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killing Trayvon - Page 293

post #4381 of 6250
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I am not Trayvon Martin.

I am a 61-year-old former hippie who has never inspired fear or hate in anyone based on my appearance.

I didn’t really follow the Zimmerman trial that closely because I thought the outcome was fairly predictable: someone shot and killed someone for no reason = guilty.

I was so elated when Obama was elected and re-elected because from my privileged perch I thought things had really changed.

I see now how foolish that notion was and I am determined to do all that I can to bring about a society that values all of its members, especially children.
post #4382 of 6250
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Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post



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I am not Trayvon. I am a lower middle class non-binary fifteen year old. One night few months ago I put on a hoodie and was walking my dog in my neighborhood, which is not the best in Miami, when a police car stopped next to me. Initially I was terrified, because Miami police are infamous for their violence, but he simply commented on the weather and asked me what breed my dog was. After I told him, he told me to stay safe, and he drove off.

I have no doubt that if I had been a person of colour, or been too poor to afford such a large dog, I would have been stopped and searched. Or shot because he thought I had a weapon.

It disgusts me that I benefit from racism.


What does "non-binary" mean in this context?

What fifteen year old in Miami spells it "colour"???

Bullshit.
post #4383 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post


Holy shit, it's Scarlett Johansson after a couple of kids. I may no longer want.
post #4384 of 6250
Spoiler those pictures, Harvey. crazy.gif
post #4385 of 6250
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I am not Trayvon Martin. Though, I did ride my bike home from babysitting a friend’s beautiful child Saturday night, through the “dangerous" streets of West Okland. I was unafraid of being pulled over by the police. I have a Chrome backpack. My handmade Etsy slippers were in there. I heard the helicopters swarming around downtown. I was proud of my city, wasting no time in voicing themselves. Words that come to my middle class, white, northern NJ brought up mind… baffled, confused, outraged, sad. So super sad. When did this even become a possibility? To kill a man. A young man. Out of what?… fear, stupidity. It’s completely outraging. I am not Trayvon Martin. But I do know heartbreak in it’s purest form. And I send all of the love I have to give to the family that will never be the same.
post #4386 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

What fifteen year old in Miami spells it "colour"???

Bullshit.

The smart ones? Btw, it was interesting to find out teh poorz cannot afford large dogs and that large dogs apparently offer safety from the police.
post #4387 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

I also see they've abandoned the "white-hispanic." He's now "white enough."

I thought I made that term up. It does sum up what a lot of people were saying but I had never seen anyone just come out and say it.
post #4388 of 6250
If anyone decides to troll that website, can I suggest that you use pictures of one of the "white" Hispanics from that Florida newspaper's stand-your-ground database?
post #4389 of 6250
This is gold.
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I am not Trayvon Martin… even though I am a Black male. You see, I talk clearly, and I rarely, if ever, use hyphenated words. I wear little round eyeglasses most of the time. And I usually don an insignia-free polo shirt, khakis and loafers. It does not hurt that I am brown and not too dark… Assimilation, I feel, is my only ally in this unsafe world. I will never know the awesomeness of rap music, the freedom of walking with a swagger, or the splendor of sporting a gold tooth. And I’ll most certainly never feel the utter softness of a fine hoodie. But, hey, I’m 33 years old. If I keep it up maybe I’ll live for another 33.
post #4390 of 6250
Ahhh, here we have the ever elusive Asian Privilege.
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I am not Trayvon Martin. I am, however, a twenty two year old Asian American man who has been called “smart” his entire life by strangers who barely even know me. A neighbor of mine, not too recently, asked me to return a book for him to the library I work at, saying, “I’m sure you’ll get the job done… you’re a smart man, I can tell.” Girls, when they want to get to know me, lavishly praise how “smart” I must be. Teachers, even if I didn’t do very well in their classes, always used to say that I was a “very bright boy” when they discussed me amongst each other.

Maybe I do act in a way that projects an image of a “smart” man, but I somehow suspect that if I wasn’t Asian, people wouldn’t think the same way, given the stereotypes that seem to exist about us being intellectual and diligent. I think it was very telling, when in high school, I was able to go up early before school began for AP classes, but any Black and Hispanic students who did the same were stopped and questioned. I think it’s strange that the word “smart” was the most frequent compliment I’ve ever heard in my life, despite being a rather average person with no extraordinary talents or skills. If I was darker skinned, that “smart” label might not have been.

I’m sure you are thinking, “oh, so people think he’s smart – big deal!” Well, that’s the thing. A large part of privilege is being able to live without people automatically making assumptions about you based off of race - being able to live as an individual. If I wasn’t an Asian male, people might have taken me seriously in high school when I complained about being depressed and stressed out. People might have stopped telling me to “deal with it” and might have actually tried to help me instead of assuming that I could handle it on my own.

