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DIY Clothing Alterations: Taking in a Dress Shirt - Page 3

post #31 of 37
Thanks guys.

What's the difference between "shoulders too wide" and "arm holes too low". I notice on on good fitting shirts, the upper seam of the sleeves seems to be in line with the outer edge of the shoulders.

Whereas on a big shirt, the sleeves seem to start lower down the arm. The sleeves have fallen off the shoulders cos the shirt body is too big. Is this classified as "shoulders too wide" and "arm holes too low"?
post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sewmany View Post

Thanks guys.

What's the difference between "shoulders too wide" and "arm holes too low". I notice on on good fitting shirts, the upper seam of the sleeves seems to be in line with the outer edge of the shoulders.

Whereas on a big shirt, the sleeves seem to start lower down the arm. The sleeves have fallen off the shoulders cos the shirt body is too big. Is this classified as "shoulders too wide" and "arm holes too low"?
Yes for the shoulders
For the arm holes, look at the seam by your armpit where the shoulder and side seams intersect. I haven't had any problem taking it in around an inch. Never tried raising it more than that, so I can't comment on how it would affect the alteration
post #33 of 37

I have a question about the cuffs, if anyone even still reads this thread:  how do you take in the side seams and end up with cuffs that still fit and are not all bunchy from the lack of sleeve fabric?  Thanks!

post #34 of 37
You can taper the sleeve so it's still the original width at the cuff, or you can remove sleeve material all the way down the seam; or you can fold more material into the pleats at the cuff.
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyleeny View Post

I have a question about the cuffs, if anyone even still reads this thread:  how do you take in the side seams and end up with cuffs that still fit and are not all bunchy from the lack of sleeve fabric?  Thanks!
There should be about 3-4cm of excess fabric at the end of the sleeve from the pleats. So just take in as little fabric as possible from a few inches beforehand
(Just be mindful that you will be taking the shirt.in an additional half an.inch again when you take it in from the wrong side to make your french seam).
Worst comes to worst, if you accidentally take in too much, take in the cuff from the center. Just do it on the wrong side of both pieces, so you have to spread them apart. Then press the seam open (preferably cut the "loop" so it's not like a dart), fold them back.together, and reattach it to the sleeve
post #36 of 37

I have another question about the cuffs: If you only partly detach them, how do you reattach them without having your new stitching overlapping your old?

post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarlet View Post

I have another question about the cuffs: If you only partly detach them, how do you reattach them without having your new stitching overlapping your old?
Overlapping old stitching isn't a problem. Just make sure the colors of the threads are the same, or at least very similar. If the sides are chain stitched, you can actually unravel the threads really easily and use that thread to reattach the cuffs, since it's usually the same thread.
It won't really be noticeable. The stitching won't even match the original anyway, since the stitch length will likely be a little different.
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