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Aspiring lawyer, questions on how to start - Page 4

post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post

The only solutions I can think of are for the various state Bars have are to raise the admission exam score requirements (which will send the various minority groups into an uproar), petition the ABA to raise its accreditation standards, or encourage other fields to start requiring JDs.

I don't see anyway that would happen, there's no interest group out there for the graduating law student, and the incentive to law schools and the state bars to keep admitting more and more and charging more and more is way too high. I predict the field will keep exploding for the next 10 years or so, then word will start getting out that it's probably not that great of an investment. There's still gonna be a ton of kids willing to practice law for a teacher's salary, much like many masters and phds out there, and we're gonna turn into a Singapore or Israel in terms of our legal field.
post #47 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoeShopperJ View Post

I do not remember the full details, but he was going "pro" or "majors" or something. But! He told me that he would give that all up to practice law. 

That's actually kinda heartwarming, given the sour tone of this thread so far.
post #48 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post

There's still gonna be a ton of kids willing to practice law for a teacher's salary,

Really, though? Maybe in a few fields, like criminal law, where people tend to have a lot of fun with what they do. Or if you can get by working for yourself. But slaving away in legal sweatshops like I did for my first couple years out of school? I don't see it. Literally every single prospective law student I meet is either planning on being a criminal lawyer or working in Biglaw and making a shitload of money. Nobody is looking forward to doing 4 years of document review until they can get a low paying job litigating slip and falls or cranking out consumer bankruptcies.
post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by TauKappaEpsilon View Post

Thank you all for your advice, opinions, and responses.  I've been struggling with my future career path for several years now.  I write all of the following in complete honesty, and I say this trying to sound as humble as possible.

I come from a moderately successful family who made their money in real estate, my family started out with some of the bigger names (Kushner, Hovnanian, etc.).  Real estate has always been a great option for me and I have several opportunities at my families company or at a corporate firm in Manhattan when I graduate (within the next year or two).  Although this sounds great and promising, even though the market currently sucks, I've realized I like law a lot more.  I know grades dont matter that much but I get straight As in all my law classes with very, very minimal work.  The things I learn about in my legal classes (whether its my White Collar and Commercial crime class, or my criminology class) I enjoy everything I learn and find it comes very easy to me.  I also like the logical thinking that goes into the discussions of each case study we do.  Due to my great enjoyment and academic success in my law classes I'm highly considering giving up a career in real estate to try to pursue law (even though I know its harder for a young lawyer to find a job then it is for a new home builder).  I'm fortunate enough to not have to pay for my education so I'm currently throwing around some ideas with my parents and grandparents.  I know how difficult it is to get a respectable job at a lawfirm that pays well so I've been thinking about what I can do to make myself stand out.  I was thinking that I might stay in school for a long time (almost as long as a doctor stays in school/residency).  I'm on a path to finishing my undergraduate studies a year early so I was thinking about staying there an extra year and doing a 5 year masters program.  The idea that I'm considering is to continue to stay in school after the extra year for my masters and get a PhD.  Then after having a PhD I should be able to find some kind of job I enjoy (maybe real estate) and go to law school at night for a few years.  If I get a JD and I'm barred after having a PhD and several years of work experience (and hopefully some money) I think my chances of getting a respectable position as a lawyer would be quite high, especially because I'd be able to bring in a lot of work from my previous years of work during law school.

I hope I've explained this properly, and I'm looking forward to your feedback and suggestions.  Again, I know many lawyers, but I've never sat down and really spoke to them about the best career path for myself so I really appreciate your advice.

this is gonna sound really harsh, but you come across as a self entitled douchebag. your entire post is one big humblebrag ("I don't say this to brag, BUT...").

your undergraduate classes are nothing like classes in graduate school or law school. nothing. you also don't seem to realize that EVERYONE who is in a top law program or a top PhD program has a 3.8+ and a ton of internships, etc. it is... just incredibly competitive out there. for anything. you need to have a better, more realistic understanding of your prospects.

a couple obvious, obvious issues:

* don't stay at one school for your undergrad, MA and PhD
* PhD in what field? if it's anything humanities related tack on an extra 3-4 years
* why do you assume a PhD is impressive to law schools?

edit: also never, EVER talk about coming from a privileged background. it's a huge turn off to people, because no matter how you phrase it you're saying "look I'm important and special and I have lots of connections," and I know that, for humanities programs at least, being a privileged white male is the worst possible thing for your career or admission prospects.
post #50 of 52
I will second what someone else said, that a few years of work experience are going to serve you a lot better than a Ph D would. The PhD followed by the law degree just makes you look like a lifelong student and a dilletante. An MBA might not hurt, but a few years working in business or real estate will give you experience and connections, both of which you will need.
post #51 of 52
ShoeShopperJ's advice should be followed.
post #52 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

this is gonna sound really harsh, but you come across as a self entitled douchebag. your entire post is one big humblebrag ("I don't say this to brag, BUT...").
your undergraduate classes are nothing like classes in graduate school or law school. nothing. you also don't seem to realize that EVERYONE who is in a top law program or a top PhD program has a 3.8+ and a ton of internships, etc. it is... just incredibly competitive out there. for anything. you need to have a better, more realistic understanding of your prospects.

lol, my thoughts exactly. If you think you're special because you have As, a masters, some internships, and come from a privileged family, boy do I have news for you that you are exactly average in law school.
Edited by dagman1 - 5/20/12 at 11:48pm
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