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To those who attended 'mediocre' universities... - Page 3

post #31 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by EMY View Post

okay I hear this time and time again and I don't doubt that it is extremely beneficial, but for someone like me (MS good school, bad grades) how much would it help? I can't even get an interview since applications always ask me for my GPA and it sucks. I feel like I would have been in better shape with just my BS than with my BS and lousy GPA MS.

You ask your network (who I assume want you to succeed if only so that you can help them out later if need be) to get you interviews.
post #32 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by newinny View Post

There's no end to this line of thinking.
If you went to the best undergraduate school then there are people who went to better graduate schools. If you went to the best graduate school then there are people who are smarter, richer, or better looking than you.
I was talking to an MIT PhD student recently who was in awe of the intelligence of the PhD students from the econ department. I was amazed that this person (who could arguably be one of the top 5% most intelligent grad students in the world) was jealous of students in the 1% category.

No matter how much you make, someone thinks you're rich and someone thinks you're poor. It's cliched as hell, but the race really is with yourself.
post #33 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

OSHA/EPA I learned during my 3rd year in my undergraduate business degree - it was actually a 5 week condensed course taught by the supposedly hardest bus. admin professor at the school. Many hated him, few appreciated him as I did. Many could not take the BS and extra reading material plus writing papers every week. Students thought 5+ or 10+ pages were a lot of work whereas I considered it minor. The saddest thing is that no one reads and so when it comes to writing papers or articulating your thoughts whether it be in writing or speech, it become a very taunting task. Having graduated now, I can see myself falling into the latter category. Had a friend graduate before me and he said it was so hard picking back up a book. Didn't believe him then, now I do
I am by no means knocking at what you are doing wj4 but what is taught in an MBA program is pretty relative to many undergraduate bus. admin degrees nowadays. But that is not really the point you are making, rather 1) Timeliness: Now is a good time for you whereas later down the road, too many priorities will takeaway from your studies and 2) You have an intrinsic value to the degree and the larger experience of the MBA program
SUFU, in a specific section, has a thread "dedicated" to late teens to early 30 year old's randomly posting about what is happening w/ their life whether it be academic or career wise, which i think your post fits in perfectly. Aside from that relation, I guess if you are truly looking for real world experiences and exchanges, than this is definitely the right place to share..
FWIW, you and I you and everyone here are not so different in our aspirations and experiences. The only point that really sticks out from your personal anecdote is that you used your network to its full potential, which if you read my post, I have not made use of. And echoing what these types of threads usually end up illustrating is, network and you'll be fine.
Now I know how you afford all those TOJ's
175x400px-LM-9afa816e_160x160.jpg
Most of my purchases are coming out of my own pocket, money here and there. I actually graduated with about 27k in debt, but at a ~ 4% IR, I am not really exaggerating this. Free money from the government
BTW...
What exactly are you using your MBA to concentrate in? I gather from your work experience and interests, it is quite a wide breath of fields. IF anything it just sounds like you want to get into general management, which I guess is why an MBA would be important. I ask because I also really enjoyed my ethics class, as mentioned above, and at one point thought about getting into business law and one day become a board member to care for compliance, etc.

I may switch fields after I get my MBA. MBA, second to none, is probably the most beneficial master's degree out there since it is so broad. One of my company's managers is coming back to school because in order to move up to be a director, they want her to have an business degree. If I do stay in this field, I will move into consulting later on, which the degree will help me I believe if I should open up a firm.

At my current employer, now a clinical lab setting, many people have multiple degrees and it feels great to work with a group like this.

Throughout my short professional career, I've come to the conclusion that aside from a few occupations such as doctors, and lawyers, many jobs can be learned on the spot.

I agree that an MBA has lost its ooohs and wows. Back in the 70s, only a very small population had them. Nowadays, especially with online degrees, they're common.

