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Depressing post about my future. AKA me looking for career advice - Page 3

post #31 of 124

Network Network Network

 

Thats what you do. My main job is service industry, my degree, when completed, will be largely useless, and I don't have any particularly unique marketable skills.

 

But I used my service industry job to access networks made up of affluent people in positions of power. I've got six standing job offers for when I graduate (if I decide against grad school) that are more or less guaranteed if I apply, all pay 60+k a year and have benefits, in a number of different fields.

 

I'm not saying this to brag, but to help you.

 

Networking will do more for you than skills, competency or education ever will. You just have to find a door and jam your foot in it til it opens.

post #32 of 124
What is exactly is networking?

It seems to have secured job offers you must have developed some sort of rapport beyond the compulsory etiquette.
post #33 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

What is exactly is networking?
It seems to have secured job offers you must have developed some sort of rapport beyond the compulsory etiquette.


Definitely.

 

Realistically, all my job entailed (before I was made manager) was knowing the product, helping people pick it, and ringing them up.

 

What I've made a point of doing is getting to know my regulars, their businesses, and their interests. I pay close attention to all of my customers, I take the best care of them I can. Little things like letting them stay a bit late, occasionally giving someone a cigar I paid for, stocking the odd bottle of mediocre whisky (my boss doesn't generally maintain a liquor locker). Little things like that impress people a disproportionate amount. Likewise, taking an interest and asking questions in their area of expertise is a great way to make people think you're smarter than you are, and like you more than they should.

 

If one of my more affluent customers just moved, and is looking for a painter, or landscaper, or roofer, I'll recommend another customer or friend who I feel is particularly passionate or professional in that field based on my observations during my interaction with them.

 

There are a number of examples of situations where someone was wanting for something, and I knew someone reliable who could offer that good or service. It is key that both parties are reliable, broker bad deals and you'll be known as a bullshitter. I also make a point of never mentioning or expecting a finders fee.

 

If you do your job well, and it obvious that you're motivated, and keep people indebted to you, they'll likely pull whatever strings they have available  to help you out down the road. If I refuse a 500$ finders fee now, they'll think they owe me a favor when a job opening I'm reasonably close to qualified for comes due in their company. I'll take a shot at a high paying job over a few hundred dollars 9 times out of 10.

 

Basically, make friends, be nice, do what you can for other people, and make sure they're the right people. If you do that, some of them will go out of their way to take care of you too.

post #34 of 124
OP try banking, personal bankers start around 40K + bonus, its more sales than finance but u get to wear nice suits that you enjoy biggrin.gif
post #35 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post

OP try banking, personal bankers start around 40K + bonus, its more sales than finance but u get to wear nice suits that you enjoy biggrin.gif

Unless you work at Chase bank and have to wear black suits with that horrible shade of blue shit underneath. I always say to myself when I walk in the place that if I ever were to work at a commercial bank I wouldn't work at Chase based on thier color scheme alone. Horrible, just horrible.
post #36 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Unless you work at Chase bank and have to wear black suits with that horrible shade of blue shit underneath. I always say to myself when I walk in the place that if I ever were to work at a commercial bank I wouldn't work at Chase based on thier color scheme alone. Horrible, just horrible.

there are no rules about what color suit to wear
post #37 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post

there are no rules about what color suit to wear

Well, they all need help. That horrible shade of blue is the pits.
post #38 of 124
Right now, with a communications degree and little work experience, I'd see if I could get into an entry level marketing position with a software company. There's almost always a shortage of workers in Silicon Valley, but it feels like we're getting back into a hiring frenzy like the early 2000s.

Make use of alumni network, friends, family, whatever connections you have to find out about companies and openings. A LinkedIn account is definitely key. Line up a job before you move if at all possible. Can you afford to be an unpaid intern for three months? That's about the best way possible to get your foot in the door.
post #39 of 124
I have a hard time feeling sympathetic to someone who gets a college degree and THEN suddenly wakes up and realizes that his field of study: pays jack shit / has no jobs available / is not fulfilling / is not in line with his wonderful talents / (insert complaint here).

In fact, all of you precious little delicate flowers piss me off.

Want some advice? Go work in the fucking oil or gas fields in the midwest or the Gulf of Mexico. Or just get off your ass and do something.

Damn! I feel better now.
post #40 of 124
Work at a vinyard.
post #41 of 124
You guys are gross. OP, best of luck.
post #42 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

I have a hard time feeling sympathetic to someone who gets a college degree and THEN suddenly wakes up and realizes that his field of study: pays jack shit / has no jobs available / is not fulfilling / is not in line with his wonderful talents / (insert complaint here).
In fact, all of you precious little delicate flowers piss me off.
Want some advice? Go work in the fucking oil or gas fields in the midwest or the Gulf of Mexico. Or just get off your ass and do something.
Damn! I feel better now.

Those roughnecks make a lot of money. Most of them make like $15-$25 plus an hour depending on position plus OT and work 80-90 hours a week. You're basically working like 2-3 hours a day and the rest of the time is spent waiting around for the equipment to be ready. I've seen a bunch of guys make $10,000-$15,000 a month working at a drilling site.
post #43 of 124
"The only thing more anguishing than being exploited is not being exploited" (Quoting Stig Dagerman from memory)
post #44 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasmade View Post

Those roughnecks make a lot of money. Most of them make like $15-$25 plus an hour depending on position plus OT and work 80-90 hours a week. You're basically working like 2-3 hours a day and the rest of the time is spent waiting around for the equipment to be ready. I've seen a bunch of guys make $10,000-$15,000 a month working at a drilling site.

But it goes further than that. The OP has a degree and hopefully some maturity, intelligence and communication skills. Get out there, get to work and ADVANCE within the organization.

Or he can just sit at home feeling anxious about the situation and ask for advice on a clothing message board.
post #45 of 124
you guys give him some good advice, the past couple of comments are completely useless to him (no offense), he needs something white collar, i doubt a manual oil rig is any solution to him also its dangerous and requires some oil knowledge.
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