or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › He got fired because he was better dressed than the Boss?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

He got fired because he was better dressed than the Boss? - Page 3

post #31 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young Gentleman View Post

Oh, sorry I forgot to mention that he is actually quite a bit older than me, at 34. Most of the bespoke suits were financed by an inheritance from his rich Father but he did not make that bad an earning before anyway at €90000 a year. Fact is that his dress style worked just fine and nobody said anything to him for over 3 years until the new boss (whom happens to be about the same age as him) decided to attend client meetings and felt intimidated by his employee's imposing style.

When I asked my friend if he would take legal action he said that he'd rather work for another company than keep working for this boss. At the moment he is in Dubai for an interview with another firm.

1. No matter what anybody here says about dressing for yourself, you dress for the sitaution. Your friend was dumb for dressing in a way that was not appropriate for the situation.
2. It's good that he doesn't intend to sue because he has no case.

Just bc you have something flashy doesn't mean it's appropriate for the office. If I came into an inheritance this afternoon and bought a Ferrari, I sure as hell wouldn't drive it to work. In fact, none of my coworkers would know about it.
post #32 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElDave View Post

1. No matter what anybody here says about dressing for yourself, you dress for the sitaution. Your friend was dumb for dressing in a way that was not appropriate for the situation.
2. It's good that he doesn't intend to sue because he has no case.
Just bc you have something flashy doesn't mean it's appropriate for the office. If I came into an inheritance this afternoon and bought a Ferrari, I sure as hell wouldn't drive it to work. In fact, none of my coworkers would know about it.

+1 to all this. Assuming this story is actually for real, your friend is a moron.
post #33 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post

And this is why contract-at-will employment regimes are so problematic in the real world, where labor markets notoriously aren't free and fair. For the employer, it's heads I win, tails you lose.

Well, in the real world using employment-at-will is like bringing a proverbial knife to the gunfight. I am a member of the easiest class to fire so I certainly see your point though.
post #34 of 160
Reading this, I'm tempting the idea of applying for a greeter position at the Wal-Mart just so I can be interviewed wearing an Armani suit. wink.gif
post #35 of 160
The reality of business is that image is very important. Over-dressing is sometimes just as negative as under-dressing. The non-verbal statements one makes is a far more powerful message than what one says verbally; clothing is part of this non-verbal communication. Wearing overly flashy or expensive clothing can lead to a feeling of distrust. If you would like an example of this, you don't have to look any further than used car salesmen and preachers.
post #36 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

Not quite an apples to apples example, but I'll share an instance of this coming into play:
My father worked for a very, very large company for over 30 years and worked his way to senior management. On one occasion he was in Las Vegas entertaining clients when one of his employees (a junior level guy making less than $50,000 a year) won big (over $35,000). Now my father was not overly upset with the gambles he took and was actually a bit impressed he was able to secure that much money after starting with only a few hundred bucks. However, when the man walked away from the table he walked directly to a Rolex boutique where he spent all of his winnings on a gaudy Rolex.
My father was immediately furious with the man and pulled him aside. The guy saw nothing wrong with spending $35,000 on a watch when he was only making $50,000 a year. That kind of decision making reflects incredibly poorly on one's concept of money and ability to make good decisions. It's enough of a gamble that he played up to $35,000, but the fact that he frivolously and immediately spent it all does not bode well for what he will do with the company's money or what image he will reflect on the company when he meets with Clients and is wearing a diamond Presidential.
Again, not apples to apples, but it needs to be known that what you do with your money and how you allocate discretionary income, as well as the image you are trying to portray, says a lot about who you are and how you think.

I like this post
post #37 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by div25sec9 View Post

The reality of business is that image is very important. Over-dressing is sometimes just as negative as under-dressing. The non-verbal statements one makes is a far more powerful message than what one says verbally; clothing is part of this non-verbal communication. Wearing overly flashy or expensive clothing can lead to a feeling of distrust. If you would like an example of this, you don't have to look any further than used car salesmen and preachers.

Your point is very valuable, but the precent story the friend is meant to be a top achiever...... his image is surely good?
I have a feeling that if he hasn't been told off until his new boss, and if such thing happened, surely he would have some contact detail of his client and possible help out of his job, and his dressing was probably approved by the industry but not his insecure boss

Overall, I would not to work in a company who reacts to things like this, it just doesn't sound innovative, interesting and challenging company for me.....
post #38 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young Gentleman View Post

A friend of mine recently got fired even though his performance at work was just fine. He was the best dressed person at the office, in his imposing bespoke double breasted or three piece suits, always wearing a pocket square, a seven fold tie and bespoke shirts from T&A as well as some highly polished Lobb brogues. In fact at meetings clients often confused him with the head of the company and thought that his Boss was merely his assistant.

Nevertheless his performance was excellent and he signed more contracts than any other employee.

A few weeks ago his Boss asked him to come see him, made him sit down and told him that he didn't appreciate the way he dressed and that it was making him personally feel uncomfortable.

Since he was within the rules of the company dress code my friend ignored his Boss' request to dress down and two weeks later he received a letter telling him that he was getting fired, no clear reason was mentioned.


Now do you think this is fair? Should someone not be able to dress as they please because it hurts some guy's ego?

The real reason why he got fired. The dressing thing was just the boss trying to make his life difficult.
post #39 of 160
This story reeks of embellishment or outright bullshit.

And if it's true, OP's friend is not smart.
post #40 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

I would cut their salaries.

What's really annoying are the guys in bespoke clothes who work for no salary at all, or a nominal salary of $1/year.
post #41 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

What's really annoying are the guys in bespoke clothes who work for no salary at all, or a nominal salary of $1/year.

Haha i was about to say something along these lines. While i do agree that the OP's friend should have listened and maybe stopped the DB's or lose the waistcoat i dont see a problem with people wearing expensive clothes in the work place. If it was just a bespoke navy blue/charcoal/grey/any of the previous with pinstripes i dont see a problem. I mean lets face it, like the OP said his friend came from money so this is what he is used too, he should not have to run to jos. a. bank and waste money just to try and fit in.
post #42 of 160
1. I agree with most of the posts on the thread
2. if your clients/customers are noticing your dress, and confuse your boss with your assistant, there is a problem
3. one of my reports has about 30K worth of watches, gifts from his inlaws. he gets really pissed off that he keeps coming in and telling people how broke he is and how he needs a raise and he can't pay for his kids school, and they all point to his watches. he exagurates his poverty, but the watches make his position weak, and he doesn't get it.
post #43 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

What's really annoying are the guys in bespoke clothes who work for no salary at all, or a nominal salary of $1/year.

And tons of stock and stock options in the corporation, taxed at rates way below their minions' salaries. Poor blighters.

I've heard reports of well-to-do elderly people who live off the interest and dividends of their investments, who pay $0 in federal taxes. All perfectly legal, and without any dodges like offshore. Meanwhile, families with two medium salaries and two kids get hammered. While I'm all in favor of making things easier for the elderly, something seems worrying about that.
post #44 of 160
post #45 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

What's really annoying are the guys in bespoke clothes who work for no salary at all, or a nominal salary of $1/year.

376
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › He got fired because he was better dressed than the Boss?