Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › Formula 1 - F1 - Current Season Discussion
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Formula 1 - F1 - Current Season Discussion - Page 134

post #1996 of 2533
Rosberg's 2016 dominance is built on Hamilton's reliability woes and one qualifying error. Also, if memory serves, most of Rosberg's superior starts have come when he starts on the racing line. The Merc clutch is ass, as both drivers will say and Wolff even admits. And Rosberg gets a pass for being unable to race in the pack, but Hamilton doesn't?

I just don't see the decline that you see. Maybe you'll be proved prescient, but...
post #1997 of 2533
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Rosberg's 2016 dominance is built on Hamilton's reliability woes and one qualifying error. Also, if memory serves, most of Rosberg's superior starts have come when he starts on the racing line. The Merc clutch is ass, as both drivers will say and Wolff even admits. And Rosberg gets a pass for being unable to race in the pack, but Hamilton doesn't?

I just don't see the decline that you see. Maybe you'll be proved prescient, but...

With our favorite sports heroes, we often don't notice or face their decline. Regarding the comment about Alonso not racing unless there is something to race for, it does beg the question of decline, and frankly the attitude that he'll coast if the car is not fast... kind of the definition of an asshole.
post #1998 of 2533
I agree with the Alonso remarks. I think we saw the same thing with M. Shumacher too. Without full motivation, they are unable to get out the extra .200~.300 sec. that they used to be able to when they were at full concentration.

Rosberg is not necessarily "winning" the championship, he is just remaining solid while Hamilton is having a ton of problems. In almost every session where Hamilton did not have problems, Hamilton has been faster than Nico. Having said that, I do think Hamilton is making unnecessary mistakes as well, and these mistakes are likely due to his lifestyle changes. Just a little bit less concentration is making the difference between hitting the wall for no reason, locking up multiple times for no reason, and having a clean session.

The race itself was surprisingly boring and I don't think any of us were expecting the whole race without any mistakes!

What about that Raikonnen penalty!? I thought it was unfair and not in the spirit of the rule.
post #1999 of 2533
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post

I think we saw the same thing with M. Shumacher too. Without full motivation, they are unable to get out the extra .200~.300 sec. that they used to be able to when they were at full concentration.

When did you see this in MS? Pre or post retirement?
post #2000 of 2533
Maybe both. Pre-retirement around his last season (if I remember correctly) he started to be out-outqualified by Massa quite frequently, then when he came back against Rosberg I don't think it was all Rosberg being quick, rather Schumacher not showing full motivation since the car was nothing like he expected. In both cases I think Schumacher was losing that little extra because of lack of full concentration/motivation.
post #2001 of 2533
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post

Maybe both. Pre-retirement around his last season (if I remember correctly) he started to be out-outqualified by Massa quite frequently, then when he came back against Rosberg I don't think it was all Rosberg being quick, rather Schumacher not showing full motivation since the car was nothing like he expected. In both cases I think Schumacher was losing that little extra because of lack of full concentration/motivation.

Ya, I can see that. After 7 WDCs it's hard to find new motivation.
post #2002 of 2533
It's not for nothing that I refer to him as The Villain Alonso. I think he's amazing, but I don't like him.

Raikkonen: My understanding is that he crossed the line on the way into the pits. I think that's pretty much the letter and spirit of the rules. Given the undulations of the pit straight and the speed differentials, they wanted to be ensure that following drivers would know for sure that a driver was entering the pits.
post #2003 of 2533
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

With our favorite sports heroes, we often don't notice or face their decline. Regarding the comment about Alonso not racing unless there is something to race for, it does beg the question of decline, and frankly the attitude that he'll coast if the car is not fast... kind of the definition of an asshole.

Speaking of Alonso not giving a shit...

Radio communication For Vettel "I'm losing tyre temperature like crazy, because... I dunno, Alonso is taking a bus tour around Baku."
post #2004 of 2533
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

It's not for nothing that I refer to him as The Villain Alonso. I think he's amazing, but I don't like him.

Raikkonen: My understanding is that he crossed the line on the way into the pits. I think that's pretty much the letter and spirit of the rules. Given the undulations of the pit straight and the speed differentials, they wanted to be ensure that following drivers would know for sure that a driver was entering the pits.

