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To those who attended 'mediocre' universities... - Page 2

post #16 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by wj4 View Post

...Do you ever feel intimidated by others who hold degrees from more prestigious schools? Does not having a degree from a top tier school ever hold you back from getting that job or whatever goal you set out for?
I'm a first generation American, actually not even sure if that is a proper description. I immigrated to the U.S. right before middle school. I got my BS and MS from a state university. I'm also currently pursuing another master's from a regular school. I would love to attend a nationally recognized university, but my SAT score was not the highest, and my parents were not affluent. My goal was to obtain the least amount of debt.
I only have a couple of years of professional experience and so far so good. Just want to hear opinions and stories of those with more experience under their belts. Thanks in advance!


Life is not easy for first generation immigrants.

 

Certain industries are much more discriminatory against your degree than others.

post #17 of 71
Thread Starter 
To the gentlemen with serious replies: Thanks a lot!

BlackHood: I wholeheartedly agree with you. Some of the kids in my MBA program are pretty sickening. They still have the undergrad mentality...taking the classes with the easiest teachers and such. I try to make the most of it by visiting my professors and talk about potential career paths and such. I may not be the smartest out of the bunch, but I do my best.

I acknowledge that there's always going to be someone with a bigger brain than yours. I just want the opinions of some of the folks on the site, who may not be first generation, and may be from the middle to upper class, and had the opportunity to attend finer institutions.

I'll be wrapping up the MBA program in December. By then I will be 27 years old. I honestly can't wait to see what life has in store for me in the next several years. biggrin.gif
post #18 of 71
Working in high tech for more than 15 years, the only tech company I've encountered that exclusively recruits from top-tier schools is Google. I've also seen companies that prefer to hire people just like you: young, ambitious, fired with enthusiasm, with a practical degree from a regional school. Another great source for very high quality tech workers is the military, some of the best guys I've worked with got their training that way.

I went to a highly ranked liberal arts college, and from a network perspective it's been pretty useless. Some ludicrous percentage of my co-alumni go into academia, and among those of us who don't, there are quite a few brewers and carpenters. I almost made a career of brewing myself smile.gif
post #19 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

I almost made a career of brewing myself smile.gif

cheers.gif Brewing humans sounds like good way to dispose of a body and then celebrate afterwards.
post #20 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by wj4 View Post

Hi, if you are just posting for the sake of posting, please go elsewhere.
I'm not really insecure, but I just want opinions from others. I post in this sub-forum every now and then and it seems like quite a few people attended very nice schools.
I did applied for a marketing job that stated they want the candidates to hold a bachelor's from a top tier school. I applied anyway and was not surprised when I did not get a call back. That was the only incident I experienced of having degrees from a no name university.
I'm in CA and yes, state universities vary significantly. I didn't go to UCLA or a UC at all. I went to its cheaper counterpart, a Cal State.
I only have two friends who went to better schools, one attended USC and majored in History. The other attended UCLA and majored in a field I can't recall at the moment. It has to do with child learning/developing. Both are working in non-correlating jobs that pay about $10-12/hour, but they don't worry much because their families are pretty darn well off.

Cal Poly SLO has a very good reputation in CA, so it's not like a CSU is total shit.
post #21 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joenobody0 View Post


Cal Poly SLO has a very good reputation in CA, so it's not like a CSU is total shit.


no.

 

but still better than chico state.

post #22 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joenobody0 View Post

Cal Poly SLO has a very good reputation in CA, so it's not like a CSU is total shit.


no.

but still better than chico state.

I can't tell if you're denigrating Cal Poly or CSU in general? I've worked with a number of Cal Poly grads and know a couple of professors there, it's a very solid school.
post #23 of 71
i am young (even though in my head i feel pretty damn old), jobless, and spending money like crazy.

i know what i want in life, but it's only half the battle as knowing how to get there is the real fight.
* * *
is something going to happen soon? hopefully
am i scared? only some days

i am by nature very in tune with a life of solitude. introverted and probably biggest continuing regret is not being able to network properly.
on the upside, because of this i am a very observant individual and when called upon, my skills and learning curve shine out compared to others of my same skill set who do more talking than walking.

or: novice --> intermediate --> expert, i like to think i am between intermediate and an expert (tailing closer to intermediate in my field) compared to similar peers IMO.

i recommend you go read supertrash on sufu wj4 if you want some more down to earth super confessions of peers around your age.

you will be berated by majority of members here, or have a lack of socioeconomic experience/guidance it seems you are seeking.

though I will tell you, depending on your field, a MBA as told by a former student who attended ivy league, is a dying fad. Getting into a field that teaches more the technical skill set needed will be more beneficial (coming from someone in finance)


and i overheard this in the office the other day:
graduated from harvard, law degree from yale, journalism at oxford: currently in NYC working in journalism--so successful: 35/f and single

frown.gif though in the context it was said, it was kind of like "hey you can be successful and all but look at the downside"

in my head though, i wouldn't mind being in that journalist's shoes.
post #24 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post

