or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › To those who attended 'mediocre' universities...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

To those who attended 'mediocre' universities... - Page 5

post #61 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by wj4 View Post

Lord B:
I know nothing of you, except I read your posts on several occasions in this sub section. You've always gave off an impression of a very educated individual. Thanks for your input.
I didn't quote your latter post, but I agree. Throughout high school, my GPA was always around 3.2-4.0 and I didn't have to work for it much. When I have my kids, I would definitely have them tutored, learn a 2nd language, etc.
Even after I got my BS, I felt that my writing skill was mediocre at best, I mean I did graduate in a science field and we don't write stuff! Haha. The time and effort I put into the GRE and GMAT helped out in more ways than I thought. Going beyond the exams themselves, I was taught to be a better writer, although I'm always trying to improve.
I used to be a big car hobbyist, well still am but to a lesser extent. I always used this analogy: Having a degree from a high ranking school makes you look impressive and may intimidate others, sort of like a Ferrari would at a stop light filled with regular cars.
BTW I'm surprised at how many replies this thread got. It seems that most who are posting now are interested in voicing their opinion, and not just post for posting.

Thanks for the kind words. But I imagine your opinion of me would change rather quickly if you ever venture into the NHL Season thread. That thing gets pretty ugly!icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #62 of 71
Thread Starter 
^The only sport I follow is basketball, primary the NBA, haha.
post #63 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur PE View Post

the top 1% is 380k/year/household (2010) hardly billionaires
in fact 1 out of 100 can do it, America is a very affluent country
5% 160k
10% 114k
25% 67k

100k is a good living for 1 wage earner
it's not how much, but what you do with it

the gap is getting wider, with fewer and more concentrated wealth at the top, and more and more at the bottom, with the middle shrinking...but that is the way capitalism works, a redistribution of the wealth/resources upwards...that is the motivation to be at the top, dog eat dog

I'm curious to see where this data came from? Not that I'm doubting you, but this looks very interesting.

America is a very affluent country indeed. Things such as Starbucks coffee and even say nice cell phones ie BlackBerry, iPhone, etc, are not accessible to the "common man" in less developed countries with a triangle shaped economy.
post #64 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by newinny View Post

There's no end to this line of thinking.
If you went to the best undergraduate school then there are people who went to better graduate schools. If you went to the best graduate school then there are people who are smarter, richer, or better looking than you.
I was talking to an MIT PhD student recently who was in awe of the intelligence of the PhD students from the econ department. I was amazed that this person (who could arguably be one of the top 5% most intelligent grad students in the world) was jealous of students in the 1% category.

Yes. Because in his (or her) heart of hearts he knew that it was less likely that he'd win a Nobel Prize.
post #65 of 71
The tenor of this thread is almost entirely about career advancement and earnings
and it's relationship to the selectivity of the college and/or university from which one
graduates. I have degrees from the very top tier of American higher education: Cornell
and the U of Chicago. My wife has comparable credentials. I also taught briefly in
several mid level institutions and after college served in the State Dept.. My impression is
that the main advantage of attending highly selective schools is one's fellow students
and an atmosphere that encourages rigorous learning. The intellectual atmosphere
at Cornell when I attended was in a different category from what I witnessed from
friends of mine who were enrolled in the local public university, which was fairly selective.
Some of this was attributable to class size. It was also due to somewhat lower standards.
Don't get me wrong, I partied plenty as an undergrad- the drinking age for all alcohol was
18 at the time. Nevertheless, I probably learned as much from my classmates as I did
from our distinguished faculty.
post #66 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

My impression is that the main advantage of attending highly selective schools is one's fellow students and an atmosphere that encourages rigorous learning.

I can agree that it gives a different atmosphere, but not necessarily in terms of learning. After attending my grad school (Ivy), I realized how "unsophisticated" my undergrad school (UC) was. In general, the students are more cultured and well rounded at the better school. I can talk about subjects other than my major without getting blank stares or people questioning why I am interested in things outside of my field of study.
post #67 of 71
But perhaps it has to do with the fact that in grad school, people are grown up now and not as naive?

Unsophisticated or just do not care? I think there is a fine line between the two during undergrad
post #68 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

But perhaps it has to do with the fact that in grad school, people are grown up now and not as naive?
Unsophisticated or just do not care? I think there is a fine line between the two during undergrad

I am comparing the undergrads at my undergrad school to the undergrads at my grad school. I always talk to them since I taught 2 lab sessions so I would ask them what their plans are after graduation or what their interests are. They are definitely a more sophisticated crowd. For example, most of these students can hold a conversation about current events/issues (engineering majors) while the ones at my undergrad didn't even know what The Economist is....
post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by EMY View Post

I can agree that it gives a different atmosphere, but not necessarily in terms of learning. After attending my grad school (Ivy), I realized how "unsophisticated" my undergrad school (UC) was. In general, the students are more cultured and well rounded at the better school. I can talk about subjects other than my major without getting blank stares or people questioning why I am interested in things outside of my field of study.

i think that really depends on the UC though...

UCR/UCM are WORLDS different than UCB/UCLA...
post #70 of 71

National Endowment for the Arts has been doing a study every 10 years for a few cycles


I'm in the middle of this http://www.upress.pitt.edu/BookDetails.aspx?bookId=36095

just finished the Jobs bio, pretty good, I knew nothing about his or apple histories

I'm thinking about re-reading 'on the road' next, read it 40 years ago as a kid

Quote:
Originally Posted by wj4 View Post


I'm curious to see where this data came from? Not that I'm doubting you, but this looks very interesting.
America is a very affluent country indeed. Things such as Starbucks coffee and even say nice cell phones ie BlackBerry, iPhone, etc, are not accessible to the "common man" in less developed countries with a triangle shaped economy.


 


Edited by Arthur PE - 3/10/12 at 6:11pm
post #71 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post


What bugs me is seeing kids who attend decent schools holding it over kids who attend slightly inferior schools when overall outcomes for both students in terms of career opportunities and salary are similar. I see this a lot with UC/CSU kids.

What's the fun in studying Sociology at Berkeley or UCLA if you can't lord it over those lowly Davis or Santa Cruz kids? confused.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › To those who attended 'mediocre' universities...