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Your thoughts on the Ventess Tux... - Page 3

post #31 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

stupid americans

I'll take their stupid over today's smart any day.
post #32 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

If we are talking about a bespoke jacket, one basic job of your hired crew is to make sure that vents hang closed and round the hip.

Of course, but doesn't the story go that Terrence Young took Connery to his tailor (Sinclair?) to get kitted out for the film?
post #33 of 62
I thought DBs were traditionally ventless. Am I wrong? Is the rule different for tuxes? confused.gif
post #34 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post

Of course, but doesn't the story go that Terrence Young took Connery to his tailor (Sinclair?) to get kitted out for the film?

There's only so much one can do for a Scotsman.
post #35 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

I thought DBs were traditionally ventless. Am I wrong? Is the rule different for tuxes? confused.gif

It would be wise and practical to avoid the word "rule" when talking about jacket vents.
post #36 of 62
Hardy Amies, in 1964, wrote thusly:

"Side Vent: Side vents are short openings at the bottoms of the two side seams of a jacket. They are usually no more than 3 inches long, and on a sports jacket they make it a semi-hacking style. They tend to be out of place on single-breasted lounge suits, but they can be effective on a double-breasted jacket, where a center vent would appear unbalanced."

"Center Vent: The vent is actually a slit in the middle of the back of a riding or hacking jacket designed to allow the skirt of the jacket to spread freely whe you sit astride a horse. It can help the jacket of a suit in much the same way, and in any case it adds a touch of style. For riding, a center vent must start at the waist. In a suit or sports jacket it should be seven or eight inches long."

Enjoy, iGents and iEnglishmen.
post #37 of 62


No word about dinner jackets?  Hmmmmmmm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Hardy Amies, in 1964, wrote thusly:
"Side Vent: Side vents are short openings at the bottoms of the two side seams of a jacket. They are usually no more than 3 inches long, and on a sports jacket they make it a semi-hacking style. They tend to be out of place on single-breasted lounge suits, but they can be effective on a double-breasted jacket, where a center vent would appear unbalanced."
"Center Vent: The vent is actually a slit in the middle of the back of a riding or hacking jacket designed to allow the skirt of the jacket to spread freely whe you sit astride a horse. It can help the jacket of a suit in much the same way, and in any case it adds a touch of style. For riding, a center vent must start at the waist. In a suit or sports jacket it should be seven or eight inches long."
Enjoy, iGents and iEnglishmen.


 

post #38 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by recondite View Post


No word about dinner jackets?  Hmmmmmmm.

smile.gif

Mr Amies, again:

"Dinner Jacket/Suit: By far the most popular form of eveningwear. Basically the cut of a dinner jacket is similar to that of a day suit and will therefore follow the same trends of fashion as regards to length and general style."

I already hear the wind rushing out the teeth of the online masses.
post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

I'll take their stupid over today's smart any day.

+1.
post #40 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post

Of course, but doesn't the story go that Terrence Young took Connery to his tailor (Sinclair?) to get kitted out for the film?

But what does that mean?

Did they want it to fit right? Or did they want it to fit a certain way for the film?

I'm guessing Connery rarely wears makeup in real life. The fact he does something in a movie is worth about what you paid for the ticket.
post #41 of 62


Ha, ha!

 

A well laid ̶t̶r̶a̶p̶  argument. Well done!

 

Funny, there is no remark [yet] about color of jacket, but only length and style, or is there a further opinion we should recognize?

 

It should be no surprise, considering that black tie has been a category of informal dress since its inception. So, what form does  this informal dress code maintain? Any or none?

 

If you factor in Red Sea rig, not even a jacket is required for proper informal attire below white tie or full dress regalia, leaving us with shirt, pants, and shoes together with a small handful of accessories that in themselves, do not adhere to a form or formula since white tie was abandoned for less formal occasions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post


:)
Mr Amies, again:
"Dinner Jacket/Suit: By far the most popular form of eveningwear. Basically the cut of a dinner jacket is similar to that of a day suit and will therefore follow the same trends of fashion as regards to length and general style."
I already hear the wind rushing out the teeth of the online masses.


 

post #42 of 62
Thread Starter 
It appears that many bespoke tailors - when left to their own devices - would still place vents on a DJ, but bow to the clients wishes to remove vents altogether.

Interestingly the Chest Barrie tux in the RTW range is ventless, against the wishes of the gents doing bespoke. It seems faux-correctness has almost entirely overthrown tradition in this instance.
post #43 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Butler View Post

Ditto :bigstar:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewfoot View Post

So if it's a DB then vents and if it's a SB then ventless?
Quote:
Originally Posted by recondite View Post

Who's to argue?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

And, to Vox's dictum, my DJ is DB. Then again, my previous one was also DB and ventless and it never felt uncomfortable.

I am only stating my personal preference.

I will say that the notion of a ventless bespoke jacket looking "sleeker" when standing can only come with the assumption that the vents aren't done well. Otherwise, I don't see how one could tell the difference unless the dude was in full twirl or heading to the floor at the yell of "Gator!"


Purely for the sake of argument as I feel like playing devil's advocate & arguing a point that I don't believe matters IRL... even perfectly lying flat vents are noticeable as being visually different to unvented jacket. Leaving aside the possibility that my own bespoke items don't meet the unattainable nirvana of perfection, just take a photo any of double-vented jacket you feel does meet that criteria from a rear 3/4 angle. You will be able to tell whether the jacket has vents or not. Vents have two layers of fabric at the overlap, so even when lying flat, there is a small difference in height (the thicker the fabric, the greater the difference). Therefore, there is a theoretical visual difference between ventless & vented. In motion, of course, the difference can exaggerate, as your vivid example suggests. It is therefore possible - if indicative of an unhealthy concern with irrelevant trivia - to argue that a ventless DJ is sleeker than a vented one and all other factors being equal, picking the ventless one for that reason.

 

Returning to our earthly plane and away from the angels on pinheads, on a practical level, the choice that matters to 99.99% of DJ-buying individuals (hardly a market brimming over with people in the first place) is not ventless vs vented but good fit vs bad fit, which will override any trivial concern with vents. This is even more so when you consider that any time you're wearing a DJ, the sun at least low in the sky (if not already set in the autumn/winter months) and interior lighting is generally not particularly bright at dinners.

 

(disclaimer for bias: my SB is ventless; the DB is double-vented. Neither is bespoke (SB RTW/DB MTM) though I have other bespoke items. No-one - including myself - will ever notice or care about the differences in vents. In fact, I suspect the vast majority of people barely see the difference between the SB and DB ones, rendering any other more intricate style choice rather moot. Also, I don't dance...).

post #44 of 62
I got a new SB last year-- I ordered ventless, but somehow my tailor forgot and put vents in. I don't know if it was the extra work involved (more than likely) or a legitimate aesthetic issue, but he said that it made more practical sense for a long-ish (i.e., not short) jacket to have vents.

On the other hand, I have a DB DJ from A&S, and it has no vents. No problem.
post #45 of 62
I asked Richard about this once. He said he knew that vents were not strictly proper but he liked them anyway so that's a different answer/explanation.

My own dinner suit has no vents. I think short vents are ok but regular vents on dinner suits seem wrong to me.
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