Generalizations about race, gender and identity are lazy and dangerous, as it was in the case of Trayvon Martin, who was profiled for being a young black man in a hoodie.

P.S. - I also happen to be a Muslim, but I will rarely ever face the same type of discrimination faced by Black, Indian and Arab Muslims – I don’t fit the profile of a “typical” Muslim, it seems.
post #4391 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchausen View Post

I thought I made that term up. It does sum up what a lot of people were saying but I had never seen anyone just come out and say it.

That article from The Nation says it. He may not be white...but he's a white supremacist!

Seriously, one of the very saddest examples of double think the left is doing is to think that a guy that is half Jewish, half Peruvian, is a hero to the neo Nazis or Stormfront. Did you catch the swastika style emblem some idiot on DU made up with double Z's?
post #4392 of 6250
White guilt for blacks? You see something new every day.
post #4393 of 6250
You know what guys, I think we've been completely wrong about this. I just took a few moments and realized my thinking was clouded by hate and fear and that Trayvon is the innocent victim here and George deserves to be put away for life. In fact, all white people should be sent to prison and the blacks should be put in charge, kind of like South Africa when Mandela got out. I've really reconsidered my position here and know that I'm on the right thinking track. I hope you can all join me.

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I am not Trayvon Martin. I am a young white woman in Los Angeles, and I work as a social worker in a federal program for low-income, recently-homeless veterans who are looking for affordable housing. Once my guys move in to their selected apartments, I do home visits - meeting with my clients in their new apartments and talking with them about how they’re adjusting to their new roles as tenants, neighbors, community members, and rent-paying heads of household.

Last year I had a home visit with a veteran who had just moved into his 1-bedroom apartment in south LA. He was doing great, he told me as we sat on his couch, and felt optimistic about finishing truck driving school now that he had a stable place to live.

After the visit, he walked me out of his apartment, then stayed with me for the walk down the block to where I had parked my car - a white Chevy with government plates. I wore a blouse, skirt, and my work ID badge on a lanyard around my neck. I carried a cell phone and a Manila folder. I might as well have had SOCIAL WORKER stamped on my forehead.

We reached the car and were finishing our conversation, standing on the sidewalk near the passenger side. It was a sunny day, beautiful, not too hot. We stood there for almost 10 minutes, planning the date and time of the next visit, chatting about the Crimson Tide (he’s from Alabama), lawn care, the loud dog in the neighbor’s backyard. An LAPD patrol car came slowly around the corner, pulled in front of my car, and stopped. The officer in the passenger seat looked directly at me, paused, and said, "Are you OK?"

Huh?

"Uh…yes…" I said, “I’m fine-?" I answered out of genuine, dumb confusion. Why wouldn’t I be fine, officer?, went my brain. I’m standing here on the sidewalk, having a calm, friendly conversation with another adult on a lovely Los Angeles Tuesday at 11 am.

Ohhhh, I realized a second later. Oh. Oh. Of course. I should’ve known. My face changed, my brow unfurrowed. I wasn’t confused anymore. My expression turned to vile, disgusted disbelief as soon as I realized what the meaning behind his question was. I did not know what to say. I did not know what to say.

The officer looked at me for another few seconds, making sure I was allowed the opportunity to volunteer any information about how I wasn’t OK. The officer did not look at or acknowledge the man standing on the sidewalk with me at any point in our exchange. I still couldn’t think of anything to say. I am not quick on my feet like that. I’ve never had to be quick on my feet like that. He said, "I just wanted to see if you were OK," and drove away, having completed a successful check-in on a white woman possibly being assaulted by a black man. Whew. That was a close one.

I JUST WANTED TO SEE IF YOU WERE OK. He said those words to me in front of an adult man who had just invited me in to his home and offered me a sandwich and a bottled water. I was shaky with anger and couldn’t make eye contact with my client. It was my appearance and coloring that had drawn attention to us, and I was embarrassed that I had made him go through this experience. I said I was sorry about that. I was sorry that, you know, he had, I just, I was so, so sorry. I said I didn’t know what that whole thing was about, faking confusion, and shook my head and furrowed my brow for emphasis. I knew exactly what it was about.

"Aw, that’s nothing," he said, “That’s how they are round here." He had a smile on his face and the demeanor of a man who was not confused. That’s how they are. That’s how things are. He said he’d see me for next month’s home visit, and told me to drive safe.

I think it’s important to think every damn day how privilege affords me the luxury of being assumed that I am a good and innocent person. I am not Trayvon Martin.
post #4394 of 6250
hookers are so full of themselves these days.
post #4395 of 6250
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