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Henry Carter Neckwear & Accessories: Official affiliate thread - Page 96

post #1426 of 1518
Thread Starter 
Macclesfield hand-rolled pocket squares now on sale. No inkjet prints here!

http://www.henrycarter.com.au/shop/pocket-squares/

post #1427 of 1518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Carter View Post

Selected wool challis now on sale

http://www.henrycarter.com.au/sale/

 

 

If anyone's on the fence about the challis ties or the Sozzi x HC knits, they shouldn't be. I've got the above tie and it's fantastic, with a beautiful knot and the sale price is a great, great deal. The zig-zag knits are also great. 

post #1428 of 1518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


If anyone's on the fence about the challis ties or the Sozzi x HC knits, they shouldn't be. I've got the above tie and it's fantastic, with a beautiful knot and the sale price is a great, great deal. The zig-zag knits are also great. 

Ok, JM, your eloquent argument has won me over and I have ordered both a challis and a zigzag knit tie accordingly smile.gif
post #1429 of 1518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post


Ok, JM, your eloquent argument has won me over and I have ordered both a challis and a zigzag knit tie accordingly smile.gif

 

Great to hear - you won't be disappointed!

 

What colours/patterns did you get?

post #1430 of 1518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

Great to hear - you won't be disappointed!

What colours/patterns did you get?

I got the burnt orange knit and the brown/red challis.
post #1431 of 1518

HC you think the burnt orange zig zag is much different from the orange knit I purchased off you a while back, looks like its a darker orange perhaps or would they be pretty close

post #1432 of 1518
Thread Starter 
Yeah the colour is quite a bit different, the older knit (non zigzag) is a much brighter orange than this. I'll post some side by side pics tonight.
post #1433 of 1518
That's what I expected. I'm glad the burnt orange tie won't be duplicating the orange knit I already have.
post #1434 of 1518
Thread Starter 
Guys I hope these help you out, Both were taken over a year apart, in different lights, different camera settings etc but you get the idea anyway

Old


New ZigZag

post #1435 of 1518
Thread Starter 
Olive + Navy





Suit: Herringbone Sydney
Shirt: Luxire summer chambray
Tie: Henry Carter Macclesfield
PS: Henry Carter Macclesfield
Shoes: Carmina
post #1436 of 1518
Thread Starter 
The perfect slip stitch - runs from the bar tack to bar tack on each end of the tie and allows your tie to be flexible. Lets it stretch when it needs to (tying & un-tying) and lets it get back to it former shape after all of that stress. Many cheaper ties will either me macine stitched or have very tight slip stitches which doesn't allow a tie to stretch.

post #1437 of 1518

For anyone who is wondering how the burnt orange knit compares to the older orange knit tie, this is for you:

 

 

I've put up a few more pictures at http://gezzasmenswear.tumblr.com/post/94896999922/ties-from-henry-carter-i-just-received-two-ties

post #1438 of 1518
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the write up and pictorial Gerry, good to see them both side by side under the same light and conditions as a comparison.
post #1439 of 1518
My pleasure, Jas. It's tough to get the on-screen child exactly the same as in real life but the comparison should prove useful if you can see them relative to each other.
post #1440 of 1518
Thread Starter 
Tipping - What the hell is it?

The tipping of a tie refer's to the back piece of fabric at the bottom of both ends of the tie that covers the rear of the blades fabric. Today we are going to explore the different types of tipping and why they are used and the advantages and disadvantages of the different tipping styles. The 3 most common ones we'll discuss are self-tipped, un-tipped and silk/satin tipped.

Self tipped

Self tipped ties refer to the tipping being made in the same material as the tie is made in. Usually found in more expensive ties due to having to use the fabric of the tie rather than cheaper silk/satin tipping. There's no real disadvantages to self--tipping apart from making very heavy silks and wools too thick, but we'll cover that a bit further down. The biggest advantage of a self tipped tie is it's the strongest construction and will no doubt last longer than other types of tipping.



Un-tipped

Un-tipped ties are currently very in fashion with the #menswear market with lot's of companies now making them. They are a clothing enthusiasts tie as in my experience the average joe thinks they are inferior due to the lighter weight compared to other tipping methods.

So yeah, they look cool with the hand-rolled edges and all but that doesn't mean all ties should be un-tipped. Grenadines are not ideal to be un-tipped because the open weave causes the fabric to be susceptible to stretching and an un-tipped tie is more fragile already so the 2 don't make a good combination unless you like replacing ties after a year. Un-tipped ties in my opinion are best on plain fabrics like twills, linen/blends and printed silks and wools, that have clean backings. Used on woven jacquard fabrics they can look very messy as the back of the front blade is exposed. Hand-rolling should be uniform, tight and even, not wonky and loose.



Silk/Satin tipped

This type of tipping is mostly found on cheaper ties because it's the cheapest way to tip a tie, but there are exceptions as to why it can be used on higher end ties also. The most common one, and the only time we've ever used it is for heavy wools and cashmere's that would simply make the tie too heavy and thick if self tipped and aren't suitable for being un-tipped.



So there you have it, it might sound like a small part of what makes up a tie but you can now see what differences the different tipping methods make when considering buying your next tie. Next week we'll cover interlining and I'll be dissecting a couple of ties to explain how they affect the knot, weight and drape of a tie.
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