or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › I don't get it, why buy a €5000 Brioni or Kiton suit when you can go bespoke?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

I don't get it, why buy a €5000 Brioni or Kiton suit when you can go bespoke? - Page 12

post #166 of 250

He might not be, but his portrayals on film are!

 

The fascination with James Bond is that he is a fictional character, crafted to be what every man 'aspires' to be. From his Aston, to his wristwatches, and his way with women. He also gets to be the hero which every man daydreams inside his head while typing reports in his office/cubicle/circus trailer/etc.

 

But I do agree with others. The fascination with a brand should be because of what the product brings to the table. I wouldn't mind having a Brioni suit. But I would never get one if I can get a bespoke suit for the same price. Why? Because no matter how nice the Brioni is made to fit, the bespoke was made to fit ME, down to the last deformity. 

 

Still, to each his own:)

post #167 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarglider unrelism View Post

However......personally I would never put Armani in the same sentence, let alone league, as Brioni or Zegna.
What think you?
Respectfully,
Mike

Wait, you just did it.
post #168 of 250

Kiton and the like are mostly for people who think they can buy class or people who don't spend any time dwelling on their attire. The same way they buy cars, for example: "I need a car" -> "must convey status" -> "S class Benz".

post #169 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Why so surprising? A lot of guys could do with a good personal stylist, or at least, someone who looks at them critically, and say "Try something else." People ask for that type of advice here all of the time. The House of Rubinacci essentially started that way. When you go into a good retailer, you are essentially relying on the buyer's tastes.
I'm sure that Brioni pays a pretty penny for product placement though.

What I am trying to say is that a lot of stylists, well, don't have good style, don't know style or anything about tailoring. I mean look at advertisements. They don't know about fit, they aren't tailors, why look at an actor in film? The only films where people actually look good in their clothes are old films, because in those days they dressed themselves and tailors made their clothes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Has anybody mentioned that James Bond is not a real person?

Exactly my point.
post #170 of 250

I believe it's a mixture of both. 

 

Like I said, James Bond might not be real. But when building the character the train of thought goes:

 

What would the sleekest, classy guy in the world drive? And they answer it with Aston Martin.


Same goes for everything else. However, I agree with what your point is trying to express. Dress in what you think looks good. And don't break the bank on a suit you think will make you look like James Bond. There are thousands of alternatives that can give you the same result. i.e. the bespoke suit. 

 

And you're right about the old films. Frank Sinatra favored the tie in a time where bow ties were more mainstream. He is one of the big names responsible for making it so popular. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


What I am trying to say is that a lot of stylists, well, don't have good style, don't know style or anything about tailoring. I mean look at advertisements. They don't know about tailoring, they don't know about fit, why look at an actor in film. The only films where people actually look good in their clothes are old films, because in those days they dressed themselves and tailors made their clothes.
Exactly my point.


 

post #171 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Has anybody mentioned that James Bond is not a real person?

I assure you that he is real. I have seen many documentaries of his exploits over the years. He changes his appearance now and then but that is a must in his line of work.
post #172 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatano View Post

I believe it's a mixture of both. 

Like I said, James Bond might not be real. But when building the character the train of thought goes:

What would the sleekest, classy guy in the world drive? And they answer it with Aston Martin.


Same goes for everything else. However, I agree with what your point is trying to express. Dress in what you think looks good. And don't break the bank on a suit you think will make you look like James Bond. There are thousands of alternatives that can give you the same result. i.e. the bespoke suit. 

And you're right about the old films. Frank Sinatra favored the tie in a time where bow ties were more mainstream. He is one of the big names responsible for making it so popular. 




That's not really what I was trying to express. It wasn't so much a comment on the OP, just a comment on people bringing up characters in movies like they are some sort of authority on clothing, when they are anything but. They are just a product of the media and whatever brand wants to throw money at a film. Whoever wins is at the mercy of some "fashionista" who thinks they know about coherent combinations and proper fit.
post #173 of 250
Bespoke has its own hazards. It is also rarely appreciated for its true value.

When you buy bespoke, you are investing in a professional relationship. Woe if it turns out your tailor is less than honest. Ambrosi is a good example. They can cut a fine pair of trousers, but they don't know how to run a scaled-up business. At the end, the client gets screwed and would have arguably been better off going to the mall. Also, even if you are lucky enough to engage a responsive, reliable tailor, you will find that it takes a lot of effort and time to realize the greatest potential that bespoke offers. Most people accustomed to dropping by the store and walking out with something in a shopping bag are not prepared or willing to be so involved. Talk to anybody on the forum who regularly orders bespoke clothes. Each and every one will have several hair-pulling stories. For bespoke to be worthwhile, you have to really, really love clothes and the art of dressing, or not really care if you get the optimal results (i.e. have lots of money to spare).
post #174 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young Gentleman View Post

Can anyone explain this to me? Why do some people buy Kiton or Brioni suits when they could have one, maybe two bespoke suits made for the same price at one of the world's best tailors?
I prefer to go the bespoke route. I've done so for some 35 years now. That said there are those who don't want the hassle or wait. They want it, and they want it now. That seems to be the direction of the world among those with large disposable incomes.
post #175 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

What I am trying to say is that a lot of stylists, well, don't have good style, don't know style or anything about tailoring. I mean look at advertisements. They don't know about fit, they aren't tailors, why look at an actor in film? The only films where people actually look good in their clothes are old films, because in those days they dressed themselves and tailors made their clothes.

I know a lot of stylists, and while not all of them are great, many of them have a wealth of knowledge about style, fashion history, tailoring, etc... When they style a film or television series, they are often trying to get a specific look and feel. You think that the wardrobe for "Boardwalk Empire" happened by mistake? You think that the clothing choices in Drive were just sort of thrown together? Just because you happen to personally like a specific look doesn't mean that the stylist doesn't know what they are doing. Just sayin'.
post #176 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Each and every one will have several hair-pulling stories.

Better not ask me then.
post #177 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I know a lot of stylists, and while not all of them are great, many of them have a wealth of knowledge about style, fashion history, tailoring, etc... When they style a film or television series, they are often trying to get a specific look and feel. You think that the wardrobe for "Boardwalk Empire" happened by mistake? You think that the clothing choices in Drive were just sort of thrown together? Just because you happen to personally like a specific look doesn't mean that the stylist doesn't know what they are doing. Just sayin'.

I hear you. There are some that are good, but I still think it is dumb to tie fictional characters to a brand as if a fictious person had some sort of reasoning and say in the matter. Boardwalk Empire is a period piece that is different.
post #178 of 250
In
post #179 of 250
I have always thought it humorous that British agent 007 does not rock an English suit. He can surely make something from Huntsman, Richard James, or Sexton work for him...
post #180 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Talk to anybody on the forum who regularly orders bespoke clothes. Each and every one will have several hair-pulling stories.
I'm recalling the time I ordered a suit of the 'house cloth' in the lovat colorway ... then at the fitting discovered it had been made up in tan/biscuit.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › I don't get it, why buy a €5000 Brioni or Kiton suit when you can go bespoke?