I dropped out of Cambridge (ranked between 2nd and 4th in the world depending on the author) and went to a decidedly mediocre University a couple of years later.
My experience has been that the university experience is worth exactly what you put in to it; by working hard and using the facilities I got a better education by going to a second rate school. I'm not intimidated by others who went to great universities because while they were desperately trying to concoct cogent arguments about why historical models collapsed in the 80's I was sitting in the library reading the textbooks and actually learning shit instead of coughing it up and spewing it into essays without proper thought.
If you ever want a better illustration of this, watch Matt Deamon in Good Will Hunting.
Edit: Found it:

+1

And OP:
I can relate to your shoes. But it's what you make out of college. I graduated from a state university with no debt and was able to secure a job in a fortune 500 company within a 1 month of job hunting. These are some tips I have:
- Network (get close to those who are in the same field as you)
- Take classes that you're interested in (regardless if they're hard)
- Intern, Intern, and Intern (and make a difference, there's a difference between just doing you job, and accomplishing something)

I had about a handful of internships by the time I graduated and MADE A SIGNIFICANT difference in each of them. While I did have a really high GPA, I feel that it's my internship accomplishments and drive to succeed that really helped me.

With that said, you're turning 27 after you complete your MBA. Did you go straight into your MBA? Most of times getting an MBA is useless if you have no working experience. It doesn't sweeten your resume by much..
post #25 of 71

I went to a top boarding school and one day, in the spring of my senior year, my AP English teacher told the class something I'll never forget.  She said that when we were in college, we should be intimidated by our classmates who hadn't gone to fancy New England boarding schools - not the other way around - because they had got to the same place we had without all of the advantages we had been given.  It was good advice.

 

Anyway, just work hard, be kind, respect everyone, and fear no one (unless they are a graduate student in econ at MIT - good lord, those people really *are* smart). 

post #26 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by plei89 View Post

+1
And OP:
I can relate to your shoes. But it's what you make out of college. I graduated from a state university with no debt and was able to secure a job in a fortune 500 company within a 1 month of job hunting. These are some tips I have:
- Network (get close to those who are in the same field as you)
- Take classes that you're interested in (regardless if they're hard)
- Intern, Intern, and Intern (and make a difference, there's a difference between just doing you job, and accomplishing something)
I had about a handful of internships by the time I graduated and MADE A SIGNIFICANT difference in each of them. While I did have a really high GPA, I feel that it's my internship accomplishments and drive to succeed that really helped me.
With that said, you're turning 27 after you complete your MBA. Did you go straight into your MBA? Most of times getting an MBA is useless if you have no working experience. It doesn't sweeten your resume by much..


Hi.

Here's some background info about me. I started college in Fall of 2003. I didn't get my BS until Spring of 2009. A combination of working part time too much, didn't pay enough attention, harder than expected classes, switching majors, and the university adding more required GE's to their curriculum held me back about 2 years for the BS. I got my MS in Fall of 2010.

Getting a job out of college was no problem at all. I applied for a job, and got hired 2 weeks later. My first professional job, although not the highest, paid about ~$50k/year. I stayed with the company for about 14 months and looked for a job elsewhere. I have about 2 years of professional experience at this point. I'll be close to having 3 years of experience once I get my MBA degree. I have $0 in debt.

I keep a close circle of friends from the program. I also keep in touch with some really great professors, one of them I can wholeheartedly say changed my life.

The reason I chose to do my MBA now is because it would be hard as I move up the rank and the job demands I work weekends, travel, etc. Also, it would be extremely difficult in several years if I had children to take care of.

There are some well off kids with no work experience and I know that they can't relate to some of the stuff the professors talk about, ie ethics/legal. That's probably one of my favorite class because I had a bad employer and now I have a great one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

i am young (even though in my head i feel pretty damn old), jobless, and spending money like crazy.
i know what i want in life, but it's only half the battle as knowing how to get there is the real fight.
* * *
is something going to happen soon? hopefully
am i scared? only some days
i am by nature very in tune with a life of solitude. introverted and probably biggest continuing regret is not being able to network properly.
on the upside, because of this i am a very observant individual and when called upon, my skills and learning curve shine out compared to others of my same skill set who do more talking than walking.
or: novice --> intermediate --> expert, i like to think i am between intermediate and an expert (tailing closer to intermediate in my field) compared to similar peers IMO.
i recommend you go read supertrash on sufu wj4 if you want some more down to earth super confessions of peers around your age.
you will be berated by majority of members here, or have a lack of socioeconomic experience/guidance it seems you are seeking.
though I will tell you, depending on your field, a MBA as told by a former student who attended ivy league, is a dying fad. Getting into a field that teaches more the technical skill set needed will be more beneficial (coming from someone in finance)
and i overheard this in the office the other day:
graduated from harvard, law degree from yale, journalism at oxford: currently in NYC working in journalism--so successful: 35/f and single
frown.gif though in the context it was said, it was kind of like "hey you can be successful and all but look at the downside"
in my head though, i wouldn't mind being in that journalist's shoes.
Dude, you're jobless and you're spending money on clothes? I hope your parents are giving you the money and aren't going in debt because of this crap. I've heard of kids being in debt because of cars. But it was not until I joined this forum that I read kids are in debt because of fashion.