ToJs were just the beginning, dude. Since I joined this forum, I could've bought a new fully loaded Accord with the money I spent so far, haha.
post #34 of 71
It all depends, I have a cousin who got a JD from Harvard yet is the most incompetent lazy person I know who won't work. I still don't understand how Harvard could have picked her unless she had other people get the grades for her. I've met folks from Stanford who are very intelligent and motivated. One of my previous bosses graduated from a mediocre university but worked his way up to become partner of his firm. A person's character is more important than the degree one obtains.
post #35 of 71
I went to a top tier school that people not familiar with the top schools usually assume is some mediocre state school (since it is not like it even has some big sports team they have heard of). I can't tell whether or not this is good or bad...the people at my firm doing the hiring definitely know it is good since we still have some strong ties to it...but other people in other parts of the country have no idea and I'm not convinced that I am any worse off as a result.

That probably doesn't help you...but I figured I would just throw it out there. Also, at the entry level, we certainly do hire people from non-top schools. At the high level, its pretty hard to find someone without a tie to a top tier school though...but those who don't usually worked their way up in the industry (i.e. nobody transfers in at the high level from a mediocre school but they are fine bringing up people who show talent no matter what their background is).

Quote:
Originally Posted by EMY View Post

okay I hear this time and time again and I don't doubt that it is extremely beneficial, but for someone like me (MS good school, bad grades) how much would it help? I can't even get an interview since applications always ask me for my GPA and it sucks. I feel like I would have been in better shape with just my BS than with my BS and lousy GPA MS.

You are the prime candidate for "networking" since it would help you to have an advocate on the inside who doesn't care about your GPA. Of course I hate that term since it recalls the idea of "networking events" where a bunch of kids would hound people with resumes like it was some sort of trading floor where the person to yell the loudest and ask the most inane questions gets the job. I haven't done much of this so I don't really speak from experience but the better option is to do some more informational meetings. Offer to buy an alumni in your industry coffee or lunch and talk with them about the field. Don't straight out ask them for a job--it can be made clear that you are looking and they will understand this but in the the first 15 minutes they know you, they aren't going to stick their neck out for you. Instead follow up with an email or something to keep in contact. Maybe ask for their advice on some other positions you are applying to, let them have a resume and when a position opens up maybe they will think of you.
post #36 of 71

Not in the slightest. Last year I had a housemate with two MAs (LSE and USC) completing his third with me and another with a lit degree from Oxford. I was also getting as good as or better grades than my classmates, a lot of whom went to better schools. and I could hold my own in any conversation about current affairs, culture etc with the aforementioned housemates. Hell, the Oxford lit grad didn't even know who Goethe was! Pretty much impossible to feel intimidated by such people. My brother's girlfriend was accepted to read Physics at Oxford and you'd never guess in a million years.

It's people with more experience but the same age that I'm intimidated by.

My first uni was mid-ranked and my grad school top 20. If I wanted to do a PhD at a top 5 I'm pretty sure I could. I just wish I had similar confidence outside academia, since I don't really care for research!

 

post #37 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 951socal View Post

I went to a state school (CSU) but i didn't have alot of money
a couple of my friends were legacys of some higher end schools (not ivy league ofcourse, just UCLA or USD and chapman)

I think you undervalue your degree in relation to your friends. Depending on which CSU you went to; there are probably at least a handful that are better than USD or Chapman anyway.

Though UCLA is basically a low ivy on the West Coast. There's literally only a handful schools within 500 miles regarded better: Stanford, Cal, Pomona College,HarveyMudd/Cal Tech in technical fields... maybe Claremont McK.
post #38 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConcernedParent View Post

I think you undervalue your degree in relation to your friends. Depending on which CSU you went to; there are probably at least a handful that are better than USD or Chapman anyway.
Though UCLA is basically a low ivy on the West Coast. There's literally only a handful schools within 500 miles regarded better: Stanford, Cal, Pomona College,HarveyMudd/Cal Tech in technical fields... maybe Claremont McK.

