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Edward Green Appreciation: Pictures, Info, and Where to Buy - Page 1500

post #22486 of 28984
nm.
Edited by dieworkwear - 10/11/15 at 2:45pm
post #22487 of 28984
.
Edited by ike_hiking_boots - 10/14/15 at 2:49am
post #22488 of 28984
LS sure is posting a lot of EG lately on their ig account.
post #22489 of 28984
Quote:
Originally Posted by bespoken pa View Post

LS sure is posting a lot of EG lately on their ig account.
Are EGs the ones with the big capital "N" on the sides?
post #22490 of 28984
Only the ones made with horween leather are EG the basic models are allen edmonds.
post #22491 of 28984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

It is the leather, not the burnishing or "superficial patina".  They are quite clear.  I did not expect something like that from EG.  

 

To me that is a Rejected shoe.

 

Sorry if anyone is tired of this, but I'd like to re-visit it as I've been in contact with my retailer as well as my local cobbler as someone earlier had suggested (I'll re-post a pic below for reminder).  My local cobbler felt the leather on the quarters and said that he believed it to be a problem with the way the leather was stretched over the heel and that in his experience it could result in cracking several years down the road.  My retailer told me they thought it was a problem in the finish and suggested a nourishing creme followed by buffing and offered a slight discount.  When I responded that my cobbler had advised having the shoes exchanged they said they could arrange a pickup to have the shoes shipped to EG for a re-finish.  My concern here is that I will end up incurring both shipping costs and an invoice for refinishing what are brand new shoes only to get back a pair of shoes that still has wrinkles in the leather.  

 

Any further advice?  This model is out of stock at the retailer, so would I be better off exchanging for something that's in stock?  That'd be a shame because I really like the shoe, but the prospect of having such an expensive shoe with wrinkled quarters that may end up cracking is tough to swallow.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

post #22492 of 28984
Better off? It really depends on you, you selected this model for a reason. I would stick with it see what EG can do with the shipping costs are minimal considering we are discussing $1500 footwear. Good luck with whatever you decide.
post #22493 of 28984
I could be wrong but it doesn't look like a finishing issue to me and if it isn't I don't see how this will change after they refinish it, so have you asked them what they will be willing to do if the condition doesn't change after the refinish? Are these going thru the retailer and ar they checking these when they come back before they forward them back to you?
post #22494 of 28984

Although @dddrees and I don't agree on most things (at least we pretend we don't agree), I totally agree with him on this.  It certainly doesn't look like refinishing them will resolve it.  Calling on @DWFII.  You couldn't get a more knowledgeable response than from him, if he can tell from that pic.

post #22495 of 28984
Quote:
Originally Posted by willsgillen View Post

Sorry if anyone is tired of this, but I'd like to re-visit it as I've been in contact with my retailer as well as my local cobbler as someone earlier had suggested (I'll re-post a pic below for reminder).  My local cobbler felt the leather on the quarters and said that he believed it to be a problem with the way the leather was stretched over the heel and that in his experience it could result in cracking several years down the road.  My retailer told me they thought it was a problem in the finish and suggested a nourishing creme followed by buffing and offered a slight discount.  When I responded that my cobbler had advised having the shoes exchanged they said they could arrange a pickup to have the shoes shipped to EG for a re-finish.  My concern here is that I will end up incurring both shipping costs and an invoice for refinishing what are brand new shoes only to get back a pair of shoes that still has wrinkles in the leather.  

Any further advice?  This model is out of stock at the retailer, so would I be better off exchanging for something that's in stock?  That'd be a shame because I really like the shoe, but the prospect of having such an expensive shoe with wrinkled quarters that may end up cracking is tough to swallow.

Thanks in advance.




Those were sold as new in that condition? That's an embarrassment. I would return them and get a refund. If it's a stock model another retailer will have them in stock, or you can do a MTO, or just wait for a restock.
post #22496 of 28984
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoosicPa View Post

Those were sold as new in that condition? That's an embarrassment. I would return them and get a refund. If it's a stock model another retailer will have them in stock, or you can do a MTO, or just wait for a restock.
Agree with moosicpa 100%
post #22497 of 28984
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post

Calling on @DWFII

All I can do is speculate--it's just a photo, after all, and sometimes even hands-on examination won't reveal an easy answer.

That said, I was reading The Chemistry of Leather Manufacture by John Arthur Wilson recently and ran across...if I understood the section...the idea that leather tends to tan, or absorb tannins, unevenly. The author was talking about vegetable tans specifically but it occurred to me that the same concept might apply to chrome tans as well.
Quote:
In practice, complete saturation of the protein with tannin is rarely, if ever, accomplished. In the ordinary methods this would require many months and might prove undesirable, if accomplished. The surface of the skin is in contact with the tannin for a considerably longer period of time than the middle portion and consequently, is always more heavily tanned. This is further accentuated by the fact that the liquor finally reaching the interior is more dilute than that at the surface, having lost some of its tannin through combination with protein on the way. If the difference in in degree of tannage of the surface and interior regions is very great, the skin will either be distorted or else the grain surface will break up into coarse wrinkles upon bending the leather inward, which is undesirable. The reason for this is that the area of the layers tends to increase with the degree of tannage, giving the grain layer a greater area than the middle layer.

I don't know whether the shoes in question are chrome or veg but Wilson's description seems familiar. At the very least, it seems evident that there is a disassociation/disconnect between the grain layer and the corium.

Wilson goes on to say that there are ways to mitigate these problems (it gets quite detailed and scientific in subsequent paragraphs) such that the best calf will always have a fine "break."

Almost as troubling...if I am seeing what I think I am seeing...is the dark spot. Almost as if the leather had been rubbed so vigourously...perhaps in an attempt to smooth the wrinkles...that the finish was damaged or broken and subsequent waxing or recolouring darkened the underlying leather.

Anyway that's about all I have to offer...mostly speculation--take it for what it's worth.
post #22498 of 28984
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Almost as troubling...if I am seeing what I think I am seeing...is the dark spot. Almost as if the leather had been rubbed so vigourously...perhaps in an attempt to smooth the wrinkles...that the finish was damaged or broken and subsequent waxing or recolouring darkened the underlying leather.

Not joking: most of us pay the $1,000 premium EG charges over other GY makers precisely because their shoes have those dark spots.

::hides::
post #22499 of 28984
Lol
post #22500 of 28984
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


Not joking: most of us pay the $1,000 premium EG charges over other GY makers precisely because their shoes have those dark spots.

::hides::

I'm going to have to agree with this....While no expert...the markings look normal to me....I only have 4 pair of E.G. that I got from "last pair" sales(so I didn't shop every detail of E.G. versus buying bargains), but it's common amongst my shoes....Of course I'm just going off of my collection...and after 2-3 years of use, my comparison may not be fair... leather "wears" and that includes the fine "cracks" that are often (mis)seen as damage versus being natural...There is a difference between dry mistreated cracked leather....and leather that has been properly cared for.....Im' sitting here looking at my Newmarkets....and the burnishing and "cracking" add character in my opinion...

 

I'm not sure of the background story....but if  they have been "tried-on" dozens of times in the store.... yes...that wear will show...even as a BNIB pair....

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