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The official "Ask Man of Lint" resurrection thread. - Page 5

post #61 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnwes View Post

Funny, I get all of my supplies from that guy. Thanks.

I just chose the cheapest / best feedback and was very impressed how fast it got here.
 

 

 

post #62 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post

I just chose the cheapest / best feedback and was very impressed how fast it got here.
 

 

 



He has been great in all of my dealings with him. He even fulfilled requests for products he didn't normally stock.

 

post #63 of 108
Great thread.

MOL, I have recently bought a Temple Of Jawnz VTG Collared Moto jacket, like the one seen below.

120

I find it a beautiful piece, but right now it is tough as nails and stiff (stands upright on it own). There are a few recommended ways to soften this jacket, the most common methods involving the use of Obenauf's oil.

Poster Dellath has done some great work on his TOJ VTG jacket if you see his posts on the TOJ thread in SW&D. This is a pic he posted a while back, after a few applications of Obenauf's and general wear.

700

My question to you:

I think Dellath has done a great job and I will most likely try and emulate him. But I wanted to check if you have alternate suggestions on how I can get this jacket to soften up, acquire deep/ 'interesting' colors?

Thanks in advance.
post #64 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by PipersSon View Post

Great thread.
MOL, I have recently bought a Temple Of Jawnz VTG Collared Moto jacket, like the one seen below.
120
I find it a beautiful piece, but right now it is tough as nails and stiff (stands upright on it own). There are a few recommended ways to soften this jacket, the most common methods involving the use of Obenauf's oil.
Poster Dellath has done some great work on his TOJ VTG jacket if you see his posts on the TOJ thread in SW&D. This is a pic he posted a while back, after a few applications of Obenauf's and general wear.

My question to you:
I think Dellath has done a great job and I will most likely try and emulate him. But I wanted to check if you have alternate suggestions on how I can get this jacket to soften up, acquire deep/ 'interesting' colors?
Thanks in advance.

PipersSon, Congratulations on your purchase.
I own a vintage black leather motorcycle jacket by Brush Fire, a manufacturer from Winnipeg, Canada.. My jacket, like yours, can stand on its own. Though I am no leather expert, I believe the thickness and toughness of the leather was intentional to provide maximum body protection should the wearer fall of their motor bike. Therefore, it would be prudent to give it occasional applications of leather lotion / conditioner. to maintain leather health and pliability.

Because it is vintage, you'll want to apply leather lotion by hand, gently and thoroughly working the lotion into the leather. Your jacket may darken the leather while it is wet but once dry it should return to its original colour. Once dry, wipe with a terrycloth.
Repeat if necessary or at least 4 times a year. That is what I do with my jacket.
While I appreciate the vote of confidence I must recommend you make a new thread on this topic.
A suggested thread title would be 'Softening a Vintage Leather Motorcycle Jacket'. There are members as you know, who are leather specialists and will probably give you better advice. Hope this helps.
post #65 of 108
MOL, thank you for your reply; as usual - based on what I have read from you elsewhere on SF plus the obvious evidence in this thread - you have been very generous in sharing your knowledge. Much appreciated.

I think the VTG stands for vegetable tan though.
post #66 of 108
I am but a lowly servant and the honour is mine, thank you.
post #67 of 108

Mr. MOL, I am having major concerns about my new (old vtg) shell cordovan shoes. This is my first pair so do not know how these should look. I have applied conditioner and brushed them for about 10 minutes. They look great. Wore them around the house for a few minutes but noticed that where the creases are the color becomes very light. This is a concern after seeing the picture of the dry rotted pair of shell from a few weeks ago that ripped along the seam. Is the lighting of the color normal for dark colored shell or should I cut my losses before any major damage occurs rendering them worthless and look for a new pair. Thanks as always!

 

 

Photobucket

Photobucket

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post #68 of 108

^^^ I'm fairly certain that is normal from leather flexing during wear. Even new shells lighten like that.

 

Example:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/234503/new-alden-cordovan-excessiving-creasing-w-pics/0_50

 

Also, I like this info as well, but you may have seen this already.

http://www.alden-of-carmel.com/index.cfm/care_of_shell_cordovan.htm

post #69 of 108

OOPS Wrong thread,

post #70 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post

Mr. MOL, I am having major concerns about my new (old vtg) shell cordovan shoes. This is my first pair so do not know how these should look. I have applied conditioner and brushed them for about 10 minutes. They look great. Wore them around the house for a few minutes but noticed that where the creases are the color becomes very light. This is a concern after seeing the picture of the dry rotted pair of shell from a few weeks ago that ripped along the seam. Is the lighting of the color normal for dark colored shell or should I cut my losses before any major damage occurs rendering them worthless and look for a new pair. Thanks as always!

How did I miss this one...my apologies.
I would recommed starting a new thread on shell cordovan care if one doesn't already exist. As I am no expert on anything I am unable to provide you with a reliable answer to this.
Many leather experts here will render the best information and I look forward to learning too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by capnwes View Post

OOPS Wrong thread,

smile.gif Amen to that.
post #71 of 108
MOL, I know you've claimed not to be a shell expert, but perhaps you can, nonetheless, help out here if you know anything about edge dressing.

http://www.styleforum.net/t/295596/edge-dressing-and-vintage-shell-cordovan/0_30#post_5350379
post #72 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeH View Post

MOL, I know you've claimed not to be a shell expert, but perhaps you can, nonetheless, help out here if you know anything about edge dressing.

http://www.styleforum.net/t/295596/edge-dressing-and-vintage-shell-cordovan/0_30#post_5350379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeH View Post

I recently bought a pair of vintage Florsheim SC v-cleat longwings in pretty nice condition, the original heel is hardly even worn down much. Only problem, somebody tried to apply edge dressing to the soles and got a little (lot) sloppy with the stuff. I'm assuming that this was done in an attempt to make the soles look fresher for an ebay auction (why oh why?) so it wouldn't be very old in that case. Regardless, what do I do. I read a thread suggesting Afta, now called Guardsman, but does the same rule apply to Shell? Shell experts, please weigh in.

