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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 354

post #5296 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

Also, caught my eye, but it appears to be venting? If that is the case, why use copper for venting?

Had to look again , I am really bored today. I see hot and cold on each side of that pipe , it must be a drain pipe coming from the upper floor. Still extravagant to have drain pipe in copper.

P.S. I bet Piobaire does not have copper shit-pipes in his house.
post #5297 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

Had to look again , I am really bored today. I see hot and cold on each side of that pipe , it must be a drain pipe coming from the upper floor. Still extravagant to have drain pipe in copper.

P.S. I bet Piobaire does not have copper shit-pipes in his house.

Does anyone else think Med is a little jealous of me?
post #5298 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Does anyone else think Med is a little jealous of me?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

Had to look again , I am really bored today. I see hot and cold on each side of that pipe , it must be a drain pipe coming from the upper floor. Still extravagant to have drain pipe in copper.

P.S. I bet Piobaire does not have copper shit-pipes in his house.

Lol - that is the definition of extravagance, isn't it?
post #5299 of 5761

Thanks guys.  The bathtub is new.  The contractor is just keeping the protective cover on till the bathroom is finished.  I think the large copper pipe is for venting and I have no idea why it's copper.  I'll ask.  By "half bath" I just meant a sink and toilet.  

 

JB, I agree on the toilet drain pipe having that drain hole nearby.  I asked about that, but the contractor said it will drain w/o problems.  I hope that's true.

post #5300 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post
 

Looks good!  Only worry I would have would be the toilet drain.  The water in the p-trap helps keep the waste lines smells at bay but they look like they will come back through that drain.

That one threw me a bit too. It is hard to scale in that pic but the wye/santee arrangement must be 3" as that's the min for a wc . Sewer gases are trapped by the weir in the toilet so no problem there. Copper DWV systems are not the norm but are still fairly common . A lot of times they are used to reduce the butchering of studs when long horizontal vent runs are required. Nice work, San Francisco holds their plumbers to high standards.

edit: that floor drain has a trap under it you can't see it but it's there trust me

post #5301 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post
 

Took a bunch of pics of the house the past few days. 

 

 

 

Any idea what the wavy lines are on the fan switch?  Humidity sensor?  The electirician said building code required motion sensors, since people often leave the light on all the time. I'm all for saving energy.  Interesting how he lined the screw slots vertically.

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

Heat lamp?

post #5302 of 5761
Our kitchen sink has a copper drain line. It's the only copper drain in the house, though. No idea why.
post #5303 of 5761
I had one, but I broke it when I took it off. For some reason, a mystery really, I think copper drains tend to be made really thin.
post #5304 of 5761

It was probably moved or replaced at some point. Before plastic and no-hub your only other choices were lead and oakum or durham(galvanized steel threaded pipe with special cast iron threaded fittings) either of which are a bitch to work with in tight quarters ,like under a sink. Fwiw :teach:waste lines carry material from the toilets ,drains carry gray water from showers, sinks, washing machines,etc and sewers are those lines downstream ot the point at which they tie together. Vents are the lines a specified distance above the overflow of the fixtures they service and through the roof

post #5305 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I had one, but I broke it when I took it off. For some reason, a mystery really, I think copper drains tend to be made really thin.


Copper pipe comes in 4 wall thickness Type K marked with a green line the  heaviest and rarely see outside industrial applications ,type L ,blue line, usually required in commercial work, type M,red line, most commonly used in residential domestic water systems, type DWV,yellow line, drain, waste and vent.

post #5306 of 5761

I've learned so much about plumbing in the past few days!

post #5307 of 5761
Interesting. Do they actually enforce those standards on, say, drains and traps that come with sinks and faucets? Or is it just for pipes?
post #5308 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Interesting. Do they actually enforce those standards on, say, drains and traps that come with sinks and faucets? Or is it just for pipes?


Absolutely ,any plumbing fixture installed in the US must be UPC/IAPMO approved . These standards are clearly stated

post #5309 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post
 

I've learned so much about plumbing in the past few days!


Shit rolls downhill and payday is on friday 

post #5310 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I've learned so much about plumbing in the past few days!

You and GF while he was in Iceland.
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