prior to visiting your shirtmaker/tailor.
the night before is fine, unless you had three hours of sex or went to the gym in the morning and did not shower..

If you show up smelling ripe with your girlfriend in tow, she too should be admonished for
allowing you out of the apt/house smelling that bad.

do not wear your favorite shirt for a fitting if it is not clean

Do not bring shirts back to be fixed if they are not clean.

Do not think for a minute that cologne will cover up the
body order on a dirty shirt. Sometimes the cologne smells even worse.

When you are asked if these shirts being returned for alterations are clean,
do not say yes, when you wore the shirt three days earlier while wearing a t-shirt.
A clean shirt has been laundered after wearing.
it does not have to be beautifully pressed, just not brought back in a ball.

When we work on a shirt for repairs, we will repress the shirt. It is not a good idea to press a dirty shirt.

Would you want to handle someone else's smelly clothing?

If you bring pants back to the tailor for work, How many times have you worn those trousers since they were cleaned?

Think about having those dry cleaned before bringing them in.


Please share any other thoughts on this topic.
post #2 of 14

TMI.

 

It's a shame that your requests would ever be necessary.

 

I guess truth really is stranger than fiction. Just glad you didn't feel compelled to spell out a delousing protocol.

 

Cheers!

post #3 of 14
Sorry to hear that you have some customers with gross habits and dreadful manners, Carl.
post #4 of 14
You have a very low class of customer indeed if you need to make this plea: My sympathies,
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
These young men are not low class. They have advanced degrees and well paid jobs. Just no clue!
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

These young men are not low class. They have advanced degrees and well paid jobs. Just no clue!

They are well educated and well employed. They have no class. Different things.

I would be humiliated to give a dirty piece of clothing to my alterationist.
post #7 of 14
Carl is absolutely right. But it's not just an issue of healthy working conditions for the tailor, it's an issue of respect for the tailor as an individual.

My policy is simple: Our tailors will not work on any garment that has not been first dry cleaned or laundered. If a client or potential client believes that this request is unreasonable, we respectfully invite him or her to find another tailor.
post #8 of 14
My maker in his 40 plus years of dressing men has noticed a few pigeonhole-able types: risk taker, risk avoider, rejecter, and slob.

This thread is to improve the slobs.

- M
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poindexter View Post

They are well educated and well employed. They have no class. Different things.
I would be humiliated to give a dirty piece of clothing to my alterationist.

I think it's not about the class is about the education, because educations is not just about Maths, English and Science but being really respectful and conscious is part of that
post #10 of 14

What a pity to have to read a post like this!

 

post #11 of 14

Whew, I'm glad I brought my March alterations straight from the cleaners to CEGO smile.gif.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

These young men are not low class. They have advanced degrees and well paid jobs. Just no clue!

 

 

post #12 of 14
jeesh... goes to show money doesn't buy class, nor manners.
post #13 of 14

they probably thought it proper hygiene wouldn't matter so they bring in the clothes anyway.

post #14 of 14
I enjoyed this thread.
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