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Modern prefab housing. - Page 3

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by alflauren
I really like those designs. They were in Wired magazine about a year ago, no?

I believe so. I've only been there a few months, don't know all the publications. They've (we've) been in Dwell, Sunset, even recently had a couple pages in Smithsonian. (There is a portion of an MKD house on display at the Smithsonian currently.)
post #32 of 47
The problem with pre-fab is that it does not improve upon what the run-of-the-mill building industry supplies, which is well-constructed houses with finishing problems. The details are in the finish and no one has standardized this or simplified it. Furthermore, I have never seen pre-fab townhouses, and I am a city mouse.

Dwell, so far as I know, is the main magazine to follow developments in pre-fab, they even offer their own branded pre-fab. I just bought a 23 year-old house (my first, and hopefully, my last) and the number of superficial renovations it required and their staggering cost (~$67/sq ft, the uncertainty is in the area not the cost) was just amazing. Down the street, the McMansion specialist Toll Brothers has a development of new houses that they are building as they sell them, and already I hear terrible things about finish problems (ie floors, doors, etc NOT concrete, foundation, beams, etc).
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
I'd buy one of those pre-fab houses to plop down in the jungles of India, next to some palace ruin, a BMW 507 running dust trails around the region.

You'd catch malaria so fast your toe blood would jump out of your toes.
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
You'd catch malaria so fast your toe blood would jump out of your toes.
I'm planning to indulge my inner Howard Hughes.
post #35 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brescd01
The problem with pre-fab is that it does not improve upon what the run-of-the-mill building industry supplies, which is well-constructed houses with finishing problems. The details are in the finish and no one has standardized this or simplified it. Furthermore, I have never seen pre-fab townhouses, and I am a city mouse.

Dwell, so far as I know, is the main magazine to follow developments in pre-fab, they even offer their own branded pre-fab. I just bought a 23 year-old house (my first, and hopefully, my last) and the number of superficial renovations it required and their staggering cost (~$67/sq ft, the uncertainty is in the area not the cost) was just amazing. Down the street, the McMansion specialist Toll Brothers has a development of new houses that they are building as they sell them, and already I hear terrible things about finish problems (ie floors, doors, etc NOT concrete, foundation, beams, etc).

It's typically cheaper and has fewer ugliness issues. Plus you end up with names like "The Loftcube," which I find a lot easier to deal with than buying "The Madison" or whatever from some schlock building company.
post #36 of 47
Has anyone seen these? LivingHomes These are Ray Kappe designed, environmentally friendly, and the first was built in Santa Monica. Definitely something I would consider when I do get a house.
post #37 of 47
I've seen these houses on top of the roofs of buildings in major cities. Can anyone put shed some light on getting the roof rights to a building? edit: I'm looking into getting into architecture in the future. I just have a passion for it.
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by fg0d View Post
I've seen these houses on top of the roofs of buildings in major cities. Can anyone put shed some light on getting the roof rights to a building?

edit: I'm looking into getting into architecture in the future. I just have a passion for it.

if you own the building, you own the roof. however there are two major hurdles to adding anything on the top of your building.
  1. structural - you have to make sure the existing building will support something new on the roof - if not, you have to beef up the structure somehow.
  2. planning and zoning department - most jurisdictions will have something to say about what you can and cannot add to your building.


post #39 of 47
Introducing the Glassic Soho. One Trailor, hold the trash...
post #40 of 47
I don't know why people are seeing this as an huge innovation since Eero Saarinen designed a prefabricated house back in the '50s, which was of aluminum, I believe. Truly, history repeats especially in issues of design.
post #41 of 47
Looks like IKEA is jumping onto the Prefab bandwagon...

http://www.gizmag.com/go/7108/
http://www.boklok.co.uk/
post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I love prefeab housing, and if I ever leave a city I will consider it very seriously. There is an LA firm that has come up with some awesome stuff that is slightly more customizable while retaining all that is good about prefab:

http://www.marmolradzinerprefab.com/cp9.html

That very house (the first prefab one that MR did) is now for sale, if you want to spend $1.85 million (so much for inexpensive prefab, eh?) to live in Desert Hot Springs:

http://www.latimes.com/classified/re...me-middleright
post #43 of 47
I have seen the LABhaus prototype home and thought it was very well done. I know they just released pricing on their Ios line, which is around $40-$100k. It looks like they've managed to bring a higher design to a modest price point.


http://www.labhaus.com/models/ios/
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonick View Post
Looks like IKEA is jumping onto the Prefab bandwagon...

http://www.gizmag.com/go/7108/
http://www.boklok.co.uk/

I think Toyota also makes their own prefabs in Japan.

At least with Marmol Radziner, I am not sure there is much in cost savings buying one of their houses versus building your own.
post #45 of 47
Marmol Radziner is priced at over $300 / ft, while LABhaus is around $130 with foundation and installation.
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