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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 347

post #5191 of 5753
We have proper HVAC available in the new world thus tiny sleeping rooms, easy to keep warm, are not a necessity as in so much if Old World housing stock.
post #5192 of 5753
Because I like it.

There are practical matters - two people use the room, and we have a large bedroom set, so the extra space is convenient. But mostly it's just nice to have something that feels like a little bit of luxury and sanctuary in a busy, noisy house.
post #5193 of 5753

Anybody have experience with a DIY accent wall as seen in the spoiler? My wife wants in-wall speakers to clean up the TV wall, and wants me to install something similar to the picture. I was thinking of starting the wood/paneling just barely under the bottom of the television and bringing it all the way to the ceiling. I thought that would be easier than covering the wall from top to bottom, since I'd need to make cutouts for the center channel speaker.

 


 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

post #5194 of 5753
Accent wall? @StephenHero
post #5195 of 5753
I have a small br I just added an opening skylight . It did wonders for ventilation. Residential ac is rare here but when you need you need it
post #5196 of 5753
Scheduling girl called me Friday afternoon while I was driving, so could not look at my calendar, but my set of custom steel doors are in and ready to be installed. Plan to call her Monday morning and get that scheduled ASAP, pool is staked out and they should excavate this week...it's going to be a relaxing and cozy Xmas at the Piob Palace.
post #5197 of 5753

My inlaws put in a pool when my wife was little and there is a picture of her sitting where the pool will go with stakes all around her.  It is a cute picture of her excitement to finally have a pool.

post #5198 of 5753
Would love to have a pool, nice work Pio. There is a lot of reasons in both directions (for or against) but I think it's something nice to have and especially if you will use it regularly.

I visited a clients house with an indoor lap pool right off of the master bedroom and thought....I could really get used to having that. Wake up, take a few laps then shower and get on with the day....sounds nice.
post #5199 of 5753
I plan to skip the whole cottage thing that's big up here and go outdoor pool. Indoor is always quite the novelty but you better love swimmin to have that roof all summer.

Lots of neat options for garden integration etc.


Suburbs obv, lol.
post #5200 of 5753
Thanks, SG. I really could live without the pool but she wants a small one just to cool off in. It's going to look great and my spa benefits as it will get a real filter system vs. the type those plastic stand alones have. The whole package should be very relaxing and I'm really looking forward to see it at night, with the spa spillway and the two three foot "sheer descents" lit up an azure blue by the underwater LEDs. Couple that with the fire pit going, all the new landscaping lite up in a nice way, and I'll have my own Four Seasons relaxation area.
post #5201 of 5753
Dirty. Poast some pixx immediatmenteh once complete!
post #5202 of 5753
Not sure I ever talked about this. About a year and a half ago, we moved downtown and bought our current apartment in a ~150 year-old cast iron building. After an excruciating co-op and loan approval process, we then started what was supposed to be a minor renovation prior to move-in. Truth be told, the apartment was already in great shape and didn't need any repairs or changes, having been previously owned and renovated by an architect. We just thought to make a few refinements that would be much harder to do in the future.

Mainly, we wanted to do new flooring -- 10-inch wide solid European oak to replace the existing strip flooring, which may have been original to the factory that the building once housed. Also, in furthering the minimalist aesthetic of the apartment we wanted to replace all molding with a thin reveal (since the floors appeared relatively level, this was not expected to be a problem). Other minor changes included replacing all existing switches and outlets with flush/seamless versions, re-painting the walls, installing a new railing design on the mezzanine, etc.

At any rate, given a ~1,300 square feet to work on, we were expecting two months of work.

But shortly after prying off the old flooring, my contractor found that the plywood subfloors were rotting away and warping. Okay, not the biggest deal. Replace them. One more week. Then they removed the plywood . . .

As it turns out, half the joists in our living room were a foot lower than the rest. For no apparent reason. Whoever had previously converted the space to its current form simply filled-in the gap with debris, sandwiched between two layers of plywood. The contractor suggested installing sister beams to properly correct the problem. Of course, the building then freaked out that we were making "structural changes." I had to then pay an outside structural engineer to approve our plan. It then took a month for the co-op board to approve--during which time no other work could be done. This is all to say nothing of all the extra money and time needed to implement the solution.

The whole renovation job wound up taking six months, not two.

After installing the sister beams:



Most. Fucking. Painful. Experience. In. My. Life.

However, now we probably have the most level floors in all of downtown Manhattan.
post #5203 of 5753
That is why I always tell people moving into old spaces to figure double the time and a 30-40% contingency fund on any renovation like that. There's just always something bad lurking if you tear enough of the existing stuff out.

So did you guys get in? How does it look now?
post #5204 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

That is why I always tell people moving into old spaces to figure double the time and a 30-40% contingency fund on any renovation like that. There's just always something bad lurking if you tear enough of the existing stuff out.

So did you guys get in? How does it look now?

Yeah we've been moved-in for about nine months. Place looks great overall, but I'm always spotting tiny details I want to fix up.
post #5205 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by flvinny521 View Post

Anybody have experience with a DIY accent wall as seen in the spoiler? My wife wants in-wall speakers to clean up the TV wall, and wants me to install something similar to the picture. I was thinking of starting the wood/paneling just barely under the bottom of the television and bringing it all the way to the ceiling. I thought that would be easier than covering the wall from top to bottom, since I'd need to make cutouts for the center channel speaker.



  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)






"Accent wall" is the answer to no question ever.

Why don't you just mount everything to the wall directly and fish the wires up and behind the drywall? Also, there are in-wall speakers you can get and even behind-drywall speakers which are actually invisible. Audio quality will not be the greatest possible, but who cares if you just need decent TV speakers.
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