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Do you wear an undershirt? Why? - Page 5

Poll Results: Do you wear an undershirt?

 
  • 65% (220)
    Yes
  • 34% (115)
    No
335 Total Votes  
post #61 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by HughJ View Post

The amount of calories burned and thus heat produced by lean muscle is negligible compared to other factors in how much one sweats.
To the OP's topic, thankfully I don't sweat much even in the hottest conditions, so I voted no. I'll pop one on under a sweater once in a while when I'm bumming around the house, but it's never visible.

An athletic person is inherently going to eat more than their sedentary counterparts. The thermogenic effect of food makes a difference in sweating that is anything but negligible.
post #62 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post


Letting an undershirt show is I think widely considered a no-no. The more egregious version has a crewneck undershirt peeking out of an open collared button-up shirt. This is easily solved by wearing a v-neck undershirt. The other problem is having the outline of the undershirt show through your dress shirt. if you're wearing a jacket, the sleeves aren't an issue, and the v-neck of the undershirt often aligns enough with the collar of the dress shirt that it's not too much of an issue. But another way around this is to wear a heather gray, as opposed to a white, undershirt - this reflects less light and is therefore less visible. It comes at some cost to the brightness of the dress shirt.



I find that a crew neck works best when wearing a shirt and tie and a v-neck when unbuttoned.  It might something particular to the v-necks I wear, but I feel the v is very noticeable with a shirt and tie.  Also, +100 on riding the train to commute to work in the Summer and having a drenched shirt if I did not have an undershirt on.  Even true sometimes in the winter on a very crowded train with the heat pumped up and no free hands to take your coat off.

 

post #63 of 222
I find undershirts, and, for that matter, underwear, to be for small-timers. My shirts get thrown out at the end of the day. And my trousers? Well, let's just say that there's a reason Mister Ambrosi hasn't been delivering as promptly as he used to. I keep him in a workshop on the grounds of my palazzo.
post #64 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post

Please elaborate on this 'historical perspective.' It was not until the 1920's that it started becoming acceptable to be in public with just your shirtsleeves, and even GW Bush forbid taking off one's coat in the Oval Office. Here's the historical fact- what we call "dress shirts" were the 'undershirts' throughout the majority of Western history.

This.

I always felt that people erroneously think of suits as "outerwear" as it it were a raincoat or body armor. This of course led to baggy suits, padded shoulders, and 6-button 1998 NBA bespokes.
post #65 of 222
It's an obvious fact that it's plenty possible to wear an undershirt and still wear a well-fitting suit. Wearing an undershirt does not imply wearing a baggy suit.

Svenn, could you elaborate on why it is "tacky", "uncouth" and "better reserved for plumbers" to wear an undershirt for either comfort or with the intention of extending the life of one's dress shirt? I can only assume that either you believe i) wearing undershirts does not extend the life of dress shirts, or ii) it is tacky to try and save money on dress shirts by extending their life. Please clarify which it is you are claiming or if it's some third reason that they are so abhorrent and classless to you.

I continue to marvel at the fact that people have such strong feelings about other people's undergarments.
post #66 of 222
I don't blame people who don't understand the need of an undershirt for moisture control, they just have never experienced living in Houston.

We get 3-4 months straight of 95% humidity days. Summers are brutal enough for any man in a suit to break a sweat walking from the parking lot to the office. It's like New Orleans, only with more air pollution.

Cotton undershirts wick sweat away from the skin and keep your dress shirts from being ruined by perspiration. These are facts. Whether or not they are necessary depends 100% on your local climate.
post #67 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by gort View Post

I prefer to go without them as they just bunch up and are annoying.

The fit of your clothing extends to your underwear. Bunching up means your undershirt doesn't fit. smile.gif
post #68 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post

Please elaborate on this 'historical perspective.' It was not until the 1920's that it started becoming acceptable to be in public with just your shirtsleeves, and even GW Bush forbid taking off one's coat in the Oval Office. Here's the historical fact- what we call "dress shirts" were the 'undershirts' throughout the majority of Western history. Now again, if you sweat excessively or are unusually cold then you're welcome to wear your undershirts, but to have it as a normal part of your business wardrobe for no other reason than to keep your 'dress shirt' tidy is indeed tacky.
On occasion the groupthink sides with the plebs, even when the classy members know better.

Pre-mass manufacturing only the wealthy could afford the luxury of undergarments, so the tradesmen you hold in such contempt would have been the ones without undershirts.

And now that it is acceptable for you to remove your jacket and walk around in your shirtsleeves nobody wants to see your pit stains and back sweat.
post #69 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandres View Post

Cotton undershirts wick sweat away from the skin and keep your dress shirts from being ruined by perspiration. These are facts. Whether or not they are necessary depends 100% on your local climate.


And that is why I wear an undershirt. I wear XS size. I'm usually small, but want the undershirt to be smaller and less excess material.

 

I feel very uncomfortable wearing a nice shirt with nothing under and worrying that I ruined the pits due to perspiration or deodorant.

 

post #70 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

Blocks sweat

+1
post #71 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoNothingGuy View Post


I rarely wear undershirts, but I am more concerned with questioning your theory...
 


I wouldn't go as far as to call it a theory! Perhaps I should have been less general. It's certainly my experience that I sweat less the fitter I am. 

 

post #72 of 222

I only wear V-neck undershirts, and do for a few reasons.

1. I have very oily skin.  Need I say more?

2. Cold nipples at work is a no-go. 

3. V-necks never show under any of my polos or dress shirts at the collar, so its not a big deal from a stylistic standpoint.

4. As stated before, layering in the winter and wicking sweat in the summer.  I've done this for 10+ years and it has kept all my polos, dress shirts, and everything in between from getting sweat-stained in all the normal areas.

 

It's also nice that certain V-necks don't make me itch at the point of the V (Fruit of the Loom mainly).

post #73 of 222
Only in winter
post #74 of 222
Dunno if this has been said in the previous 7-8 pages, cant be arsed to check, but the US and the colder countries are not the world entire.

I now live and work in the US, but but always wore undershirts in India (before I came here) and now find it disgusting that people don't wear them regardless of temperature. That is probably the wrong attitude but it is almost instinctive from my experiences growing up in India.

On that subject, let me tell you something - if you live and work in some of the hotter climes, which I believe is a good part of the globe, then you'll need an undershirt, period.

It doesn't matter that you're an office drone working in air conditioned environments. You'll still need it, trust me.
post #75 of 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandres View Post

I don't blame people who don't understand the need of an undershirt for moisture control, they just have never experienced living in Houston.
We get 3-4 months straight of 95% humidity days. Summers are brutal enough for any man in a suit to break a sweat walking from the parking lot to the office. It's like New Orleans, only with more air pollution.
Cotton undershirts wick sweat away from the skin and keep your dress shirts from being ruined by perspiration. These are facts. Whether or not they are necessary depends 100% on your local climate.

/thread.
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