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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 357

post #5341 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

I grew up on hardwood floors as well. Both floors and the staircase of our apartment are hardwood; we never thought to change that because of our daughter.
If I recall, certain people in their early 30's were put off by the idea of someone in his late 20's spending more on a sofa than they would on a couple pairs of bespoke shoes.

There is a difference from changing to rugs from hardwood (insane) and waiting a few years to remove the rugs and get hardwood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Anyone live with soaped floors?

Currently, our floors are oak--lyed and oiled. Considering re-doing them with a soap finish (after lying first).

We never expected the oil to be particularly durable, but it is more painful to touch-up than expected. I suspect, having lived with soaped furniture, that soaped floors might be easier. Even though they may stain more readily than an oil finish, it seems they would also be easier to clean, touch-up, re-soap, etc.

I've not lived with soap, but the stairs to my workshop are oil finished and fairly easy to keep after. Fairly easy being that I wipe them down with a cleaner once in a while. The issue with oil being that it will show water marks which require touch up, other than that I can't recall having touched them up. What trouble are you having?
post #5342 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Numbernine View Post

Ah but I was so much older then
I'm younger than that now

Dylan is a reach even for me...you think these youngsters are going to get that one?

Just dropped off at the house two pallets of stuff like:





Plumbing should start tomorrow.
post #5343 of 5753

post #5344 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Numbernine View Post




Sweet hottub. That must cost a fortune where you live.
post #5345 of 5753

Perks of living where the earth might crack open and explode at any moment

post #5346 of 5753
I just solved all of the TV placement conundrums:

UDs2xLj.gif
post #5347 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


Dylan is a reach even for me...you think these youngsters are going to get that one?

Just dropped off at the house two pallets of stuff like:





Plumbing should start tomorrow.

 

I like Bob Dylan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I just solved all of the TV placement conundrums:

UDs2xLj.gif


This is the stuff I was talking about.  OLED is going to allow completely transparent screens, fold-able screens, etc.  The only thing stopping it today is the manufacturing technology, but seeing LG and others selling 70" TVs means they have it close.  Like I said, two years until they're affordable for enthusiasts.

post #5348 of 5753
Good idea, that might work some day especially for mid-century interiors.
post #5349 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

"Accent wall" is the answer to no question ever.

Why don't you just mount everything to the wall directly and fish the wires up and behind the drywall? Also, there are in-wall speakers you can get and even behind-drywall speakers which are actually invisible. Audio quality will not be the greatest possible, but who cares if you just need decent TV speakers.

 

That's actually exactly what I am doing. I looked into the behind-drywall speaker options and wasn't crazy about them, so I've get a few different sets of in-walls to test. Afterwards, we're going to have a very bare wall, and even as much as we like minimalism, we need some sort of visual interest.

 

I don't like accent walls that are simply painted a different color, but my wife found those examples that would go well with the midcentury aesthetic that's all the rage these days. Alternatively, I thought about building some low-profile panels covered with acoustically transparent fabric to hang on the wall, covering most of the open space and behind the TV.


Edited by flvinny521 - 10/7/16 at 1:57pm
post #5350 of 5753
Bare wall is fine, smooth drywall in itself is something enjoyable, especially for anyone who has taken the time to smooth it themselves.

I hang plenty of artwork, but even so I do not find the need to cover every wall with art.
post #5351 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Bare wall is fine, smooth drywall in itself is something enjoyable, especially for anyone who has taken the time to smooth it themselves.

I hang plenty of artwork, but even so I do not find the need to cover every wall with art.

 

My home has an awful drywall texture. I've complained and complained about it to my wife, but honestly, smoothing the entire house is just not something for which I have the patience. She doesn't think it's annoying enough to actually pay somebody to refinish. Therefore, when we paint the interior in the coming year or so, we'll try to come up with a color and sheen that hides the texture as much as possible. Or, if we paint ourselves (which is likely), I'll convince her to let me skim coat each room one at a time and spread the work over a longer period of time.

 

All that said, if the drywall was already nice and smooth, I would certainly consider leaving it bare. We were considering moving a few months back, and she noticed that all the homes I liked best were those with excellent drywall finishing.

post #5352 of 5753
Good drywall finish is really only something you notice after you notice bad drywall finish, lol. When we moved into this house the drywall looked 'ok' from a distance, but it took some amount of hours to smooth it and repair all of the visible seams.

The previous paint sheen was light and the color was darker, but all of that became very noticeable upon close inspection and needed attending to before painting white in eggshell. It takes me about a day to repair each room, then another 1/2 day to sand and touch up a second time.

Oddly enough I find it easier to put up new drywall and just do the job correctly from the beginning than it is to try and spot every little thing and repair it.

After enough sweet, it becomes much tougher to put a hole in the wall to hang a painting.
post #5353 of 5753
^ But demoing drywall is THE WORST THING IN THE WORLD.
post #5354 of 5753

I think I may experiment with skim coating on a smaller room, like our closet or one of our sons' rooms. I'm sure that my technique will be awful at first, but hopefully with some practice I'll prove to her that it's worth spending the time. The part that scares me is our very open living/dining/kitchen. I can't imagine doing that whole space in a single day, but maybe if I save it for last I'll be a pro by the time I get to it.

post #5355 of 5753
Remember to drape off the room well as drywall dust coats everything otherwise.
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