or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Edward Green Appreciation: Pictures, Info, and Where to Buy
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Edward Green Appreciation: Pictures, Info, and Where to Buy - Page 75

post #1111 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post


oh is this like when I was looking online for the address for 'Wet and Wild'  theme park  and had to tell the children to look away?

this covers it pretty much. you're a very clever man happy.gif
post #1112 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post


Westbound-  the Canterbury ^^  is def on the 82 and looks a lot like your Lichfield no?

I was trying to get that damn picture to load for like 5 minutes. But yea', save for the medallion, they look identical.

Aren't a lot of the EG lasts very similar, though? 32, 33, 82, 88?

...actually, I think the medallion on the Lichfield may be slightly different, but I can't zoom in enough on the pair I posted to be certain. It's close enough, though.
Edited by Westbound - 9/6/12 at 11:12pm
post #1113 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westbound View Post


I was trying to get that damn picture to load for like 5 minutes. But yea', save for the medallion, they look identical.
Aren't a lot of the EG lasts very similar, though? 32, 33, 82, 88?
...actually, I think the medallion on the Lichfield may be slightly different, but I can't zoom in enough on the pair I posted to be certain. It's close enough, though.

 

 

great article on the last evolution by forum member Dan -  'Uptown Dandy'  http://uptowndandy.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/evolution-of-last-edward-green-from-to.html

 

 

.... and don't understand it, but on no lesser authority than an old post by Andrew Portnoy  have confirmation that these are Telfords, on the 82-  identical medallion to yours, and definitely not MTO

 


Edited by Pliny - 9/7/12 at 12:04am
post #1114 of 13951
^ Brilliant! Thank you, sir - for both the link and the effort. I appreciate it. Them's some real beauties.
post #1115 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

I find the 202 really hard to match with trousers.

What does this mean?
post #1116 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post


... and according to Sevan Minasian of 'Classic Shoes for Men':

Norwegian/Goiser Construction:
The term "Norwegian" is used promiscuously to refer to several styles of shoe, notably the "Split-Toe Norwegian" with its outward turned moccasin-like apron and joining at the toe, and among Italian shoemakers, of a variety styles with decorative double sewn welts. Unlike in the present shoe, the sewing is mostly non-functional and conceals construction even as rudimentary as Blake Stitching. Very few of those are the true complex Goiser/Norwegian construction, wherin both the split reverse welt and the top leather are turned outward and sewn to the street sole, as shown here.This is the most complex of all shoe construction techniques and very few such shoes are produced in the world.
The term "Goiser" is derived from Bad Goisern in the Salzkammergut region of Austria. This construction was once commonly found in hand-made all-purpose mountain shoes worn in that region of the Alps and was intended to prevent water from entering through the seams.

I believe in this quote, split reverse welt and Goiserer/Bentivegna welt are muddled-up.

The conventional welt is stitched underneath the shoe. The 'split-reverse welt' is split lengthwise at half the thickness and half the width. The top section forms a lip going up the shoe and the lower section is stitched conventionally underneath (no additional and visible row of stitching). The Goiserer/Bentigegna welt is not split, but stitched to the outside of the shoe. So. there is a visible and decorative row of stitches. 'Norwegian construction' has the upper leather turned outside, taking the function of the welt.

Different shoemakers/firms have developed their own hybrid versions and might threat the visible rows of stitching in a more decorative manner. (Some of these decorative stitches were even invented to hide the fact that the functional stitches are spaced quite far apart, as big stitches speed-up the process and save time and money.)

Then there is the 'Norwegian' style of shoe, which. of course can be produced in any type of construction. Member 'dopey' owns a pair of bespoke shoes (made by Janne Melkersson) which are 'Norwegian' in style and construction. A rare beast indeed.

