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Edward Green Appreciation: Pictures, Info, and Where to Buy - Page 426

post #6376 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

I've been thinking of stepping up my boot game. I have been obsessing over the Galway. I read through about half of this thread and see some familiar faces from the Alden forum. I have 6 pairs of Alden shell boots, but now I think I might go for quality over quantity from here on out. Am I looking at the right boot?

I own north of 20 Aldens, about a third of which are shell boots, and I love the Galway more than any boot I own (though WT Ravello is a close runner-up).

 

As to the 82 last, for reference: I wear 9.5D Barrie, 10 D Plaza/Aberdeen, and my EG 82 size is 9.5/10E (UK/US).  The 82 is sleek with a rounded toe - very modern and shapely, yet timeless in its simplicity.

post #6377 of 13220
Thanks, guys. I want these more every time I look at them. I need to get myself up to Leffot and take a look.
post #6378 of 13220
FYI CitiShoes has them with the mink suede shaft.
post #6379 of 13220
Hmmmm. Suede or grain??? Decisions...
post #6380 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axelman 17 View Post

Berry is too loud for me. Check out clove suede. Perusing the EG swatch book today at Leffot and noticed it. More of a cinnamon/red rust.


Barry is loud, yes I think the same but another combination to look at may be Walnut country calf with Berry suede or shearling on the top if one wants to add a bit of colour, this may work as EG walnut is quite a dark dull colour. Being a country boot if you are making them on the 64 last I think it should not be too bright.
post #6381 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farhad19620 View Post

Barry is loud, yes I think the same but another combination to look at may be Walnut country calf with Berry suede or shearling on the top if one wants to add a bit of colour, this may work as EG walnut is quite a dark dull colour. Being a country boot if you are making them on the 64 last I think it should not be too bright.

I'd personally not worry too much about the colour of country footwear, more about the suitability of the chosen materials when dealing with the local conditions.

Just as a diversion, I've taken a few pics of a pair of WW2 Lotus veldtschoen boots which are very much the forerunner of the original Galway as it was Lotus who first made and patented the construction method.

The boots are made from zug grain and have been recently resoled. Look at the similarities with the Galway, with both being a unlined wholecut derby boot made of robust leather. Note also the full bellows tongue as opposed to the Galway's half-bellows one. These were rewaxed yesterday as I still use them, along with another pair from WW2 which I own:







The boots were often used a private purchase field boots as British Empire commissioned officers, and they were noted to be costly in their day.
post #6382 of 13220
Off to church with record snow totals for the month...dainite (and commando) sole has gotten a lot of use. I ended up using the TZ 120cm unwaxed 2-3mm laces as replacements.

post #6383 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

I've been thinking of stepping up my boot game. I have been obsessing over the Galway. I read through about half of this thread and see some familiar faces from the Alden forum. I have 6 pairs of Alden shell boots, but now I think I might go for quality over quantity from here on out. Am I looking at the right boot?

The Galway is a great boot. I have it in dark oak antique/mink suede with HAF sole on the 82 and in bronze antique/black country calf with Dainite on the 82. I wear uk9e. I am 9d on Alden's Barrie.

Bronze antique gets little discussion on this thread; however, it might be my favorite EG color. Having said that, I do own more dark oak than bronze. A guy can never go wrong with dark oak either.
post #6384 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTBrummie View Post


I'd personally not worry too much about the colour of country footwear, more about the suitability of the chosen materials when dealing with the local conditions.

Just as a diversion, I've taken a few pics of a pair of WW2 Lotus veldtschoen boots which are very much the forerunner of the original Galway as it was Lotus who first made and patented the construction method.

The boots are made from zug grain and have been recently resoled. Look at the similarities with the Galway, with both being a unlined wholecut derby boot made of robust leather. Note also the full bellows tongue as opposed to the Galway's half-bellows one. These were rewaxed yesterday as I still use them, along with another pair from WW2 which I own:
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)






The boots were often used a private purchase field boots as British Empire commissioned officers, and they were noted to be costly in their day.

 

Wow, I'm extremely impressed by how nice the leather is holding up! The last doubts I've had regarding the zug/heather gorse are gone. How do you treat zug? Snow seal? Also, the sole appears to be a double leather (please correct me if I'm wrong) – is there any specific reason you have chosen to keep the leather sole instead of having them replaced by for example ridgeway?

 

Cheers,

SKM

post #6385 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by S K M View Post

Wow, I'm extremely impressed by how nice the leather is holding up! The last doubts I've had regarding the zug/heather gorse are gone. How do you treat zug? Snow seal? Also, the sole appears to be a double leather (please correct me if I'm wrong) – is there any specific reason you have chosen to keep the leather sole instead of having them replaced by for example ridgeway?

Cheers,
SKM

Zug is almost indestructible, the other pair are in better condition despite also being around 70 years old. The zug on the other pair is much redder and the boots are actually more substantial than the pair shown above.

I got them resoled with a leather sole in keeping with their original incarnation - most of these had hobnails in the sole too which didn't appeal! I wanted to keep the low profile so they looked as they would always have. This is likely their last resole before nothing more can be done so I had cover soles added to stave off the inevitable. The original soles split horizontally, if that makes sense, and the Shoe Healer said it was a tricky resole because the sole edge had been ground down to right by the veldtschoen stitching where the leather was turned out.

The other pair I own still have their original soles.

As with any outdoor boots, any kind of dubbin would help water resistance although zug grain is actually a waxy leather that is great in the wet as it comes.
post #6386 of 13220

^^Marvelous, I'm extremely impressed. That's yet another reason we need to do the rough out Galway in heather gorse/suede – so we something to enjoy for the rest of our lives and eventually pass on to our sons, ha!

 

Anyway, once you get a chance I'd be very curious to see your other vintage pair in zug.

 

All the best,

SKM

post #6387 of 13220

What is Zug, exactly?  Is it something other than simple pebble grain leather?

post #6388 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

What is Zug, exactly?  Is it something other than simple pebble grain leather?

It's a heavy duty embossed waxy gorse calf, not often seen these days.
post #6389 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTBrummie View Post

I'd personally not worry too much about the colour of country footwear, more about the suitability of the chosen materials when dealing with the local conditions.

Just as a diversion, I've taken a few pics of a pair of WW2 Lotus veldtschoen boots which are very much the forerunner of the original Galway as it was Lotus who first made and patented the construction method.

The boots are made from zug grain and have been recently resoled. Look at the similarities with the Galway, with both being a unlined wholecut derby boot made of robust leather. Note also the full bellows tongue as opposed to the Galway's half-bellows one. These were rewaxed yesterday as I still use them, along with another pair from WW2 which I own:







The boots were often used a private purchase field boots as British Empire commissioned officers, and they were noted to be costly in their day.

These are great boots although quite similar to the Galway boots I do like the full bellows tongue .
post #6390 of 13220
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTBrummie View Post


It's a heavy duty embossed waxy gorse calf, not often seen these days.


Thanks.

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