I know what you mean, because they thought it could be dangerous following a car into the pits, or even worse a car leaving the pits crossing the pit line into other cars at full speed on the straight...but it was the first race and everything was speculation...judging from the video, I think Raikkonen was driving normally (just following the slip stream) and the reason for a driver stewart is to judge these situations more fairly:
post #2005 of 2533
Thread Starter 
It does look like he was just slipstreaming, but the rule is the rule.
post #2006 of 2533
Thread Starter 
https://www.jamesallenonf1.com/2016/06/have-your-say-are-the-current-radio-rules-hurting-or-helping-formula-1/

Comments are interesting on this topic.
Quote:
Absolutely helping.

The complexity for sake of complexity is pointless, and it is not the radio that's the problem but that complexity. Drivers should be in full control of cars, and should know how to operate the cars fully without engineers doing live tech support from the garage.

F1 has driver the regulations in this direction and the result is obvious - love it or hate it drivers need to become system operators.

Is this complexity is necessary for the show should actually the real question. I fully understand adjusting for suspension characteristics, RPM limit, shift points, brake balance. But these PUs have resulted in a whole other level of complexity for drivers, and as I noted in the previous point, they are actually proven now to be a safety hazard. Spain crash happens because of what? PU "modes" complexity. These guys are now starting to look foolish. We have 2 F1 WDCs having issues with modes - it's pathetic...

For me, I don't care to hear a monotone engineer telling a guy to press button 3 and move dial 9 to setting 7. If this is a driver's full time job, then they should know the modes. Does anyone really want to listen to tech support calls with the pit? If so, add the Bangladesh accent.
Edited by idfnl - 6/22/16 at 3:45am
post #2007 of 2533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post

I know what you mean, because they thought it could be dangerous following a car into the pits, or even worse a car leaving the pits crossing the pit line into other cars at full speed on the straight...but it was the first race and everything was speculation...judging from the video, I think Raikkonen was driving normally (just following the slip stream) and the reason for a driver stewart is to judge these situations more fairly:

Womp Womp. Why did it only happen to Raikkonen then?
post #2008 of 2533
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

https://www.jamesallenonf1.com/2016/06/have-your-say-are-the-current-radio-rules-hurting-or-helping-formula-1/

Comments are interesting on this topic.
For me, I don't care to hear a monotone engineer telling a guy to press button 3 and move dial 9 to setting 7. If this is a driver's full time job, then they should know the modes. Does anyone really want to listen to tech support calls with the pit? If so, add the Bangladesh accent.

Agreed. Dont know how hearing an engineer tell a driver to change a few knobs on a steering wheel "adds to the show" or is insightful radio messages for the TV audience. I really don't believe drivers need to be able to adjust ALL settings at any particular time. I'm quite certain certain settings can be race/track specific (and disabling others) while others can be automated.
post #2009 of 2533
Raikkonen put all four wheels across the line. Other drivers put only two.

There is nothing entertaining about having engineers tell drivers which settings to change. What is entertaining is having cars at full power racing each other.

As it turns out, Rosberg didn't really demonstrate greater troubleshooting ability, he started with different settings:
Quote:
Hamilton's engine was placed into this faulty mode from the start of the race, while Rosberg found it later on when he switched into the 'wrong' mode of his own volition.

The FIA's stringent restrictions on radio communications, introduced to prevent teams coaching their drivers while on track and to re-enforce existing rules that state the drivers should drive the cars 'alone and unaided', prevented Mercedes telling Hamilton exactly how to correct his engine settings.

But Mercedes was permitted to inform its drivers of a problem with the mode they were in. Mercedes did this as soon as Rosberg switched into the offending setting, so he was able to intuitively correct it - within "just the one lap".

Conversely, Hamilton did not enjoy the benefit of inflicting the loss of power on his own car with an adjustment, so could not simply reverse engineer himself out of trouble.

"Nico was in the more fortunate situation that he did a switch change just before which kind of led him on the right path," added Wolff. "So within half a lap he went back into the right mode.

"Lewis, because he didn't have that right path, it took him a while to figure it out - 12 laps - and this for sure affected his race.
post #2010 of 2533
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

There is nothing entertaining about having engineers tell drivers which settings to change. What is entertaining is having cars at full power racing each other.

I understand, but considering Mercs advantage, reduced power actually enables other cars to race the Merc. Hamilton never had a realistic chance of catching Nico after lap 1, so in a way it was potentially more entertaining for things to be evened out with guys around him.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › Formula 1 - F1 - Current Season Discussion