What is this "supertrash" thing. I know of SuFu since my days on Niketalk, but I never joined/visited. I don't have the time to really do my research for lack of better words. Between working/school and trying to hit the gym at least 4 times a week...I have no time for anything else..except SF every now and then of course!

MBA may be a dying field, but I wholeheartedly enjoy the courses. I was smiling since the first lecture of the first class. Educating myself further is worth the money by itself even if I never put this degree to use.

I can easily make a 6 figure income in my field, without the need of pursuing the MBA degree. But enforcements such as OSHA and EPA are non-existing in less developed countries, this is in case I want to pack up one day.

I'm a weird person at my age, bro. Most people my age just do the 9-5, M-F, and hang out on the weekends. I can't really see myself doing that on a regular basis. Even on my breaks, I would pick up books to improve myself in some aspect. Aside from the 2-3 best friends I have, my other friends are 30+ of age and are well off professions.


Sorry for the long read. It's also kinda late so excuse any grammar errors.
post #27 of 71
You are doing better than the average college grad from the past 3 years (or more).

You landed a job out of school fairly quickly, check.
You have maintained professional relationships, check.
You are avoiding the trappings of having a "good job" at a young age and settling for it, check.

Don't fret.
post #28 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

You are doing better than the average college grad from the past 3 years (or more).
You landed a job out of school fairly quickly, check.
You have maintained professional relationships, check.
You are avoiding the trappings of having a "good job" at a young age and settling for it, check.
Don't fret.

Like I stated before, a lot of freshly graduated kids think good jobs will just appear on their laps. This is where I took the advantage. Even for the BS program, we were required to pick up a mandatory internship. Most places were paying $12-15/hour or so. I interned for nothing, but it was for JPL/NASA because of the name. I firmly believed that this helped me get my first gig.

My first job was at an airport, it was about a 60-90 min commute depending on traffic. I was a supervisor. It was great because the dept was relatively new. I get to use what I learn in school and implement ideas. It was not a M-F, 9-5 though. I worked all shifts, from morning to swing to graveyard, as long as my school can be accommodated. There were things I learned that school would never be able to teach me, ie how to interact with employees when they back talk you while giving performance reviews, revising metrics, etc. Especially when some of your workers are gang members, hehe. Most of my classmates would never take this job because it's not a normal job.

If I had a serious relationship, it would surely not last at that point. I would never get too comfy at a job and stay. I started looking for a job that was closer to home after 1 year of working there. I essentially found it and got a decent pay jump.

I guess I'm a person that pushes himself by seeing the glass as half full.

More than anything, I want to be able to provide for myself and parents comfortably when they're older as a thank you.
post #29 of 71
OSHA/EPA I learned during my 3rd year in my undergraduate business degree - it was actually a 5 week condensed course taught by the supposedly hardest bus. admin professor at the school. Many hated him, few appreciated him as I did. Many could not take the BS and extra reading material plus writing papers every week. Students thought 5+ or 10+ pages were a lot of work whereas I considered it minor. The saddest thing is that no one reads and so when it comes to writing papers or articulating your thoughts whether it be in writing or speech, it become a very taunting task. Having graduated now, I can see myself falling into the latter category. Had a friend graduate before me and he said it was so hard picking back up a book. Didn't believe him then, now I do

I am by no means knocking at what you are doing wj4 but what is taught in an MBA program is pretty relative to many undergraduate bus. admin degrees nowadays. But that is not really the point you are making, rather 1) Timeliness: Now is a good time for you whereas later down the road, too many priorities will takeaway from your studies and 2) You have an intrinsic value to the degree and the larger experience of the MBA program

SUFU, in a specific section, has a thread "dedicated" to late teens to early 30 year old's randomly posting about what is happening w/ their life whether it be academic or career wise, which i think your post fits in perfectly. Aside from that relation, I guess if you are truly looking for real world experiences and exchanges, than this is definitely the right place to share..

FWIW, you and I you and everyone here are not so different in our aspirations and experiences. The only point that really sticks out from your personal anecdote is that you used your network to its full potential, which if you read my post, I have not made use of. And echoing what these types of threads usually end up illustrating is, network and you'll be fine.


Now I know how you afford all those TOJ's

175x400px-LM-9afa816e_160x160.jpg


Most of my purchases are coming out of my own pocket, money here and there. I actually graduated with about 27k in debt, but at a ~ 4% IR, I am not really exaggerating this. Free money from the government



BTW...

What exactly are you using your MBA to concentrate in? I gather from your work experience and interests, it is quite a wide breath of fields. IF anything it just sounds like you want to get into general management, which I guess is why an MBA would be important. I ask because I also really enjoyed my ethics class, as mentioned above, and at one point thought about getting into business law and one day become a board member to care for compliance, etc.
post #30 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

network

okay I hear this time and time again and I don't doubt that it is extremely beneficial, but for someone like me (MS good school, bad grades) how much would it help? I can't even get an interview since applications always ask me for my GPA and it sucks. I feel like I would have been in better shape with just my BS than with my BS and lousy GPA MS.
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