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Best Bespoke tailoring in New York City - Page 2

post #16 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Raphael is getting on in years and has never been the easiest to work with. Logsdail is a good pick if you want something close to a traditional English suit in the more structured vein. He must be the youngest of the big NYC tailors and seems very pleasant.

While agree that Len's style may work best for the OP, I have always found Raph a real plasure to work with.
post #17 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Raphael is getting on in years and has never been the easiest to work with. Logsdail is a good pick if you want something close to a traditional English suit in the more structured vein. He must be the youngest of the big NYC tailors and seems very pleasant.

While I haven't ordered a suit from Mr. Logsdail, I did have the pleasure of speaking to him a few times. He is very polite and personable and extremely pleasant. I've seen some of his work and it is very good. As a bonus, his coat linings are inserted by hand, something normally found on Italian bespoke, seldom on British, and rarely with American.
post #18 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin E. View Post

While I haven't ordered a suit from Mr. Logsdail, I did have the pleasure of speaking to him a few times. He is very polite and personable and extremely pleasant. I've seen some of his work and it is very good. As a bonus, his coat linings are inserted by hand, something normally found on Italian bespoke, seldom on British, and rarely with American.

I wouldn't say that. We put our linings in by hand I've never thought of it as unusual on a English Bespoke suit. I think it's essential really from a perception point of view because unless the client takes the suit apart along with the buttonholes and the collar it's one of the obvious signifiers of a hand made suit. Of course most of the work goes on inside the suit and creates the shape of the coat but people don't recognize that as easily I think.
Edited by David Reeves - 2/5/12 at 2:06pm
post #19 of 137
To the OP: Forget those actual tailors. Whoever posts continuously about his own business obviously knows a thing or two. There's your answer!
post #20 of 137
nino Corvato \will make you a great suit.
wonderful and very talented man.

different style of suit then logsdail
post #21 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threadhead View Post

To the OP: Forget those actual tailors. Whoever posts continuously about his own business obviously knows a thing or two. There's your answer!

Funny, I thought David was plugging for Logsdail.
post #22 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

nino Corvato \will make you a great suit.
wonderful and very talented man.
different style of suit then logsdail

Carl, Corvato used to make for Brooks back in the day, correct? Does this mean he does more of a sack style? Could be the more American style if that is what the OP is looking for. Also. what about Ercole? I thought they had a lot of fans on here.
post #23 of 137
I was endorsing Len. We don't make suits like A&S.

Len is a good guy and he's all for young people in the business, last week he very kindly offered me the use of his show room to fit my own clients.

Its really shameful and poor form when the older tailors do nothing but complain about the business dying out and then in the next breath they put down the new generation. Sexton still describes his detractors from the 60s as "old cunts" and Richard James was told he'd be bust in a year. Sadly this is usually how it goes but fortunately this isn't Lens outlook. Not that I'm saying he's particularly old:D

I think its great that Len takes up a leadership role in the tailoring community here in NYC and like a responsible leader he nurtures, as well.
Edited by David Reeves - 2/5/12 at 9:05pm
post #24 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

Carl, Corvato used to make for Brooks back in the day, correct? Does this mean he does more of a sack style? Could be the more American style if that is what the OP is looking for. Also. what about Ercole? I thought they had a lot of fans on here.

His reputation is for Ivy-derived clothing, I think.
I've never actually seen his work "in person",
but I've seen many photos of it. He makes David
Letterman's clothes. At a lower price-point for an
American style, SF - affiliate Winston Tailors (Chipp)
might be worth looking at. I am a former client of
theirs- MTM, and liked their interpretation of Ivy
Style. In my case, very natural shoulders, nipped
waist, and two vents. This was in the 80s and 90s.
When I moved to CA and didn't get to New York
much, I stopped using them- with regrets.
post #25 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

I wouldn't say that. We put our linings in by hand I've never thought of it as unusual on a English Bespoke suit. I think it's essential really from a perception point of view because unless the client takes the suit apart along with the buttonholes and the collar it's one of the obvious signifiers of a hand made suit. Of course most of the work goes on inside the suit and creates the shape of the coat but people don't recognize that as easily I think.

I meant entirely by hand. Anyone worth their salt will sew the shoulder, neck, and armhole lining seams by hand, but I meant the long seams as well. I've seen it on Huntsman, Edward Sexton, Maurice Sedwell, Fallan & Harvey, and a few random off-Row tailors, but I've mostly seen machine sewn long seams. Not that a machined lining makes a bad suit.
post #26 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

Carl, Corvato used to make for Brooks back in the day, correct? Does this mean he does more of a sack style? Could be the more American style if that is what the OP is looking for. Also. what about Ercole? I thought they had a lot of fans on here.

I endorse Ercole, Frank is certainly younger than Len. Most people who want to spend $5,000 for a jacket don't want to use Frank because he isn't as expensive despite the handwork and no outsourcing.
post #27 of 137
NIno makes a soft shoulder but it has a nice expression.
some time ago, a customer of mine stopped in. I immediately asked him who made his suit, because
I liked the way the shoulder looked. It was NIno's suit.

Frank's father made me a great suit years ago.
I wore it for at least 10 years.

great people. I have seen a couple of suits on my customers. They have looked good.
post #28 of 137
Not all the guys being discussed are taking on new customers.

To my eye, no one makes a No. 1 anymore. The old Press, Chipp, and Hilton didn't make it, so their current true or false successors dont make it either. It's dead and gone except on eBay.

These choices batted around this thread are all over the field.

Decide on the style first, then ask who does the best job with it.

Then, you have your answer.
post #29 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

These choices batted around this thread are all over the field.

Decide on the style first, then ask who does the best job with it.

Then, you have your answer.

+2
post #30 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

+2

but how do I know if it is really Bespoke?
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