It was no cake walk for me. I've studied my butt off in several courses, one example that came to mind were the Organic Chem classes where 55% was a solid C and half the class would fail the first time around. But it was more of a money issue than anything. I went to a local Cal State so I wouldn't have to spend money on rent. I didn't have a 'real college' experience, per se

I just wanted others' inputs on here as well. I only know a handful of folks who got degrees from such pretigious schools, and it still impresses me. They would probably throw away my application so fast when they saw my SAT score, haha.

I think education is a wonderful thing and if I came from a super wealthy family, I may become a lifetime student. Conversely, I know there are affluent parents who spend tons of money for their kids to pursue the best education money can buy, but the kids are not that motivated, to say the least.

I know a guy, who is a close friend of a close friend, who got a business degree from UCI. He works at a firm in Beverly Hills. I think he started out at $50k fresh out of college. That was pretty good. Fast forward the story...I didn't talk to him for about 3 years, I ran into him at a mall and talked for a bit. The dude is still at the same place making the same salary. I would've left for a better job, but he is not that really motivated because the money is basically play money. He already got a nice 2 bedroom condo and 2 cars upon graduation...the stuff that most struggle out of college for a good decade or two to acquire.
post #39 of 71
USD and Chapman are crap schools, imo.

I've read that grades at CSU are extremely tough because there is no curve...but since you mention that 55% is a solid C I am assuming it was curved.
post #40 of 71
I went to a middling state school and I've always felt good about my education. I did well and really enjoyed it and my professional life hasn't suffered at all from it. The business world is very much interested in what you can DO for a business (generate revenue, improve processes, etc.) not where you studied ten years ago. If you can deliver results, people will rarely care.

Your education is only a part of you. You should never feel inferior or superior to anyone just because of it.
post #41 of 71
I turned down Princeton for Virginia Tech to minimize my college loans. I had an unfortunate situation where my parents made just enough money to minimize the amount of financial aid available to me, but not enough to help me pay for college. I graduated VT owning only $20,000, which is probably about 1/10th of what I would have owed attending Princeton.

That said, turning down Princeton to go to Virginia Tech is one of my biggest regrets in my life. Going back, I absolutely made the wrong decision.

Disclaimer: I'm fully aware that had I gone to Princeton, I wouldn't have had to pay the full cost as I would have been eligible for some financial aid. But, I would have owed significantly more than by attending VT.
post #42 of 71
You turned down P-ton? Honestly, my degree from Princeton Law has opened a lot of doors.
post #43 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKJTG View Post

I turned down Princeton for Virginia Tech to minimize my college loans. I had an unfortunate situation where my parents made just enough money to minimize the amount of financial aid available to me, but not enough to help me pay for college. I graduated VT owning only $20,000, which is probably about 1/10th of what I would have owed attending Princeton.
That said, turning down Princeton to go to Virginia Tech is one of my biggest regrets in my life. Going back, I absolutely made the wrong decision.
Disclaimer: I'm fully aware that had I gone to Princeton, I wouldn't have had to pay the full cost as I would have been eligible for some financial aid. But, I would have owed significantly more than by attending VT.

Princeton, along with a handful of other schools, is as close to a golden ticket as you can get. I would have a tough time turning that down.

What bugs me is seeing kids who attend decent schools holding it over kids who attend slightly inferior schools when overall outcomes for both students in terms of career opportunities and salary are similar. I see this a lot with UC/CSU kids.
post #44 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post

You turned down P-ton? Honestly, my degree from Princeton Law has opened a lot of doors.

+1, same with my Princeton MBA.

To the original question, no, never felt intimidated. I went to a prestigious grad school later on and don't think it makes too big a difference except for the network.
post #45 of 71

I don't think it matters much, what will make the difference is not the 'name', but the fact you may recieve a better education if you take advantage of it.  It will open some doors initially, but afterwards you will be judged your (compared to others) on performance, and if you availed yourself of the better education, that's when it will pay off.

 

I've worked with EE's from CMU (top 5 for sure) that were worthless, couldn't find the battery in a tarus

I've worked with EET's from state schools that developed into outstanding engineers

 

it's the man, not the school once you are in the workforce

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