021.jpg
022.jpg
023.jpg


I can only tell you what I would do if they were mine.
If that will be acceptable, this is what I would do:

1) Remove the laces and take the shoes in my hands. I would feel the leather. This is to test pliability or how easily the leather bends. You don't have to be rough but, for example, bend the tongue of the shoes. See if the shell still has enough of its natural oils and strength. If you sense that it is too brittle, then do not proceed any further.

2) If it is determined that the shell is still tough enough and pliable, I would wet a terrycloth, ring out the water, so make it damp, then apply leather lotion to the shoes and let them sit for an hour. Then wipe off any excess.

3) Then, in a well ventilated area (or better yet, outside in daylight) wearing rubbler gloves (the kind you wash dishes with is fine) Take some Acetone on a DRY terrycloth and swiftly pass over the blackened area. If the dye has not penetrated the shell, it should come off. If the sye HAS penetrated the shell, you can try a second pass with a refreshed application of acetone on a terrycloth.
If the colour of the shell lightens in that area (it may or may not happen on the first pass) then you'll have to do the entire shoe to maintain a consistent colour.
DIsclaimer: Personally, I have never done this on shell but the acetone is your only hope if you can't live with the black marks, then you should be able to get most of it off.

4) The worst that can heppen is that you have lightened the shoes and minimised the black.
The best that can happen is to be completely successful and lose the black marks altogether but still lighten the overall shoe colour.

5) If successful or not, you must get moisture and oils back into the leather. Shell or not, acetone wil WILL remove oils so you need to apply leather lotion or whatever special lotion you would use on shell to prevent cracking. You may have to apply a few times over 24 hours just to make sure.

Again, this is what I would do if they were mine and only if the shell is in good strong condition.
Before starting any project like this one, I would be at the pont of 'do it or I'll never wear them'. This is what gives the courage to experiment in that one is willing to lose the shoes to gain the knowledge. The final choice is yours ofcourse. Personally those black marks would bother me and I would proceed, but that is me being a perfectionist about it.
You may want to contact Nick V or DWF and see what they have to say as they have far more knowledge and hands-on experience with shell.
Be patient and get as much input as possible before deciding what course of action to take.
Hope this helps....if you do proceed and it works, the post photos!
post #73 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post

Not hookers blood but close and you can suggest something as I honestly did not steal it, even though one of the security ink packets exploded on the end of the jacket arm...

Place a black dot in the middle and turn it into a poppy.


Thanks for the advise. The black dot helped it sell on ebay! lol8[1].gif

post #74 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

I can only tell you what I would do if they were mine.
If that will be acceptable, this is what I would do:
1) Remove the laces and take the shoes in my hands. I would feel the leather. This is to test pliability or how easily the leather bends. You don't have to be rough but, for example, bend the tongue of the shoes. See if the shell still has enough of its natural oils and strength. If you sense that it is too brittle, then do not proceed any further.
2) If it is determined that the shell is still tough enough and pliable, I would wet a terrycloth, ring out the water, so make it damp, then apply leather lotion to the shoes and let them sit for an hour. Then wipe off any excess.
3) Then, in a well ventilated area (or better yet, outside in daylight) wearing rubbler gloves (the kind you wash dishes with is fine) Take some Acetone on a DRY terrycloth and swiftly pass over the blackened area. If the dye has not penetrated the shell, it should come off. If the sye HAS penetrated the shell, you can try a second pass with a refreshed application of acetone on a terrycloth.
If the colour of the shell lightens in that area (it may or may not happen on the first pass) then you'll have to do the entire shoe to maintain a consistent colour.
DIsclaimer: Personally, I have never done this on shell but the acetone is your only hope if you can't live with the black marks, then you should be able to get most of it off.
4) The worst that can heppen is that you have lightened the shoes and minimised the black.
The best that can happen is to be completely successful and lose the black marks altogether but still lighten the overall shoe colour.
5) If successful or not, you must get moisture and oils back into the leather. Shell or not, acetone wil WILL remove oils so you need to apply leather lotion or whatever special lotion you would use on shell to prevent cracking. You may have to apply a few times over 24 hours just to make sure.
Again, this is what I would do if they were mine and only if the shell is in good strong condition.
Before starting any project like this one, I would be at the pont of 'do it or I'll never wear them'. This is what gives the courage to experiment in that one is willing to lose the shoes to gain the knowledge. The final choice is yours ofcourse. Personally those black marks would bother me and I would proceed, but that is me being a perfectionist about it.
You may want to contact Nick V or DWF and see what they have to say as they have far more knowledge and hands-on experience with shell.
Be patient and get as much input as possible before deciding what course of action to take.
Hope this helps....if you do proceed and it works, the post photos!

Thanks for the suggestions. I typically use Venetian Cream on shell (and others as well), do you think that is adequate for crack prevention or do you know of anything better?
post #75 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post

Not hookers blood but close and you can suggest something as I honestly did not steal it, even though one of the security ink packets exploded on the end of the jacket arm...


Place a black dot in the middle and turn it into a poppy.


Thanks for the advise. The black dot helped it sell on ebay! lol8%5B1%5D.gif

Great news. Photos of the poppy?
What happens when your buyer signs up here trying to find information on the rare poppy variation and its worh?
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