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What was the inspiration for 80's type suits? - Page 5

post #61 of 88
The objective of fashion houses is t get you to buy more. So, 1980's style had to be different from that of the year before so that you felt unfashionable and compelled to buy.
post #62 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

I actually saw RL several times "in person" in the 70s and the 90s.
He needs wide shoulders.


I'm curious as to the need for the quotation marks? It sounds as if it was his mind transplanted into a robot body or something... :)

 

On topic, I think there's a fairly clear visual lineage from Armani back to the exaggerated Hollywood look of the 30s and into the 40s, as most others have already mentioned. Of course, his usage of much softer/finer fabrics made it look different in practice, esp. on some builds.

post #63 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

The objective of fashion houses is t get you to buy more. So, 1980's style had to be different from that of the year before so that you felt unfashionable and compelled to buy.

Obey...consume...conform...submit.
post #64 of 88
The Chinese became victims of that, apparantly.
post #65 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

The objective of fashion houses is t get you to buy more. So, 1980's style had to be different from that of the year before so that you felt unfashionable and compelled to buy.

This is backwards and wrong. Think about it.

The overwhelming majority of men easily resist such marketing. They did in the 70s and 80s and they do now today. A big majority of all suits are sold to men who cautiously buy them with the intention of wearing them as long as possible. Trendy is the last thing they want to buy.

Fashion houses may feel pressure to produce something new. Designers need to distinguish themselves from one another. But the large retailers of suits feel the opposite pressure. If you opened a suit store and radically changed the style of your stock every year, you'd go out of business. The number of men who feel "compelled to buy" because last year's suit is out of fashion ... is very very small. Not many can make a living selling them suits.

The mass of suit buyers do not exert pressure for new styles of suits on Brooks Brothers and Men's Wearhouse and Ralph Lauren (who must about 100 "Lauren" suits for every 1 "Purple Label"). The mass of suit buyers demand the same old same old.

If anything, it is remarkable that suit styles change at all. The sudden popularity of the Armani cut is not so easily explained. 1972-1982 was very tumultuous decade in menswear. Much more so than 2002-2012.
post #66 of 88
Thread Starter 
To add a bit of confusion to the mix, I read that most mens 'luxury' menswear (Boss, Armani, etc...) are actually bought by women. Some marketing firms did a big study and found that 70-80% of luxury menswear is bought by girlfriends/wives. Thus, Boss and Armani marketing campaigns are being increasingly steered towards women, even though they're advertising menswear.

But as a note of caution, I don't think this principle applies to Sartoria Partenopea, Brioni, Kiton, etc... Only to the mass-market fashion houses.
Edited by othertravel - 3/28/12 at 3:50pm
post #67 of 88
This is a great thread. And Dewey, I agree, it is amazing there is any market at all for newly fashionable suits. I think about the people I work with and I can think of only a handful that actually care about how their suits look.
post #68 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recoil View Post

This is a great thread. And Dewey, I agree, it is amazing there is any market at all for newly fashionable suits. I think about the people I work with and I can think of only a handful that actually care about how their suits look.

Agreed. Most men just buy a suit and do not care about fashion/style.

But. If I look at my generation (40s) and compare it to the guys in their 20s and 30s working for me, a lot of the latter are wearing skinnier/narrower-lapelled contemporary stuff and the chaps my age aren't. The younger guys aren't - mostly - deliberately doing this as a "look" but just because it seems normal to them and is readily available. This is the perennial dynamic: I am young, I need a suit; I'd rather not dress like an old man, so I will:

- 60s: dress like Napoleon Solo;
- 70s: wear a 3-piece number with flares; possibly brown, possibly with floral tie and/or shirt;
- 80s: wear a loose-cut grey DB; or a blue chalkstripe; and butcher stripe shirt;
- 90s: wear a baggy dark grey or black 3-button SB; with a novelty sub-Hermes print tie;
- now:: wear a shortish narrow-lapelled SB number, tie optional, but if worn most likely plain and sometimes knit.

In sum: you don't have to care much at all about your appearance to be affected by marketing and the traditional wish not to dress slightly differently from your dad and his (boring, old) mates at the local Golf Club.
post #69 of 88
Thread Starter 
535
Edited by othertravel - 3/28/12 at 5:40pm
post #70 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by othertravel View Post

To add a bit of confusion to the mix, I read that most mens 'luxury' menswear (Boss, Armani, etc...) are actually bought by women. Some marketing firms did a big study and found that 70-80% of luxury menswear is bought by girlfriends/wives. Thus, Boss and Armani marketing campaigns are being increasingly steered towards women, even though they're advertising menswear.
But as a note of caution, I don't think this principle applies to NWT Sartoria Partenopea, Brioni, Kiton, etc... Only to the mass-market fashion houses.

NWT is an Ebay term. And have you ever seen the Brioni shop in Beverly Hills? I doubt that too many women bring their guys to custom tailors, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post

I agree, but mostly Valentino uomo from the period was just pulling trends/copying from other places. Virtually all the "big names" HAD a menswear line, but the vast majority of them (YSL, Dior, Valentino, Givenchy, Lanvin, etc.) were either fully licensed out, or were just afterthoughts to the women's line.
Versace, Ferre, and Armani were different, though... for they had dedicated menswear lines alongside the women's, defining trends, having runway shows, etc.

Ferre was incredible, and the rise and fall of the house (at least to shadow of its former glory) is instructive of the power of marketing and branding.
post #71 of 88
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the catch; don't know why I put 'NWT'.
post #72 of 88
This quite entertaining thread explains so much I see at thrift stores.
post #73 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post

This is backwards and wrong. Think about it.
The overwhelming majority of men easily resist such marketing. They did in the 70s and 80s and they do now today. A big majority of all suits are sold to men who cautiously buy them with the intention of wearing them as long as possible. Trendy is the last thing they want to buy.

TBH I thought that's what many men did, especially on here. Like, oh no I can't wear that suit, it's dated, the lapels are the wrong shape or width, the gorges are too low or too high, it's got cuffed pants but cuffs are currently out of vogue
Edited by MikeDT - 3/28/12 at 6:50pm
post #74 of 88
Geezer: may be a bit of an oversimplification but a very enjoyable summary of the youths' approach to suits! Hat doffed!
post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndianBoyz View Post

The Chinese became victims of that, apparantly.

I'm sure we're all victims to a certain extent.
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