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Medical School - Page 7

post #91 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

See, I hear this often. People warning anyone who is considering a career as a physician to realize it's not like on t.v. etc...
But, isn't it that people choose to work the long hour careers? Is there no option for a relatively lighter workload? Surely there are doctors content to make 65,000 dollars a year in some lesser position somewhere, working typical hours?

Yes, anyone can work as much or little as they choose unless you are a salaried employee. Then, you work whatever is agreed upon in your contract. Some of the women I trained with chose to split one full-time, salaried position at a mental health center. They each worked 16 hours a week, had no benefits (use their husbands'), and were paid hourly (around $80-100/hour). Another guy I trained with is now the medical director for three psyc hospitals and probably makes around $600k/year. He works crazy hours, has call 24-7-365 unless on vacation and is still likely to be called if something really bad happens while he's away. He really does nothing but work.

Other specialties will usually function as a group practice. You take call for your group's patients and call fro any hospital where you have privileges. You are paid based on your billing minus the group's shared overhead. A married couple who are both Family Practice docs share call with 2 other practices, but he works full-time and she work 1/2 time now that they have kids. Other married physician couples both work full-time and use nannies to raise their kids.

You can set up your job however you want. You just have to take into account all of the +/- of what you want to do.

Something else to consider is the cost of school. You can go into the military and they own you once you are done, but education is free. You can also find underserved areas for some specialties and the NHSC will pay off a portion of your loans each year you work there (I did this). Some private practices will offer some loan repayment options. Most state schools are $25-30k/year in-state for tuition alone and you it's extremely difficult to work while in school.
post #92 of 109
Going into psychiatry myself. It's a sweet gig.
post #93 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by darnelled View Post

Yes, anyone can work as much or little as they choose unless you are a salaried employee. Then, you work whatever is agreed upon in your contract. Some of the women I trained with chose to split one full-time, salaried position at a mental health center. They each worked 16 hours a week, had no benefits (use their husbands'), and were paid hourly (around $80-100/hour). Another guy I trained with is now the medical director for three psyc hospitals and probably makes around $600k/year. He works crazy hours, has call 24-7-365 unless on vacation and is still likely to be called if something really bad happens while he's away. He really does nothing but work.
Other specialties will usually function as a group practice. You take call for your group's patients and call fro any hospital where you have privileges. You are paid based on your billing minus the group's shared overhead. A married couple who are both Family Practice docs share call with 2 other practices, but he works full-time and she work 1/2 time now that they have kids. Other married physician couples both work full-time and use nannies to raise their kids.
You can set up your job however you want. You just have to take into account all of the +/- of what you want to do.
Something else to consider is the cost of school. You can go into the military and they own you once you are done, but education is free. You can also find underserved areas for some specialties and the NHSC will pay off a portion of your loans each year you work there (I did this). Some private practices will offer some loan repayment options. Most state schools are $25-30k/year in-state for tuition alone and you it's extremely difficult to work while in school.

which underserved area did you work in?
post #94 of 109
I see. Thanks for your responses guys.

I am at the point in the asking and finding out stage to see whether a career change into medicine would suit me.

I would want to work in undeserved communities, and don't care about making 200,000 dollars a year.... I have worked at non-profits, and what I noted is that health and wellness programs are where the big money is going into; don't know how long this trend will last, but given that preventive care and practice is becoming more of a priority for cost saving purposes, I think it should continue.

Still assessing things... taking it easy, don't want information overload.
post #95 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I see. Thanks for your responses guys.
I am at the point in the asking and finding out stage to see whether a career change into medicine would suit me.
I would want to work in undeserved communities, and don't care about making 200,000 dollars a year....

I'm not trying to take away from your motivation by any means, but I would hope there would be equal if not better ways to serve the underprivileged than personally taking on $100k+ in loans that you'll be paying off for years to come.
post #96 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I see. Thanks for your responses guys.
I am at the point in the asking and finding out stage to see whether a career change into medicine would suit me.
I would want to work in undeserved communities, and don't care about making 200,000 dollars a year.... I have worked at non-profits, and what I noted is that health and wellness programs are where the big money is going into; don't know how long this trend will last, but given that preventive care and practice is becoming more of a priority for cost saving purposes, I think it should continue.
Still assessing things... taking it easy, don't want information overload.

Don't do it man.
post #97 of 109

Medical school has been pretty cool so far. My classmates were great and our preclinical years were P/F, so that helped a lot. We finished basic sciences after 1.5 years, so I took Step 1 pretty early relative to the rest of schools, in February. Studying for that was awful and became extremely bitter about having to continuously jump through these hoops, but my outlook cleared up considerably once I was done haha. I ended up doing really well and it feels GREAT to be done when all my other second year friends at other schools are currently studying for it.

 

I really like the medicine approach to patients, but did like shorter procedures a lot in my surgical subspecialty (ENT / ortho) rotations, so still figuring out what fields are for me.

post #98 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr.orange View Post

Good thing I have time to refine my reasons. Any suggestions on how to make a solid personal statement, besides the ones offered?

Honestly, I wouldn't worry too much about the personal statement.  I don't want to sound defeatist but just make it good enough to not hurt you and leave it at that. Embellishment can work a little but interviewers can easily tell how true your statement is if they ask about it.  And not many interviewers will ask.  Alot of people get in trouble trying to make their statement this powerhouse and just end up with something a little too overbearing, which ends up hurting them if anyone reads it.

 

If you have a really compelling story then, by all means, tell it.  And the interviewers will enjoy a refreshing, original take on medicine.  But don't fret too much about it.  Instead spend your time knowing the ins and outs of your application.  Make sure that if you get asked why you volunteered at that tutoring clinic/homeless shelter/park clean-up that you have a good answer and story.  Interviewers love to hear a "true-ish" story about your real experience in life.

 

And it will give you practice for residency, which is what we're all in it for.  Residency interviews are a little different but your personality is what will really sell you to a program.

post #99 of 109
Thread Starter 
I've got Step 1 in just a couple weeks! Can't wait to be done with it!!
post #100 of 109

^^^That's awesome. Hope you kicked its ass!

post #101 of 109
this thread kind of died out but anyone applying for residency this cycle?

i ended up loving surgery so im applying for general surgery. i sent off my apps and am waiting with fingers crossed!!!
post #102 of 109

Applied for internal medicine!

post #103 of 109

Also applying this year. It's radiology for me. 

post #104 of 109

Since we're on StyleForum... is a simple white pocket square too much for interviews?

post #105 of 109
http://www.amazon.com/Communication-Professionalism-Competencies-Guide-Surgeons/dp/0978889010

i went to this ladys talk at a conference and she said for surgery it was.

medicine is more chill so maybe you could pull it off

great question though lol
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