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killing Trayvon - Page 118

post #1756 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I am sympathetic to rules that prevent radically altering the character of neighborhoods, especially historic ones. The blog "ugly persian houses" about tear-downs in LA is very funny and sad at the same time. OTOH, I am also sympathetic to property rights and I don't know where the line should be.

I don't think these values are necessarily in conflict, or at least not in deep conflict. I took property law from Richard Epstein, a prominent libertarian academic. He had no problem with negative restrictive covenants that bind everybody on the theory that a certain amount of uniformity in a neighborhood raises property values for everybody. (See Old Town Alexandria for an example with which you would be familiar.) Epstein is a libertarian for utilitarian reasons, which guides his thinking on this issue. Obviously, HOAs can get out of hand with ticky-tack rules, but I'd rather take my chances with an HOA than with a community that would allow one neighbor to grow his lawn two feet tall, another to store rusted-out junkers in the front yard, and a third to paint his house neon yellow. If that puts me with Pio as a crotchety, anal-retentive, busybody, so be it. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #1757 of 6250
Amd I though Poib was our rugged individualist!
post #1758 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I am sympathetic to rules that prevent radically altering the character of neighborhoods, especially historic ones. The blog "ugly persian houses" about tear-downs in LA is very funny and sad at the same time. OTOH, I am also sympathetic to property rights and I don't know where the line should be.

I don't think these values are necessarily in conflict, or at least not in deep conflict. I took property law from Richard Epstein, a prominent libertarian academic. He had no problem with negative restrictive covenants that bind everybody on the theory that a certain amount of uniformity in a neighborhood raises property values for everybody. (See Old Town Alexandria for an example with which you would be familiar.) Epstein is a libertarian for utilitarian reasons, which guides his thinking on this issue. Obviously, HOAs can get out of hand with ticky-tack rules, but I'd rather take my chances with an HOA than with a community that would allow one neighbor to grow his lawn two feet tall, another to store rusted-out junkers in the front yard, and a third to paint his house neon yellow. If that puts me with Pio as a crotchety, anal-retentive, busybody, so be it. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

fistbump.gif
post #1759 of 6250
This is the last ill say on the subject. In PA HOAs are strictly residential. Not a single one has a bar or liquor store.

Deal breaker.
post #1760 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post

I don't think these values are necessarily in conflict, or at least not in deep conflict. I took property law from Richard Epstein, a prominent libertarian academic. He had no problem with negative restrictive covenants that bind everybody on the theory that a certain amount of uniformity in a neighborhood raises property values for everybody. (See Old Town Alexandria for an example with which you would be familiar.) Epstein is a libertarian for utilitarian reasons, which guides his thinking on this issue. Obviously, HOAs can get out of hand with ticky-tack rules, but I'd rather take my chances with an HOA than with a community that would allow one neighbor to grow his lawn two feet tall, another to store rusted-out junkers in the front yard, and a third to paint his house neon yellow. If that puts me with Pio as a crotchety, anal-retentive, busybody, so be it. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

The problem with the argument is many cities have similar rules on such matters. The city can come cite me for not having insect screens on my operable windows or if my grass gets too long or if I have ash tree firewood on my property.

If someone wants to live in a neighborhood with HOAs, more power to them, but I certainly wouldn't want to subject myself to more restrictions than the city already imposes on me. Plus, I would bet that HOAs don't actually help home values.
post #1761 of 6250
True story, I was asked to fill the vacant spot on the town council because Mr. X retired. I said no, claiming work commitments. Truth is it would have interfered with my drinking.

Piob, and those of you in favour of hoas, would you want me on your board?

Shit. I wasnt gonna comment on this anymore. Guess I broke that promise.
post #1762 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

True story, I was asked to fill the vacant spot on the town council because Mr. X retired. I said no, claiming work commitments. Truth is it would have interfered with my drinking.
Piob, and those of you in favour of hoas, would you want me on your board?
Shit. I wasnt gonna comment on this anymore. Guess I broke that promise.

You certainly wouldn't impose any restrictions they didn't care for.
post #1763 of 6250
Sorry if this already got posted; haven't had a chance to keep up since about post 1300.
Anyway, interesting commentary by Alan Dershowitz about the affidavit and prosecutor, whose press conference he called her "campaign speech." Worth watching even if you don't like MSNBC. I also must admit having found the language of her press conference very odd, though unfortunately I don't have the time this morning to lay out some of the structures/rhetoric she used.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3096434/#47034974

Also a written piece by him:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alan-dershowitz/the-rorschach-facts-in-th_b_1418441.html
post #1764 of 6250
sorry if this was already said, but isn't there a crafty foreclosure scam exploited because of HOAs? I read an article that said there was an expedited foreclosure because of HOAs or something and people were buying homes at dirt cheap prices, renting them out and then they were again foreclosed by the bank confused.gif

edit: here's a link to further elaborate what I poorly explained

http://www.bankrate.com/financing/mortgages/1-2-million-mansion-for-10k/#ixzz1SUSyzxCw
post #1765 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post

Sorry if this already got posted; haven't had a chance to keep up since about post 1300.
Anyway, interesting commentary by Alan Dershowitz about the affidavit and prosecutor, whose press conference he called her "campaign speech." Worth watching even if you don't like MSNBC. I also must admit having found the language of her press conference very odd, though unfortunately I don't have the time this morning to lay out some of the structures/rhetoric she used.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3096434/#47034974
Also a written piece by him:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alan-dershowitz/the-rorschach-facts-in-th_b_1418441.html

Campaign speech is a good way to describe her press conference. I was baffled by the way she smiled throughout a situation that was nothing to smile or be happy about.
post #1766 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

Zimmerman apparently purchased this from the jail store. I didn't know that jails had stores.

Really? That's how much shit goes down in the clink..trading commissary items and bartering goods for purchase on inmate accounts. Aside from the obvious black market drugs, deals and whatnot... practically anything in prison can be bought, sold or traded for an item(s) from the store
post #1767 of 6250
A good friend is a criminal defense attorney. He was visiting a client in jail. The client was really distressed, because he had purchased too much toilet paper from the commissary. The issue was that he flooded the market with too much supply of toilet paper and completely killed the demand. The client apparently created a minor economic catastrophe in the jail by ruining the market for toilet paper. Those prison stores are no joke.
post #1768 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Did you read the entire example? Your peace and quiet is compromised by the constant "bounce bounce" noise of the ball and the general screaming of the kids. You are at the end of a cul de sac (I mentioned entering and exiting but did not express it clearly) and this impromptu court is between you and the entrance to the cul de sac. You have to approach carefully and sit there and wait for the kids to clear the court whenever you enter or leave.
Is this really fair?

Yes.
post #1769 of 6250
Toilet paper is one of those things they give you for free, isn't it? Was it like deluxe toilet paper or something?

I'm pretty sure Anthony Kennedy would find free toilet paper in prison to be a fundamental constitutional right. Should have sued.
post #1770 of 6250
In this prison, you were allocated a very small amount of low quality toilet paper. You could supplement it with additional paper from the prison store.
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