As you might know from Rose Nylund ('Golden Girls') things Norwegian are always complicated: "We in St. Olaf........"
post #1117 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by kolecho View Post


What does this mean?

well, just my own quirk, not saying anyone else feels or should feel, this .

to my eye the 202 tends to look 'vintage' in a way that say the 82 does not. I'm not keen on vintage because it looks costumey to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post


I believe in this quote, split reverse welt and Goiserer/Bentivegna welt are muddled-up.
The conventional welt is stitched underneath the shoe. The 'split-reverse welt' is split lengthwise at half the thickness and half the width. The top section forms a lip going up the shoe and the lower section is stitched conventionally underneath (no additional and visible row of stitching). The Goiserer/Bentigegna welt is not split, but stitched to the outside of the shoe. So. there is a visible and decorative row of stitches. 'Norwegian construction' has the upper leather turned outside, taking the function of the welt.
Different shoemakers/firms have developed their own hybrid versions and might threat the visible rows of stitching in a more decorative manner. (Some of these decorative stitches were even invented to hide the fact that the functional stitches are spaced quite far apart, as big stitches speed-up the process and save time and money.)
Then there is the 'Norwegian' style of shoe, which. of course can be produced in any type of construction. Member 'dopey' owns a pair of bespoke shoes (made by Janne Melkersson) which are 'Norwegian' in style and construction. A rare beast indeed.
As you might know from Rose Nylund ('Golden Girls') things Norwegian are always complicated: "We in St. Olaf........"

 

 

Bengal, dumb question-  are you saying the leather is split to half its depth ?  like from 2mm to 1mm thick?

 

(altho the point is, as u already said, that the SC pictured was not Goiserer) .

 

I was told this 2nd shoe from bott is Goiserer, and the welt leather pokeing up looks quite thick, so prob not split depth-wise....

post #1118 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

I believe in this quote, split reverse welt and Goiserer/Bentivegna welt are muddled-up.
The conventional welt is stitched underneath the shoe. The 'split-reverse welt' is split lengthwise at half the thickness and half the width. The top section forms a lip going up the shoe and the lower section is stitched conventionally underneath (no additional and visible row of stitching). The Goiserer/Bentigegna welt is not split, but stitched to the outside of the shoe. So. there is a visible and decorative row of stitches. 'Norwegian construction' has the upper leather turned outside, taking the function of the welt.
Different shoemakers/firms have developed their own hybrid versions and might threat the visible rows of stitching in a more decorative manner. (Some of these decorative stitches were even invented to hide the fact that the functional stitches are spaced quite far apart, as big stitches speed-up the process and save time and money.)
Then there is the 'Norwegian' style of shoe, which. of course can be produced in any type of construction. Member 'dopey' owns a pair of bespoke shoes (made by Janne Melkersson) which are 'Norwegian' in style and construction. A rare beast indeed.
As you might know from Rose Nylund ('Golden Girls') things Norwegian are always complicated: "We in St. Olaf........"


+1. The Norwegian (sometimes called Norvegese) welt and Norwegian style shoe are not the same thing.

IMHO the most distinguishing feature of a norwegian style shoe is the split toe which is done differently by different makers.
post #1119 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post


Guys, I found this very interesting explanation of the 'Norweger' style.  Looks like it did indeed come from Norway to GB, the States and the rest of Europe

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
In the late 19th century, fishermen and farmers in Aurland and the Sognefjord area in Western Norway were known for making light moccasin style shoes, initially for their own use, but occasionally for sale, which developed into a cottage industry.




In the second half of the 19th century, there was an influx of upper-class British sports salmon fishermen to the rivers of coastal Norway, particularly western Norway. The salmon season would start in mid-summer, and would last into early autumn. The “salmon lords”, as they were called locally, wanted a light shoe that could easily be slipped on and off during riverside fishing.




Two villagers, Vebjørn S. Vangen and Andreas S. Vangen, started making and repairing shoes for the British fishermen, until production of the light moccasin became a full-time employment for them. 




Another villager, Nils Tveranger, was the first to start regular production of the model still known in Norway as the ”Aurland shoe”. It was exhibited at the Paris exposition in 1900. The Aurland shoe obtained its present form in the twenties.




After WWII, production increased greatly, and in the 1950’s around 90 people in the village were employed in shoe production, in 12 different small workshops in the village. This industry dominated the life of the entire village, just on the strength of employment numbers. The present firm called “Aurlandsko” was established in the late forties.




In the late sixties, a hydro-electric power-plant was built near Aurdal, and most people in the village found better-paid work at the power-plant. The factory presently has six employees. Production, which in the early years was mainly done in private homes and small shops, is today centralized in a modern factory. 




