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StumpTown Kilts

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hello to Style Forum,

I have been browsing your site and keeping tabs on it for a while, and it seems to be lacking a kilt section. There are lots of great topics for men's fashion, but nothing on Kilts.

We are a new Kilt company base out of Portland Oregon, and feel kilts are and should be the next fashionable item for me. We have created a low maintenance, every day kilt and are very excited about it. StumpTownKilts.com, we are here for your, our kilt is your kilt, customize it, and have fun with it.

Cheers,
Cyd

StumpTownKilts.com

post #2 of 17
FYI, a kilt should not be worn on the hips, like a skirt, but rather up at one's natural waist line...like a kilt.

At least you have pleats in the back with is one up on the utili-skirt, so kudos on that.
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

FYI, a kilt should not be worn on the hips, like a skirt, but rather up at one's natural waist line...like a kilt.
At least you have pleats in the back with is one up on the utili-skirt, so kudos on that.

you're right on with the Utili-skirt but not on wearing the kilt.. there are two types, formal and casual.. formal kilts are higher... 2" above the navel and are meant to be worn with a waist coat and formal jacket..  they look stupid with just a shirt alone.. you look like an old man with his trouser up to his nipples.. casual kilts end at the navel and are not made specifically to wear with a waist coat and jacket.. but more along the lines of a shirt and sweater or casual jacket.. like a jean jacket, a hamilton, or bomber..

 

many people assume the difference between formal and casual kilts is the amount of cloth (8 yds vs 4 yds) but the main difference is the height..

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by afreegreek View Post

you're right on with the Utili-skirt but not on wearing the kilt.. there are two types, formal and casual.. formal kilts are higher... 2" above the navel and are meant to be worn with a waist coat and formal jacket..  they look stupid with just a shirt alone.. you look like an old man with his trouser up to his nipples.. casual kilts end at the navel and are not made specifically to wear with a waist coat and jacket.. but more along the lines of a shirt and sweater or casual jacket.. like a jean jacket, a hamilton, or bomber..

many people assume the difference between formal and casual kilts is the amount of cloth (8 yds vs 4 yds) but the main difference is the height..
Not the fact if its formal you look Scottish and if its casual you just look like a cross dresser?
post #5 of 17
I wear a (real) kilt with reasonable frequency, and thought I'd clarify things as I see them:

A traditional kilt is composed of 8-9 yards of material, and is worn above the navel.

A casual kilt is composed of around 5 yards of material, and so the pleats are shallower and wider. This is also worn above the navel.

The "semi-traditional" kilt can be made form pretty much anything--acrylic seems to be the material of choice--and is worn lower, at the waist. Often, anyway, since there's so much variation with these things it's impossible to generalize.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by afreegreek View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

FYI, a kilt should not be worn on the hips, like a skirt, but rather up at one's natural waist line...like a kilt.

At least you have pleats in the back with is one up on the utili-skirt, so kudos on that.
you're right on with the Utili-skirt but not on wearing the kilt.. there are two types, formal and casual.. formal kilts are higher... 2" above the navel and are meant to be worn with a waist coat and formal jacket..  they look stupid with just a shirt alone.. you look like an old man with his trouser up to his nipples.. casual kilts end at the navel and are not made specifically to wear with a waist coat and jacket.. but more along the lines of a shirt and sweater or casual jacket.. like a jean jacket, a hamilton, or bomber..

many people assume the difference between formal and casual kilts is the amount of cloth (8 yds vs 4 yds) but the main difference is the height..

Incorrect. A kilt is meant to be worn above the navel. Period. This fellow agrees with me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tweedydon View Post

I wear a (real) kilt with reasonable frequency, and thought I'd clarify things as I see them:

A traditional kilt is composed of 8-9 yards of material, and is worn above the navel.

A casual kilt is composed of around 5 yards of material, and so the pleats are shallower and wider. This is also worn above the navel.

I too wear a kilt, although not as often as when I was playing the pipes, and grew up in an area where kilts are worn on a fairly frequent basis by many men (and some women).
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


Incorrect. A kilt is meant to be worn above the navel. Period. This fellow agrees with me.
I too wear a kilt, although not as often as when I was playing the pipes, and grew up in an area where kilts are worn on a fairly frequent basis by many men (and some women).

this man may agree with you but the people who produce both the casual and formal kilts don't.. if you were to go to Scotsweb for example to order one it's right there in the fit section.. the front of a casual kilt ends at the navel, the formal kilt extend up 2 inches above the navel.. I have 6 kilts, one formal and 5 casual.. they are all made by different makers except 2.. I've given the same measurement each time 34, 39, 21-1/2.. 5 of the kilts came 21-1/2" long, one came 23-1/2" long.. the fell ( the stitched part of the pleats) of the 23-1/2" formal kilt is also 2 inches longer and flared out at the top

 

like they say... people are entitled to their own opinions but not their own facts..

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Humphrey Appleby View Post

Not the fact if its formal you look Scottish and if its casual you just look like a cross dresser?

 if you look like a cross dresser in a kilt you probably look like one in pants too.. anyway, people can think what they want... all I know is I've already filled my sporran with compliments before the idiot comes along with the 'nice skirt' comment..

post #9 of 17
I think you are confusing real or traditional kilts with all other things calling themselves kilts. There is no such thing as a "formal" kilt. The beauty of the kilt, which completely mirrors the Scottish mindset, is that one garment is fit for all uses and occasions. If you want to make a distinction between a traditional or real kilt vs. something that isn't I'll buy that. There are all kinds of things calling themselves "kilt" these days but it doesn't mean they really are.
post #10 of 17
Doesn't this thread belong in men's clothi - oh, wait, nevermind.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

Doesn't this thread belong in men's clothi - oh, wait, nevermind.