Bass “Weejuns”: In 1876, George Henry Bass created the G.H. Bass shoe company, and in 1910 he introduced the camp “Mocc”, a soft leather moccasin that challenged the hard dress shoes of the day. In 1936 the Bass Shoe Co introduced an adaptation of a Norwegian fishermen moccasin style shoe named “Weejun” combining “Norwegian” and “Injun”. Weejuns are also referred to as penny loafers because of a semi-pocket featured on the vamp, into which a penny can be slipped.


BTW  the Aurland shoe factory is still there in Norway, as a 'museum-factotry' still producing the original Norweger..  
http://www.visitflam.com/aurland-shoe-factory/

Sos about the non-EG discussion, but's interesting.

I find it refreshing to look into the historical background of footwear. this pretty much describes my approach to my personal choices.

to make your confusion complete. this model is called "Medaillon" due to the quarter seam. enjoy.

gk13.jpg

in the tree workshop.
DSC00109.jpg
post #1120 of 13951
iirc, this picture belongs to harrydog. a picture is like a genetical fingerprint and this carries the handwriting of HD, imo.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post


post #1121 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post


I find it refreshing to look into the historical background of footwear. this pretty much describes my approach to my personal choices.
to make your confusion complete. this model is called "Medaillon" due to the quarter seam. enjoy.
gk13.jpg
in the tree workshop.
 

 

A-H of course?  the upper construction is almost identidcal with the Demeter-Halmos on previous page, including the back-strap and the kissing toe seam.  Must be a tradition?

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

iirc, this picture belongs to harrydog. a picture is like a genetical fingerprint and this carries the handwriting of HD, imo.

 

amazing, yes Harrydog, but quite some time ago.  4.5 yrs!   that is a serious shoe-memory, esp for someone who is no EG fan.  Bought at a factory sale in 2008

post #1122 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

well, just my own quirk, not saying anyone else feels or should feel, this .
to my eye the 202 tends to look 'vintage' in a way that say the 82 does not. I'm not keen on vintage because it looks costumey to me.


Bengal, dumb question-  are you saying the leather is split to half its depth ?  like from 2mm to 1mm thick?


A traditionally handmade ‘split-reverse’ (‘stormwelt’ in English) looks something like this:

welt.png

The leather strip is partially split; the lower section is stitched underneath while the upper section forms a lip
against the shoe. Unlike the Goiserer/Bentivegna, you won’t see any additional stitching on the outside of the shoe:
post #1123 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

A-H of course?  the upper construction is almost identidcal with the Demeter-Halmos on previous page, including the back-strap and the kissing toe seam.  Must be a tradition?

Guyla Kiss, one of the greatest I have ever met. certainly, I'm biased, though. I've seen the work frome some of the best in the world in flesh, so I allow myself this judgement. the back strap is tradition and I love it. not sure what you mean by the kissing toe seam?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

amazing, Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
yes Harrydog, but quite some time ago.  4.5 yrs!   that is a serious shoe-memory,
esp for someone who is no EG fan.  

it's the arrangement of the pic and the quality of the pic. ap never had the depth and never pictured boxes.

not a fan, oh well. i'm happy, when you guys are happy. never forget, we, who write and participate here in a disiplined manner have one in common - we love shoes and not solely ours collection.
post #1124 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post


Guyla Kiss, one of the greatest I have ever met. certainly, I'm biased, though. I've seen the work frome some of the best in the world in flesh, so I allow myself this judgement. the back strap is tradition and I love it. not sure what you mean by the kissing toe seam?
it's the arrangement of the pic and the quality of the pic. ap never had the depth and never pictured boxes.
not a fan, oh well. i'm happy, when you guys are happy. never forget, we, who write and participate here in a disiplined manner have one in common - we love shoes and not solely ours collection.

 

 

I mean the way the lips of the leather at the split on the toe are pinched, sewn, then trimmed -  as opposed to ghosted the EG way or an overlap seam as seen on the 'lake' of the Demeter-Halmos.

post #1125 of 13951
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post


A traditionally handmade ‘split-reverse’ (‘stormwelt’ in English) looks something like this:

welt.png
The leather strip is partially split; the lower section is stitched underneath while the upper section forms a lip
against the shoe. Unlike the Goiserer/Bentivegna, you won’t see any additional stitching on the outside of the shoe:

 

 

oka thanks-  I'm surprised as I didn't think this was possible.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Edward Green Appreciation: Pictures, Info, and Where to Buy