Fuck you China...er, Scotsman.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I think you are confusing real or traditional kilts with all other things calling themselves kilts. There is no such thing as a "formal" kilt. The beauty of the kilt, which completely mirrors the Scottish mindset, is that one garment is fit for all uses and occasions. If you want to make a distinction between a traditional or real kilt vs. something that isn't I'll buy that. There are all kinds of things calling themselves "kilt" these days but it doesn't mean they really are.

no. I'm talking about wool tartan knife pleated kilts.. my kilts are all made in Scotland.. Lochcarron, DC Dalgliesh, Strathmore and Manley Richardson.. you can't get more Scottish than that.. Scottish wool woven in Scottish mills, sewn by Scotthish employees of Scottish companies in Scotland.. but rather than arguing the point I'll just post a couple of links... go to the pages and click the 'images' tab to view the photos..

 

http://www.scotweb.co.uk/products/bespoke-casual-kilt-by-manley-richardson/

 

Manley Richardson is renowned as Scotland's most exquisite tailors of fully bespoke kilts and hightlandwear. Made with incomparable attention to detail, this Bespoke Casual Kilt is hand-sewn to the same exacting standards as all Manley Richardson kilts. But as the shallower pleats demand less fabric and a LOWER WAIST, this exclusive garment is ideal for daily wear and less formal occasions.

 

http://www.scotweb.co.uk/products/bespoke-eight-yard-kilt-by-manley-richardson/

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by afreegreek View Post

 if you look like a cross dresser in a kilt you probably look like one in pants too.. anyway, people can think what they want... all I know is I've already filled my sporran with compliments before the idiot comes along with the 'nice skirt' comment..
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

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post #14 of 17
I followed those links. Did not see a reference to "formal" kilts but you are correct they are calling something a "casual" kilt. I've never come across that in my life nor anywhere else. There is a traditional kilt, which I think you are referring to as "formal," and then there are a bunch of other things with less material or other materials that are not traditional kilts. Also, wtf are you doing with six kilts? Do you wear one daily? I mean, even when I was busy piping, I had my personal kilt and my band kilt and that was it. You must be collecting them for some reason.

Oh, and just FWIW, my personal and band kilt were both made in Scotland, etc, yada, yada, yada too. My pipes were bespoken and include custom silver engraving and dedication plaque to me on the bass drone. I can get fancy shit from Scotland too.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I followed those links. Did not see a reference to "formal" kilts but you are correct they are calling something a "casual" kilt. I've never come across that in my life nor anywhere else. There is a traditional kilt, which I think you are referring to as "formal," and then there are a bunch of other things with less material or other materials that are not traditional kilts. Also, wtf are you doing with six kilts? Do you wear one daily? I mean, even when I was busy piping, I had my personal kilt and my band kilt and that was it. You must be collecting them for some reason.
Oh, and just FWIW, my personal and band kilt were both made in Scotland, etc, yada, yada, yada too. My pipes were bespoken and include custom silver engraving and dedication plaque to me on the bass drone. I can get fancy shit from Scotland too.

I wouldn't say I'm a daily kilt wearer but from the spring to the fall I wear a kilt when a person would normally wear dressier pants.. a movie, dinner, pub, club, that sort of thing.. why? well if I had to dig down to the nub of it, it's because women love them and I get plenty of attention from the ladies when I'm wearing one.. attention that I don't get wearing other clothes.. they are basically chick magnets.. beside that I just like them.. why 6? 4 are the various versions of my family tartan (Johnstone), one is Canada's national tartan and one is black.. the various shades and colours of each tartan give me a range suitable to coordinate with anything I want to wear.. black is for when I want to wear patterns as most patterns clash with tartan.

 

as for the kilts themselves, they are traditional kilts.. fringed A-line aprons, knife pleated to the sett, 3 leather straps with metal buckles.. they are not 'fashion' kilts or utility kilts.. they are traditional in every way.. but only one is what is called a formal kilt.. it is meant to wear with formal attire.. they are higher waisted so a Price Charlie (or variant) and waist coat can be worn and not show any shirt when sitting or bending over.. the belt if you wear one will sit above the hip on your natural waist with a 1/2" or so of  tartan showing above.. the casual kilt is shorter and suits other less formal clothing.. it ends at the navel and the belt sits on the hip bones like when wearing a pair of pants.. this looks better almost all the time as you don't have that "old man" look with your kilt up under your armpits..

 

best way to think of it is the difference between slacks and a blazer vs a tuxedo.. both are traditional men's wear but the blazer is not considered formal attire..

 

 

from the Scotsweb site..

 

The casual kilt is often thought of as a cut-down and reduced price version of the real thing. But it is more than that. This garment almost always uses a shorter length of fabric than a full traditional eight yard kilt. But you could in fact have an 8-yard length made to a casual cut. There is another important distinction. A casual kilt will usually be cut to the same waistline as trousers. This sets it apart from the traditional kilt, which rises a few inches above the hips, adding to the inherent impressiveness of that garment. Conversely the lower cut makes this one more, well, casual. Being less imposing can be a positive, lending it a greater air of informality, for contexts where this is desirable. The look arguably lends itself better to fashion wear, where the traditional high-waisted look may feel less appropriate.

It is probably not the first choice for formal occasions. But a casual kilt will be fine for many situations, and may indeed be the best idea for a number of uses.

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